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Thanks. For all the flak LCDs get at times, it's interesting to see professionals working on computer graphics use LCD monitors for video editing.
 

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very much thanks for the info..
 

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Most editing suites use LCDs these days.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Readykilowatt /forum/post/18225695


Thanks. For all the flak LCDs get at times, it's interesting to see professionals working on computer graphics use LCD monitors for video editing.

Because there are only LCD computer monitors being made. Larger, consumer LCD panels still get the deserved flak.
 

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The "Aperture Grill" CRT production (as in Sony Trinitron) ended in 2005. Those 2005 vintage CRT multisync monitors are probably going to be the last analog displays in widespread use, and some graphics professionals stocked up a few spares and may in fact use CRTs for another decade or so. Most CRTs were 4:3 although Sony had a well-regarded 16:10 series that were very close in size and beg comparison to the HP 24" 16:10 we are discussing.


IMHO the HP LP2480zx is a GREAT professional graphics monitor. It's very wide color gamut, calibration software, HDCP support, analog and digital inputs, and extensive set of controls make it a great CRT replacement. The 16:10 aspect ratio allows a graphics professional to display an entire 16:9 video frame and have toolbars visble at the top or bottom of his screen.


What the LP2480zx is NOT is a great video monitor for moving images. It's 12ms panel response time adds visible blur to Blu-Ray playback and is far short of the current crop of 4ms and 5ms 16:9 LCD consumer video monitors.


However, what the LP2480zx proves is that carefull design and manufacturing can eliminate the off-axis intensity and color shift problems that plague the consumer LCD panels. Admittedly this comes at a higher price today, but it offers hope that in the near future such wide angle panels will make their way into consumer video displays.
 

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Wouldn't a more critical monitor question be "Which monitor is used for Color Timing"? I understand that editing involves looking at colors, but isn't there a separate step in the theatrical film post-production process called Color Timing? The refresh rate of the HP monitors may not be all that important since "editing" and "color timing" involves a lot of frame-by-frame analyzing.
 
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