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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,


I'm in the beginning phases of my HT construction, I'm doing it myself (pretty handy) and have pulled permits. My basement room is approximately 12x19, 3 sides are concrete blocks (front and two sides, one w/ a door), with the rear being a studded wall with a door into my workshop. I'm studding out the walls w/ 2x4's with the sole plates being 1" from the wall on the exterior sides (for moisture reasons). I'll be using R-13 on the exterior walls (kraft faced). As for my ceiling, I'll probably go w/ R-28 or so, haven't quite decided. Right now I just about finished the walls, before insulation I'll be doing wiring and cable runs (2" conduit, I think).


I'm leaning heavily towards either using resilient channel or RISC-1 w/ a hat channel to further isolate the walls, then 5/8" drywall (single layer - staring to run out of room!). My ceiling height is limited, I have about 80" before drywall. One large concern is noise leaking upstairs, it is a small house and currently, if a gnat sneezes in the basement, we hear it. Because of this I may also put a layer of sound absorption material in the ceiling.


So if I go through all this (or some variation), my concern is with outlets. Since an electrical outlet box is nailed to the studs (code), am I defeating the purpose of sound isolation as these boxes (probably at least 8) bypass the channels? Would using a layer of some sound absorption material between the box and the stud be advisable (or something similar)? Or is the size/number of such boxes mean relatively little impact on what sound leaks out?


Also, any comments on my current plans?


Thanks so much!


Bob
 

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That is why people create "columns" They help hide the rear speakers, and since they are built inside the sealed room, also allow the placement of the code required outlets without breaking the sealed room (Except the wire hole that is easily caulked.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ah, that's good information. Then would I run my romex through the studs in the traditional method and then have a small hole come out of the drywall into a column cavity? Is a column built with a frame & drywall?


Thanks again,

Bob
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by bob md
Ah, that's good information. Then would I run my romex through the studs in the traditional method and then have a small hole come out of the drywall into a column cavity? Is a column built with a frame & drywall?


Thanks again,

Bob
Exactly. As for columns, I think most use MDF but I suppose you could use drywall.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If MDF (which makes better sense), how is it treated for appearance sakes? Paint?

Thanks,

Bob
 

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Not sure if it meets your local code but if you are building a riser you can put your outlets there. I put a couple on the face and on the top of my riser and that was enough for the room. My rear speker wires come out of the riser too.


Re: the columns I wrapped the tops in fabric and used wainscoting on the bottoms.
 

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Without trying to hijack this thread, i've got a related question. My local inspector told me that I have to have an outlet every 6'. Its not practical for me to hide all these outlets in columns or anything, so i'm going to have to use some boxes through the double drywall. Is there any advantage to using one electrical box over another? does it matter if its metal, fiberglass or plastic?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Siropa,


Don't worry about hijacking this thread, it's a good question. I may be doing the same thing, I'll find out about my code next week. Some places it's every 6', others are any device must be w/in 6' so (in theory) you could have say a receiver inbetween 2 outlets 12' apart and meet code.
 

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I found the plastic boxes with a metal flange on one side worked out the best for me. The metal flange is screwed or nailed to the stud, and it has a screw in it that you turn in order to move the box in or out (relative to the face of the wall); so getting it flush with the finished drywall is a snap.


They were cheap, too - only a buck-and-change each (I think) at HD.


I made my columns out of steel studs and drywall. MDF is great stuff, but it's heavy and creates a VERY fine dust when you cut it.


Good luck,


Dwight
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Interesting....

Are you running your romex through the wall studs & just poking a hole from the drywall into the column at the outlet height? Are you running anything else in the column (like a light) or speaker cable? Also, how much does that screw move the outlet box? I like that idea of easily moving the box...


Bob
 

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Bob,


I also used the Carlon Adjustable Zip Boxes (see my link below for pictures) and they worked out great. Used them for all wall outlets and switches as well as the floor outlets on my seating riser.


Max adjustment seems to be about 2-1/8" which will get me just past my double-drywall (1/2" over 5/8") and 1" of acoustical material and fabric.


Anything beyond 2-1/8" and the box becomes a bit unstable as the screw at this point is just barely holding box to bracket.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Hi Chip,


These look good, did you buy that off the web or in a home improvement store?


BTW, your pictures are nice, lots of them! I was interested in why you didn't use the conduit for your cabling, it would seem to me if you needed to pull an existing cable, it would be easier to do it if it were in conduit. Or are you not concerned about pulling something existing - you'll just leave it and pull something new through the conduit?


Anyhow, great pics!!!
 

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Bob,


Both the single- and double-gang adjustable boxes were/are available at my local HD and Lowes.


As for the conduit, I chose to leave it empty to facilitate future wiring requirements. Since my walls and ceiling are unfinished I have easy access to pull all the cabling I need outside the conduit. this leaves me the full diameter for whatever comes along later. If for some reason a cable goes bad I won't need to pull it out...I'll just run a new one through the empty conduit.


Thanks for the compliments on the HT. I hope to have some additional progress to report soon.
 

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Power and audio/video cables should not be run together. (i.e. parallel) I believe a minimum 12"-18" of separation is recommended. Where A/V cables and power runs must cross it should be done perpendicular. (+)
 

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Siropa, et al, according to the NEC, receptacles must be (1) within 6' of any door opening, (2) within 12' of one another, and (3) on any wall segment 2' or wider.


The idea is that any electrical item with a 6' cord will not require the use of an extension cord. Around corners, whether inside or outside, you just follow the floor line.


A floor-mounted receptacle must be within 18" of the wall to be counted as a required receptacle.
 
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