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My mkII is still going. I use it to digitize hard to get records that are not available on cd.
After not using for 10 years the only issue I had was that the oil in the arm lift mechanism had become a bit gloopy. This improved after exercising it a bit by pressing it down manually.
 

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Implying that they just up and decided to start making them again to "cash in on their good name" is nonsense. People had been asking for it for years, even creating an online petition that got over 25,000 signatures. When they finally did re-introduce it, the motor had been redesigned and the whole turntable had been updated so it's not as though they just started turning them out again using the same old tooling.
As a matter of fact, I believe the only tooling they still had were those to make the dust covers and perhaps the 45 RPM adapter.
 

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I still have my SL1200 and it sounds great (good Audio Technica cartridge helps).

Slight change of subject: does anyone know where to get a replacement dust cover (and the attachment brackets) for the SL1200?
Thanks.
 

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...The official reason stated by the company for the turntable being discontinued was "lack of suppliers for critical analog components."
Analog components? What analog components? The only thing remotely analog would be the motor speed control, other than that it is direct wire from cartridge to output.

Implying that they just up and decided to start making them again to "cash in on their good name" is nonsense. People had been asking for it for years, ...
Yes indeed they were asking for them, perhaps begging for them, but at $500 to $1000, not $2000 to $4000. Though as has been pointed out, they had no trouble selling them at those prices. At to "cashing in on their good name" they most certainly did. As you pointed out, there was a demand specifically for Technics. They knew that name would bring a premium price, and it most certainly did.

When they finally did re-introduce it, the motor had been redesigned and the whole turntable had been updated so it's not as though they just started turning them out again using the same old tooling.
As others pointed out, likely that old tooling was gone. But, they still look like Super OEM turntables. While they may be better, the tonearms looks exactly like the old Technic tonearms, plus tonearms from Audio Technica, Pioneer, Reloop, Lenco, and Stanton. Doesn't seem that hard to find tooling when near identical tonearms already exist. I then just become a matter of choosing the desired material. As far as milling the platter, I think all that takes is a CNC lathe.

Note, I do not think this is a bad turntable, I'm just stunned by the price. There are plenty of other DJ turntable for 1/4th that price, and there are plenty of quality HiFi turntable at or near that price.

But as has been pointed out, they are having no trouble selling them. At least not now that the early adopters are jumping it. But much like the latest iPhone, I expect the price to drop considerably once the initial early adopter craze has past. I don't personally see that price as sustainable in the long run.

Still, I wish them luck, and given that there are few reviews of this turntable, it is hard to determine whether it lives up to its price or not. That may change in the future, it may not, or it may very well live up to its price. We will have to wait and see.

I know Stereophile Reviewed the Pioneer PLX-1000 and had nothing but very positive things to say about it, and it only costs $700. Besides the rave review, it made the 2016 Recommended Components list.

"Forget analog vs digital or tubes vs solid-state; the most pervasive and poorly considered belief of all is that only belt-drive turntables are worthy of audiophile consideration."

"Belts can't touch the PLX-1000's excitement, naturally formed detail, and clearly expressed forward momentum,"

"This new Pioneer also showcases the complex tonal character and elegant structures of classical music better than any affordable belt-drive I've experienced."

"the PLX-1000, whose motor has more than twice the torque of its famous forebear, "is not only a worthy successor to the legendary Technics SL-1200MK2, it is a serious contender for the best audiophile-grade turntable for less than $2000.""

Pioneer PLX-1000 = $700

With praise that high for $700, do I really need to spend $2000? I guess the answer is up to the individual.

Steve/bluewizard
 

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I still have my SL1200 and it sounds great (good Audio Technica cartridge helps).

Slight change of subject: does anyone know where to get a replacement dust cover (and the attachment brackets) for the SL1200?
Thanks.
Here you go: http://www.kabusa.com/

He's got just about everything for the SL-1200. I picked up mine new from his clearance section for a steal almost 10 years ago that had a few of his mods installed (Cardas arm re-wire, damping trough, outboard PS - no idea if the mods do anything, but that's how it came) and it's been faultless in almost daily use since then. I've been running most of that time with a Denon DL103R into a Bob's Devices CineMag CMQEE-3440A step-up then into a Cambridge 640p phono. Exceptionally well-made and it just feels very solid, with no play in the parts, in use.
 

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... Anyway, what seems to be the best bang for the buck in the $500-$1000 range for a TT? Also what cartridge boasts the same bang for the buck? I remember 8-10 years ago it was the aforementioned turntable with a Shure M97xE. couldn't beat that combo for $600. Anything out there that comes close?

Thanks,
Let's remember to focus on the actual SUBJECT of this Thread. There are plenty of other discussions on the merits and demerits of the Technics SL-1200 turntable.

But this Poster is specifically asking for recommendations on a new replacement turntable in the roughly $500 to $1000 range. That should be the focus of the discussion.

Steve/bluewizard
 

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Other turntable in the suggested budget range would be -

Project Debut Carbon Esprit SB - Black - $599 - (other colors available) -

http://www.needledoctor.com/Pro-Ject-Debut-Carbon-Esprit-DC-Black?sc=2&category=352

Project Debut Carbon Espirt with 2M Blue Cartridge - Black - $799 - (other colors available)-

http://www.needledoctor.com/Debut-Carbon-Esprit-Black-with-2M-Blue-stylus?sc=2&category=352

The ESPRIT is an upgraded Debut Carbon.

Pushing up close to the top of the budget -

Project Xpression Classic - Black - $999 - (also Olive and Mahogany) -


http://www.needledoctor.com/Pro-Ject-Xpression-Classic-in-Black?sc=2&category=352

http://www.needledoctor.com/Pro-Ject-Xpression-Classic-in-Olive?sc=2&category=352

http://www.needledoctor.com/Pro-Ject-Xpression-Classic-in-Mahogany?sc=2&category=352

There is also another Xpressions model for a bit less -

Project 1Xpression Carbon - Black - $799 -

http://www.needledoctor.com/Pro-Ject-1Xpression-Carbon-Turntable_2?sc=2&category=352

REGA
is a well regarded brand of turntable and most certainly worth considering. Though best if you buy a model with the Performance Pack, which includes among other things an upgrade to a very good Rega Cartridge -

Rega Planar 1 with Performance Pack - $540 -

http://www.needledoctor.com/Rega-RP1-W-Performance-Pack-Cool-Grey_3?sc=2&category=353

Rega Planar 2 - $675 -


http://www.needledoctor.com/Rega-Planar-2-Turntable?sc=2&category=353

Rega Planar 3 - $945 to $1145 -


http://www.needledoctor.com/Rega-Planar-3-Turntable?sc=2&category=353

And as mentioned before Music Hall -

Music Hall MMF-2.3 - $499 to $549 (depending on color) -

http://www.needledoctor.com/Music-Hall-MMF-2-3-Turntable?sc=2&category=351

Music Hall MMF-2.3 SE - Natural Wood Finish - $750 -


http://www.needledoctor.com/Music-Hall-MMF-2-3-Turntable?sc=2&category=351

Music Hall MMF-5.3 - Black - $1049 -

http://www.needledoctor.com/Music-Hall-MMF-5-3-Turntable?sc=2&category=351

These are all proven turntables, well rated, well reviewed, with long histories and good reputations.

In Direct Drive DJ-Style Turntables, there are a range of options, depending on how much your really want to spend -

http://www.needledoctor.com/Online-Store/Direct-Drive-Turntables

On any of these turntables you can find reviews and a closer look on YouTube.

The Audio Technica LP1240 at $450 is a bargain in a quality turntable.

If you want to go for quality, as I have pointed out in another post, the Pioneer PLX-1000 got a rave review from Stereophile Magazine. Priced at a still reasonable $700.

If you want to trim your budget back a bit, then the Pioneer PLX-500 or the Audio Technica LP120 are worth considering. Again, you can find YouTube videos reviewing these and you can get a more detailed look at them. These run $300 to $350, but will probably need a cartridge upgrade.

If you want to see more DJ-Style Direct Drive Turntable go to Musician Supply sites like - Sweetwater, Guitar Center, Musicians Friend, and ZZound -

http://www.zzounds.com/cat--Turntables--2462

http://www.guitarcenter.com/Turntables.gc

https://www.sweetwater.com/c655--Turntables

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/turntables

You will also notice the addition of a brand called RELOOP, which make what are called Super OEM turntable. The Super OEM all resemble each other very closely.

Reloop RP-7000 High Torque Turntable - $599 -

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/pro-audio/reloop-rp-7000-high-torque-turntable

The Reloop 8000 has some additional feature that no one will need for home use, though a DJ might have some use for them

Reloop RP-8000 Advanced Hybrid Torque Turntable - $699 -

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/pro-audio/reloop-rp-7000-high-torque-turntable

I present that for reference, unlikely a home user would need anything above the RP-7000.

Stanton has probably been in the game the longest, and if I were in the market for a DJ-Style turntable, of the Stanton likely I would only consider the Stanton ST-150 with "S" Tonearm. A bit more expensive than the Audio Technica, but still affordable .

Stanton ST-150 with "S" Tonearm - $479 -


http://www.musiciansfriend.com/pro-audio/stanton-st-150-digital-turntable-with-s-tone-arm-regular

Audio Technical LP1240 ("S" Arm) - $449 -


http://www.zzounds.com/item--AUTATLP1240USB

Once again, a reminder to pay attention to whether or not the Turntable comes with a Cartridge and if it does, pay attention to what cartridge it comes with. I generally don't recommend cartridge at much less that $100.

I posted a link before of what I consider good cartridges, but for example the Ortofon 2M Series is just that a series of cartridge - Red, Blue, Bronze, Black -

http://www.needledoctor.com/Online-Store/Ortofon-Phono-Cartridges

Grado is a good brand of Cartridge -

http://www.needledoctor.com/Online-Store/Grado-Phono-Cartridges

The Grado Prestige series has a nice range of cartridge -

http://www.needledoctor.com/Online-Store/Grado-Labs-Prestige-Series-Phono-Cartridges

Of course the Shure M97 is always a winner -

http://www.needledoctor.com/Online-Store/Shure-Phono-Cartridges

Gold Ring certainly has it fans -

http://www.needledoctor.com/Online-Store/Goldring-Phono-Cartridges

Audio Technica Cartridge
cover a considerable range -

http://www.needledoctor.com/Online-Store/Audio-Technica-Phono-Cartridges

In approximately the $100 range, certainly the Ortofon 2M Red, the Shure M97, Audio Technica AT120Eb, Grado Prestige Blue, Rega Bias 2 would all get the job done.

Once again, just trying to lend perspective to the modern Turntable market.

The first thing you have to decide is whether you still want a Direct Driver DJ-Style turntable. Or, if perhaps you want to move to a Belt Driver HiFi turntable. That's purely your choice. In a DJ-Style, if you can bring your budget that high the Pioneer PLX-1000 with a decent cartridge would keep you under the budget limit. I suspect with a cartridge that turntable would run about $800 to perhaps $850.

However, you could have something like the Stanton ST-150 or the Audio Technica LP1240 with a cartridge upgrade, for about $550 to perhaps as high as $650.

I've not shopped around, but on DJ turntables from musician supply stores seem to have better prices than Needle Doctor. Though Needle Doctor is a reliable source.

Does that help you at all???

Steve/bluewizard
 

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Let's remember to focus on the actual SUBJECT of this Thread. There are plenty of other discussions on the merits and demerits of the Technics SL-1200 turntable.

But this Poster is specifically asking for recommendations on a new replacement turntable in the roughly $500 to $1000 range. That should be the focus of the discussion.

Steve/bluewizard
He also specifically asked "what ever happened to the affordable Technics SL 1200" which is in fact the title of this thread.
 

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He also specifically asked "what ever happened to the affordable Technics SL 1200" which is in fact the title of this thread.
What happened to it is they quit making it. That aspect is solved in one short sentence.

Now they have started making them again, but the cheapest is TWICE the stated budget, so focus on affordable replacements for the Technics.

...in my opinion.

Steve/bluewizard
 

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A word of warning - DJ Turntables that have Straight Arm also have very short arms. These might be fine for DJ purposes, but not for HiFi.

Most Hi-Fi turntables with Straight Arms have longer arms. These are not a problem.

Here is an example of Stanton ST-150 and the ST8-150 -

http://www.stantondj.com/stanton-turntables/str8-150.html

http://www.stantondj.com/stanton-turntables/st150.html

You can see that the Straight tonearm does not even come up close to the Stanton Label.

With the "S" tonearm, the arm extends beyond the Stanton Label. There is a view on the list of photos where you can see the turntables from the top.

Straight DJ arms tend to run in the 7 to 8 inch range, whereas curve DJ arms tend to run in the 8.5" to 10" range, thought 10" would be exceptionally rare. The arms are measures in a straight line between the Gimbal/Pivot and the Stylus.

If you are looking at DJ-Style Turntables, do NOT get the Straight Tonearm.

In Hi-Fi turntables a longer Straight arm is not a problem.

Just thought I would pass that along.

Steve/bluewizard
 

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Here is a review of the Audio Technica LP1240 -


Obviously it has DJ features you don't need, but it is still a good turntable.

Keep in mind these are reviewed from a DJ perspective.

Stanton ST-150 -


Pioneer PLX-1000 -


Keep in mind that most DJ turntables come with Slip Mats. These can be replaced. Cork is popular, though in my opinion, vinyl mats are best.

YouTube is a great source for all kinds of turntable review. Though the Demos are questionable because of compromised sound quality on YouTube. But it is a good way to get a closer look at the various turntables.

For what it is worth.

Steve/bluewizard
 

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Essentially that's what happened, the drive system, controller, and tonearm were redesigned and the turntable was reintroduced.
Well, I'm not seeing the value in the price differential between new and old. A ucontroller running the drive system should have made it less expensive.
 

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We have not heard from the Original Poster (PioBeer)in a while. When that happens, no response, thread usually go far afield. To help us better answer the core questions, at this point, we need a response to this question -

Do you want a Direct Driver DJ-Style Turntable or would you prefer a Belt Drive Hi-Fi turntable?

Once we have that answer, we can better focus recommendations on turntables that will specifically meet your needs.

I've recommended both, some very good options are well under your stated budget. But if you clear up the Type of turntable you want, and refine your budget requirements a bit more precisely, we can focus on specific turntables that will meet your needs.

Lastly, regarding Reloop Turntables, here is another to consider, depending on how much money you want to spend.

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/pro-audio/reloop-rp-4000m-high-torque-turntable

And though pushing the high end, here is another option -

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/pro-audio/denon-vl12-professional-dj-turntable

If you want something that looks cool, just for the sake of looking cool, then something like this -

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/pro-audio/roland-tt-99-3-speed-direct-drive-turntable

Notice how all these turntables look virtually identical. There may be some underlying changes in the specs, but they are essentially the same.

If you are intent on replacing the Technics 1200 with something similar, I have given you several options. If you simply want a good HiFi turntable, we can focus on that.

But until we know what you are looking for, it is going to be difficult for us to help you find it.

Steve/bluewizard
 

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We have not heard from the Original Poster (PioBeer)in a while. When that happens, no response, thread usually go far afield. To help us better answer the core questions, at this point, we need a response to this question -

Do you want a Direct Driver DJ-Style Turntable or would you prefer a Belt Drive Hi-Fi turntable?
Kind of a loaded question. Anyway, it seems clear from his only post that he doesn't care which type, just looking for the best value in the stated price range. Which can be a rather vague question given different perceptions of what constitutes, "value". But you and others have provided several suggestions. Given the nature of the product, there will never be absolute consensus so it's up to the OP to compare and contrast the given advice and make his own decision. If he has follow-up questions, he'll come back when he is ready. I don't understand the conversation-director mentality you tend to employ in these types of threads but I guess we all have our "thang". :)
 

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...I don't understand the conversation-director mentality you tend to employ in these types of threads but I guess we all have our "thang". :)
I generally agree, but not sure about this last part. Fairly consistently the longer it takes the Original Poster to respond in a thread, the farther off course the thread goes. I'm trying to keep it on track and focused on the questions the Original Poster asked.

For example, endless discussion of the merits and demerits of the Technics 1200 (of which there are countless threads), are not really relevant. He asked what happened, and the answer is, they quite making them. Such discussions are tangential, generally irrelevant, and generally unhelpful since he once had the turntable and knows well the merits and demerits.

There are three core questions that should be addressed -

What ever happened to the affordable Technics SL 1200 MK2 turntable?

What seems to be the best bang for the buck in the $500-$1000 range for a TT?

What cartridge boasts the same bang for the buck?


That's where the focus should be.

Typically when the Original Poster does not respond, rather than staying on topic, the discussion wanders into general conversation frequently straying far afield.

To make a judgement on the "best bang for the buck" we need to know what he wants. If he wants to get a Direct Driver DJ turntable, there are many to choose from. But if he wants a Belt Drive Hi-Fi Turntable, then we can concentrate on those. But until he says one or the other, we can't concentrate on anything, we can only speak in generalities.

He has been given a wide range of Turntable and Cartridge recommendations. But not much else can be said until he responds and narrows the field a bit. Without some feedback and guidelines for what he specifically wants, the only possible answer is every turntable and every cartridge within his implied budget range. I think he would like a bit more specific answer than that.

Steve/bluewizard
 

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For example, endless discussion of the merits and demerits of the Technics 1200 (of which there are countless threads), are not really relevant. He asked what happened, and the answer is, they quite making them. Such discussions are tangential, generally irrelevant, and generally unhelpful since he once had the turntable and knows well the merits and demerits.

There are three core questions that should be addressed -

What ever happened to the affordable Technics SL 1200 MK2 turntable?

Sure the sidebar discussion about the new SL-1200 is relevant. The OP devoted his entire first paragraph as to what happened to it and asked why it is no longer affordable. I even posted a video that showed the manufacturing of this new product to which, I might add, the OP gave me a like! So he did come back.

After that, maybe there is no need for him to reengage in this thread because you were kind enough to go shopping for him and gave him a ton of links. He may now know all he needs to know.
 

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The 1240, Stanton, and Pioneer are all pretty much the same table built by Hanpin, which has a spotty history when it comes to quality. Not saying they aren't capable just saying its a roll of the dice.
 

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I've been out of the game a little while (having kids and all - and kids and expensive electronics DO NOT MIX). Back in 2008 you could buy one of these beauties for about $500. Now, it seems like they have been discontinued? WTF? The only thing I could tell is Technics has a 1200GAE version as a replacement, but that is 4K...What happened to this fantastic product? With the resurgence of vinyl lately, it seems like Technics would have made a killing off these. I just don't understand what happened...


Anyway, what seems to be the best bang for the buck in the $500-$1000 range for a TT? Also what cartridge boasts the same bang for the buck? I remember 8-10 years ago it was the aforementioned turntable with a Shure M97xE. couldn't beat that combo for $600. Anything out there that comes close?

Thanks,
Check out the newer Fluance RT-85. Comes complete with Ortofon Blue cart and an acrylic platter for just under $500. I couldn't find a better value for the quality of the build and excellence of the sound.
 

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Check out the newer Fluance RT-85. Comes complete with Ortofon Blue cart and an acrylic platter for just under $500. I couldn't find a better value for the quality of the build and excellence of the sound.
I too have heard this from several others, looks like a very nice entry into the world of vinyl..........
 
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