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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Keep it within the realms of currently existing consumer technology or just one step forward thereof, don't go too nuts and sci-fi just yet.
Personally, my dream OLED TV would be from Sony and have all of the following:
- true 8K at the largest size possible
- Quantum Dot OLEDs
- Native RGB
- full fat 48Gbps HDMI 2.1 for all HDMI ports
- support for resolutions from 240p to 8K with constant refresh rates from 24Hz to 240Hz
- proper 240p support with optional scanlines (not 240p misread as 480i)
- alternating scanlines for 480i and 1080i with proper 50fps/60fps deinterlacing
- the first true 12-bit panel on the market (great for MGVC Blu-rays and Dolby Vision)
- Universal support for all HDR formats (Dolby Vision/HDR10+/HLG/etc...)
- Full G-Sync Ultimate (1Hz - 240Hz) support as well as FreeSync and HDMI VRR
- Passive 3D (it should return for the niche)
- Dolby Vision IQ
And everything else that's already in the current Sony MASTER series TVs both OLED and LED.
One can dream and it still seems plausible with current year tech (albeit way too expensive except for 1% of the population).
 

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It'd be 110" diagonal, 8K with inputs to match, and cost $5k.
 
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Why no anti-glare coating?
Because they rob image depth and transparency, albeit they do reduce glare in a bright room; but at a hefty cost if watching in a dark or dimly lit room. It's like looking through a veil or watching TV with sunglasses on. Anti-glare coatings are an abomination and the worst things ever invented for TVs, IMO (mostly because there isn't an option to get one without one).
 

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RGB printed, 4000 nits, 400 nits fullscreen, full P3 volume. No uniformity issues. Better AR filter.
 

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Why no anti-glare coating?
Look at what happens when you overdo it like Samsung, the Q90R/Q900R had a bit of washed out colors compared to the Q9FN before and it also lowered the contrast modulation. They did fix it mostly with the Q900TS/Q950TS.
 

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Some good ones have already been mentioned, but I have some more practical ones to add.

  • Picture by Picture mode. These large TVs would be perfect for working with 2-4 computers simultaneously. Being able to split the screen in half horizontally or vertically for 3840x1080 or 1920x2160 would be great or you could do one of those and split the other half even further. Or just split into 4x 1080p areas. The inputs are there already!
  • User preset modes. Being able to add your own preset modes instead of reconfiguring existing ones would be nice. You could have one for say gaming with BFI and another for desktop use. Now other than the Game preset mode there seems to be some input lag differences on the others even if you configure them the same (disabling things etc).
  • Better menus. Why does the picture settings have so many sub menus? I should be able to access things like BFI setting with a few clicks rather than digging deep down the menu tree.
  • One click toggle between two inputs from the remote.
Other than that, I would like something like this for desktop use:

  • 38-40" size at 4k, 43-48" at 8K
  • Curved
  • As high refresh rate as possible but let's settle for say 240 Hz at any resolution
 

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It'd be 110" diagonal, 8K with inputs to match, and cost $5k.
Why stop there?

The perfect OLED TV would be sold in rolls 40" to 120" wide, be easily cut to any desired size, attach to walls with velcro strips, and of course accept any resolution, through wireless input.
 

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Many things.

1. Improved motion resolution. OLEDs (and LCD) both have a long way to go for motion resolution that both Plasma and CRT TVs have. I think there are multiple ways LG can accomplish this. Native 240hz panels so we can have true 120hz black frame insertion. Possibly even 480hz panels in the future.

2. Low light uniformity and better low brightness accuracy. From what I heard, OLED TVs can struggle with very low light shades of grey and colors. OLEDs need to improve transitioning out of black. The Panasonic HZ2000 has low IRE calibration settings which should help a lot. Overall better low light accuracy would make dark movies and scenes look even better.

3. Improved brightness and less burn in. Apparently the Panasonic GZ2000 has lower image retention risk, at least according to a review from HDTVtest. However the GZ2000 is also brighter than your normal OLED TVs since it uses a custom modified LG panel made by Panasonic.

4. Color Volume. Overall OLEDs will look awesome, however having more color volume for high brightness colors will make the image look even better.

Bonus: The return of full 1080p passive 3D. Combine a 900 to 1,000 nit OLED panel with true 120hz BFI (240hz panel) with 5:5 pulldown, coupled with Passive 3D. I think that would objectively be the best 3D image quality in the world.
 

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Some good ones have already been mentioned, but I have some more practical ones to add.

  • Picture by Picture mode. These large TVs would be perfect for working with 2-4 computers simultaneously. Being able to split the screen in half horizontally or vertically for 3840x1080 or 1920x2160 would be great or you could do one of those and split the other half even further. Or just split into 4x 1080p areas. The inputs are there already!
A lot of TVs can do PiP with one source being the TV tuner. There must be a reason why we've never seen PiP with multiple HDMI inputs and I'm sure it has to do with cost. No point spending so much on something few people use. Most TV manufacturers get their HDMI chipsets from third parties and this is obviously not something they care to implement.
 

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Realistically speaking a consumer 'perfect' OLED would probably be a HZ2000 with full HDMI 2.1, LG low lag and webOS.

Obviously a 65" version of the Sony BVM-X300 using true RGB would be the ultimate but I don't consider that to fall under the 'currently existing consumer tech' part of the OP's question.
 

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Why stop there?

The perfect OLED TV would be sold in rolls 40" to 120" wide, be easily cut to any desired size, attach to walls with velcro strips, and of course accept any resolution, through wireless input.
Sounds good.
 

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The perfect OLED tv already exists its the Panasonic HZ2000 the only OLED tv with 1,000 nits of peak brightness the only fault its not available in 77 inches.
 

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I'd like to see some features *removed* and my OLED to be functionally just a display, not a TV. I don't need apps (that's what my Apple TV is for) and I don't need speakers (have a 5.1 surround system for that). Just a 4K display with the best possible PQ & light levels please.
 
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