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I'm still rocking a pair of E-310s from the 90s. While they've been great and can still crank, I'm definitely looking to demote them to the basement to just jam out to while playing foosball, throwing darts, or whatever. Perhaps they'll be some great garage speakers. They've also been great outside at parties. One of CV's strengths if memory serves me correctly. Not the best quality per se, but definitely don't mind being played loud.

I remember CVs being super popular back in the day and kind of just noticed that I haven't heard anybody talk about the brand in well over a decade (or two). What the heck happened to the company? I know they're still around (sort of?), but are they just a shell of their former selves? I noticed mine were made in America, while the wiki says they're now made in China and Malaysia. Do they just kind of suck now?
 

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Cerwin Vega is still going strong as far as I know. If you check YouTube, you will find many people with C-V systems. However, they don't have the prominence they once had because there are many more refined speakers available. But Cerwin still fill a niche very nicely. I'm assuming the 310 has a 10" bass driver, so there are still a couple of models near that one.

XLS - DJ and large venue speakers -
http://cerwinvega.com/home-audio/xl...shelf-center-channel-subwoofers-speakers.html

SL - Home Music/Cinema Speakers -
http://cerwinvega.com/home-audio/sl-series.html

CMX - the new Home Cinema Series -

http://cerwinvega.com/home-audio/cm...shelf-center-channel-subwoofers-speakers.html

VE - Home Music Speakers -
http://cerwinvega.com/home-audio/ve-series-floorstanding-bookshelf-center-channel-speakers.html

I think CMX and VE are no longer in production, but there still may be stocks of them available.

The main advantage to Cerwin Vega is that they go LOUD and have serious IMPACT, and while they do sound good, there are more refined speakers out there. So the choice is all down to taste.

YouTube - Cerwin Vega XLS -

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=Cerwin+Vega+XLS

Steve/bluewizard
 

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I'm not sure why CV doesn't get more love on these forums when budget builds are discussed. Based on my own experience with the brand, I would gladly build another CV setup before I considered the usual suspects that are mentioned here for budget speakers.

I had a pair of three way towers with 12" woofers (can't recall the model) that I used throughout my high school and college years in the 90s, and they still sounded great when I gave them to a friend (in 2004 I think). At some point I also bought CV center, surrounds, and a passive 15" sub. For whatever reason, I never got the output out of the sub I was expecting, so I eventually gave that to a friend as well. When I went to his house a few years later, he was playing some music with some thumping bass. I guess he figured out how to set it up properly. :D
 

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I'm not sure why CV doesn't get more love on these forums when budget builds are discussed. Based on my own experience with the brand, I would gladly build another CV setup before I considered the usual suspects that are mentioned here for budget speakers.:D
Audio snobbery.......:) Excuse me do you have any Grey Pupon.....:D
 

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I think the problem is people have moved away from big woofers to subwoofers. They want their speakers to be modern looking. To look cool.
 

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Interesting. Glad to see CV's still getting some love around here. Since Gibson/Stanton's taken over, has there been any change in quality for better or worse?

So perhaps the company's just not pushing them to the average consumer like they used to back in the day. Just seemed odd to me that I just don't see them around homes or cars like I used to. In fact, I'm the only person I (personally) know of who still has some. Sure, I've had plenty of people come over who instantly recognize them and have fond memories of the brand, and love the way my 310s sound, but again, I just don't see them around anymore.
 

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Cerwin Vegas are responsible for my reduced hearing capacity. When I was in high school we threw lots of parties (at my friends... :)...) and the two floorstanding 12" driver Vegas rocked the party. The bass was soooooo astonishing it is partly responsible for my bass craving today 2 decades later!
Haha. Same here, my friend. Same here. Those puppies just crank. Makes so many modern speaker setups seem SO puny by comparison, especially when unaided by a powered sub.

I'm not sure why CV doesn't get more love on these forums when budget builds are discussed. Based on my own experience with the brand, I would gladly build another CV setup before I considered the usual suspects that are mentioned here for budget speakers.
That's what had me kind of confused, making me wonder what happened to the brand. Back in the 90's at least, I found it very difficult to get more bang for my buck, and still enjoy them to this day. Sure, they're far from the kind of refinement you'll find in higher end speakers, but I found them to be a fantastic value. I guess that's still the case then? Perhaps I can still suggest them to people with large rooms and small budgets looking for a fun HT setup.
 

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That's what had me kind of confused, making me wonder what happened to the brand. Back in the 90's at least, I found it very difficult to get more bang for my buck, and still enjoy them to this day. Sure, they're far from the kind of refinement you'll find in higher end speakers, but I found them to be a fantastic value. I guess that's still the case then? Perhaps I can still suggest them to people with large rooms and small budgets looking for a fun HT setup.
When I bought mine back in the early 90s, they were widely available at Best Buy. I imagine the termination of that relationship had a lot to do with them falling off the radar a bit. If the new ones sound anything like our old 90s relics, I would think they'd be a great HT setup for those on a tight budget. Regarding the size of the speakers, it seems that giant speakers are making a bit of a comeback (see JTR, Seaton, etc).
 

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I'm still rocking a pair of E-310s from the 90s. While they've been great and can still crank, I'm definitely looking to demote them to the basement to just jam out to while playing foosball, throwing darts, or whatever. Perhaps they'll be some great garage speakers. They've also been great outside at parties. One of CV's strengths if memory serves me correctly. Not the best quality per se, but definitely don't mind being played loud.

I remember CVs being super popular back in the day and kind of just noticed that I haven't heard anybody talk about the brand in well over a decade (or two). What the heck happened to the company? I know they're still around (sort of?), but are they just a shell of their former selves? I noticed mine were made in America, while the wiki says they're now made in China and Malaysia. Do they just kind of suck now?
In the early 90s when I was living in the San Fernando Valley while in college and first getting into audio, I remember fondly my brand new Cerwin-Vega AT-15s, a model an older salesman referred to as "lease-breakers." I ran those with a 375w/ch Carver M4.0t and you could hear them in the next block. They were seriously great rock speakers and I regret selling them. Back then, they were made just over the hill in Simi Valley. Nowadays, I think they're made in Asia and I'm not sure how the quality is. Actually, even back then they were not refined loudspeakers, they were simply LOUDspeakers.

Over the decades following, I would own several big Martin-Logans, B&W 801 S3, NHT 3.3, Carver Amazing Platinums, and several models of Magneplanars. Yet to this day, I still fondly look back on how much fun those big CVs were.

In hindsight, it's probably best that I didn't keep them, otherwise I'd probably have lost my hearing by now! :)
 

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CV's still rock the block!
I used to work in a high-end HiFi store in the early 90's. CV always sounded better than anything we had. Most customers agreed. They had very high efficiency. Over 100 dB @ 1 watt.
In 2010, I purchased 2 CV VE-12's from Amazon without hearing them and was blown away! I would have returned them if I didn't like them. But I loved them!
They sound incredible for music and home theater. So I bought a full set for 7 channel HT. I use Def Tech subs with them.
Now I use them with an Atmos AVR and they sound better than ever with Audyssey MultEQ XT32! When I play Anathema's "We're Here Because We're Here" DVD-Audio 6ch with DTS Neural X or DSU upmix, it's like Ho Lee Fuk!
The quality of the enclosure is good. Speaker quality is perfect. They are all designed in the US and made in China.
 

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Ahhhhh, Cerwin-Vega

They got bought out by Stanton in 2003 then Gibson about 9 years ago so a shadow of what they once were. Several factors took them out, mostly the market shifted from really high efficiency, large speakers to low efficiency small speakers as power was cheap and getting cheaper. The cabinet costs, shipping costs and even the cost of copper used in inductors continued going up as the price for decent drivers fell thanks to CNC machining, China etc.

It is considerably cheaper to make small 2-way speakers and couple them with a sub as that shifts the huge costs of crossovers required for a 3-way to the AVR. Small 2-ways that are not efficient require more power but power is cheap. Spent $700 on a 250 WPC amp back in 1991, recalculate that to inflation it would be $1,400 in 2017 dollars. No problem picking up a Crown XLS1500 with crossover filters built-in for $350 now so power has fallen 75% in costs--but the prices on wood, shipping and materials have outpaced inflation due to demand globally. A large, efficient 3-way speaker with large, copper inductors, big caps and such to crossover an 8 ohm load down at 500Hz is very expensive! Build the large enclosure correctly, ship the heavy weight to distributors, ship it to stores etc and the cost goes through the roof!

Demand fell for large speakers because of the high cost, they take up a lot of space, heavy to move around and so on. In the 90's, the writing was on the wall as computers starting sucking up entertainment money. The internet cost money so that kept dropping and in the mid-2000's--flat screen TVs and BluRays starting taking chunks out of the budget. 30 years ago you had a TV, a VCR and blew big bucks on the sound system as that was the center piece. 20 years ago that money went to computers and internet fees--10 years ago large screen TVs we sucking up the funds but at least computers didn't cost 2 grand.

Speaker companies felt the squeeze as the audio market peaked in 1990 and went into decline. The best way to cut costs is to make smaller speakers and consumers lost their taste for giant boxes since computers, TVs etc. take up space. If you looked at "audio style" in the late 70's and 80's, it was a matching, very large rack system that was huge! Once the big racks went away, that signaled the shift to smaller speakers and that is still true today.

Hindsite is 20/20 so CV should of adapted and went to efficient 2-ways with woofers from 6.5" to 10" and made 12 to 18" subwoofers--maybe offered PA type subs that were really efficient. Not sure if it would of helped, the college kids were heavy into computers and cell phones so audio systems were not that "cool" anymore.

I owned Cerwin-Vega 3-way 15" PA speakers for PA use 27 years ago--they were very efficient, very loud and durable for that purpose although not clean sounding. A friend of mine had the CV M series which was a giant speaker, very efficient and had fuses for the mid and self-resetting breakers for the tweeter horns. You could make your ears ring from a simple receiver, great bass for the time and sounded decent enough when not in party mode. He sold them when he got married sort of thing and wish he kept them. Great speakers to have parties, beat them because of drinking too much and making mistakes and durable for surviving your single years.

In summation, CV did not respond to the changing market in the '90's to smaller/cheaper/less efficient speakers so got taken out in 2003. The market for large, efficient speakers is not there in the consumer market, you can get them from Klipsch with a price tag to match. The closest thing at a reasonable price for a party speaker are PA speakers--basically what a CV speaker actually was. A pair of Mackie C200 10" 2-way PA speakers ($400) and a JTR 118HT ($1,400 ???) a Yamaha 100 WPC integrated amp at around $300 will set you back around $2,100 total but would be close. Swap the Yamaha for a Crown XLS1500 with it's active crossovers--mesh it with the crossover of the JTR while using some sort of pre-amp, mixer or whatever would bump the price up another $100 to $200 and you'll be in full party speaker mode but have better extension down low, better sound quality and more flexibility.

The market moves on, the big, efficient speakers are a niche' but you can still get that sort of thing without going broke by mixing PA and really efficient cinema speakers together. Or, just pick up a pair of huge JBL 4722N cinema speakers at 104dB 1w/1m and enjoy very clean sound, insane amounts of output by slapping on a PA amp to drive them. $3K for those beasts, they are ugly, huge, heavy so no style points for you.

Other people get the same thing by building their own, the DIY Sound Group has a beast with two 18" PA woofers, a 12" PA mid and a massive horn that stands about 5 feet tall. $1,800 for the kit with everything you need including the front baffle piece. You have to build the massive cabinet but if you want to kick it old school with beastly speakers but gain great sound quality that well engineered drivers offer--always an option.

Cerwin-Vega went the way of massive sound systems, it was a good time having a 20" TV and 4 foot tall speakers--but running a 7 channel with the massive Vegas would be a bit much. :eek:
 

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I too used to have AT-15s throughout my formative years. I loved those things. I sold them when I didn't have room for them any longer and they had zero WAF. I've re-created them and more recently with a PSA speaker and sub setup. I used to have 2 tower speakers with 15s in them back in the day, now I have dual 18s in the bedroom via the PSA V3601.
 

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Ahhhhh, Cerwin-Vega

They got bought out by Stanton in 2003 then Gibson about 9 years ago so a shadow of what they once were. Several factors took them out, mostly the market shifted from really high efficiency, large speakers to low efficiency small speakers as power was cheap and getting cheaper. The cabinet costs, shipping costs and even the cost of copper used in inductors continued going up as the price for decent drivers fell thanks to CNC machining, China etc.

It is considerably cheaper to make small 2-way speakers and couple them with a sub as that shifts the huge costs of crossovers required for a 3-way to the AVR. Small 2-ways that are not efficient require more power but power is cheap. Spent $700 on a 250 WPC amp back in 1991, recalculate that to inflation it would be $1,400 in 2017 dollars. No problem picking up a Crown XLS1500 with crossover filters built-in for $350 now so power has fallen 75% in costs--but the prices on wood, shipping and materials have outpaced inflation due to demand globally. A large, efficient 3-way speaker with large, copper inductors, big caps and such to crossover an 8 ohm load down at 500Hz is very expensive! Build the large enclosure correctly, ship the heavy weight to distributors, ship it to stores etc and the cost goes through the roof!

Demand fell for large speakers because of the high cost, they take up a lot of space, heavy to move around and so on. In the 90's, the writing was on the wall as computers starting sucking up entertainment money. The internet cost money so that kept dropping and in the mid-2000's--flat screen TVs and BluRays starting taking chunks out of the budget. 30 years ago you had a TV, a VCR and blew big bucks on the sound system as that was the center piece. 20 years ago that money went to computers and internet fees--10 years ago large screen TVs we sucking up the funds but at least computers didn't cost 2 grand.

Speaker companies felt the squeeze as the audio market peaked in 1990 and went into decline. The best way to cut costs is to make smaller speakers and consumers lost their taste for giant boxes since computers, TVs etc. take up space. If you looked at "audio style" in the late 70's and 80's, it was a matching, very large rack system that was huge! Once the big racks went away, that signaled the shift to smaller speakers and that is still true today.

Hindsite is 20/20 so CV should of adapted and went to efficient 2-ways with woofers from 6.5" to 10" and made 12 to 18" subwoofers--maybe offered PA type subs that were really efficient. Not sure if it would of helped, the college kids were heavy into computers and cell phones so audio systems were not that "cool" anymore.

I owned Cerwin-Vega 3-way 15" PA speakers for PA use 27 years ago--they were very efficient, very loud and durable for that purpose although not clean sounding. A friend of mine had the CV M series which was a giant speaker, very efficient and had fuses for the mid and self-resetting breakers for the tweeter horns. You could make your ears ring from a simple receiver, great bass for the time and sounded decent enough when not in party mode. He sold them when he got married sort of thing and wish he kept them. Great speakers to have parties, beat them because of drinking too much and making mistakes and durable for surviving your single years.

In summation, CV did not respond to the changing market in the '90's to smaller/cheaper/less efficient speakers so got taken out in 2003. The market for large, efficient speakers is not there in the consumer market, you can get them from Klipsch with a price tag to match. The closest thing at a reasonable price for a party speaker are PA speakers--basically what a CV speaker actually was. A pair of Mackie C200 10" 2-way PA speakers ($400) and a JTR 118HT ($1,400 ???) a Yamaha 100 WPC integrated amp at around $300 will set you back around $2,100 total but would be close. Swap the Yamaha for a Crown XLS1500 with it's active crossovers--mesh it with the crossover of the JTR while using some sort of pre-amp, mixer or whatever would bump the price up another $100 to $200 and you'll be in full party speaker mode but have better extension down low, better sound quality and more flexibility.

The market moves on, the big, efficient speakers are a niche' but you can still get that sort of thing without going broke by mixing PA and really efficient cinema speakers together. Or, just pick up a pair of huge JBL 4722N cinema speakers at 104dB 1w/1m and enjoy very clean sound, insane amounts of output by slapping on a PA amp to drive them. $3K for those beasts, they are ugly, huge, heavy so no style points for you.

Other people get the same thing by building their own, the DIY Sound Group has a beast with two 18" PA woofers, a 12" PA mid and a massive horn that stands about 5 feet tall. $1,800 for the kit with everything you need including the front baffle piece. You have to build the massive cabinet but if you want to kick it old school with beastly speakers but gain great sound quality that well engineered drivers offer--always an option.

Cerwin-Vega went the way of massive sound systems, it was a good time having a 20" TV and 4 foot tall speakers--but running a 7 channel with the massive Vegas would be a bit much. :eek:
I ran seven Cerwin Vega CLS 215 speakers in my previous seven channel setup. :D. I also owned a bombastic pair of JBL 4722 speakers. Good stuff.
 

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I ran seven Cerwin Vega CLS 215 speakers in my previous seven channel setup. :D. I also owned a bombastic pair of JBL 4722 speakers. Good stuff.
OK, Lumens--a few questions!

Do you consider the 4722 akin to a party speaker that has great sound? Granted, it has the WAF points of using a dumpster as a candy dish but just wondering. My view is cinema speakers are PA speakers voiced to get the best sound quality possible while still being insanely efficient. My 10" two-way mains I have now use PA drivers but has additional notch filters in the passive crossover, the compression driver is crossed over lower etc. to get the best sound quality. Built them with birch ply, made pretty magnetic grills, cabinetry and all that jazz to hide what they are. Yep, full tuxedo treatment and people really like the sound with the grills on. Along the lines of me being sexier the lower the light levels are. ;)

Always wondered what the 4722n with upgraded compression drivers and the JBL Pro 8" concentric surrounds sound like--they have to sound great, no expense was wasted to make them pretty. ;)
 
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