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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Back at CES in January, it was repeatedly stated that 3D would only add about a $300 to $500 premium over existing prices. The thing is, all we are seeing in the marketplace are displays costing around 3 grand or more. I can go to the local Best Buy, and get a decent 50 inch 1080p plasma for around $1200. So, if adding the 3D capability only really adds about $300 to $500 per tv, then why can't I buy a 50 inch 3D 1080p plasma for $1500 to $1800? Instead, we have the 50 inch Panasonic plasma selling for $2500 or $2600 or whatever.


Is this just a case of TV manufacturers trying to stick it to the hardcore early adopter types that are independently wealthy? Do you think they will sell enough of these to justify it? I'm wondering how soon these prices start falling back into the range of basically paying a premium of $400 or so above the normal price to get 3D support.


I know I could find a very nice 50 inch plasma (1080p) for around $1200 (street), and I wouldn't mind paying an additional $400 for 3D support. In other words, I wouldn't mind paying $1600 for the Panasonic TCP-P50VT20, but obviously, it's going to be a long before this is going to actually happen. You have to wonder if enough people are going to actually bite at these inflated prices...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthony1 /forum/post/18308543


Back at CES in January, it was repeatedly stated that 3D would only add about a $300 to $500 premium over existing prices. The thing is, all we are seeing in the marketplace are displays costing around 3 grand or more. I can go to the local Best Buy, and get a decent 50 inch 1080p plasma for around $1200. So, if adding the 3D capability only really adds about $300 to $500 per tv, then why can't I buy a 50 inch 3D 1080p plasma for $1500 to $1800? Instead, we have the 50 inch Panasonic plasma selling for $2500 or $2600 or whatever.


Is this just a case of TV manufacturers trying to stick it to the hardcore early adopter types that are independently wealthy? Do you think they will sell enough of these to justify it? I'm wondering how soon these prices start falling back into the range of basically paying a premium of $400 or so above the normal price to get 3D support.


I know I could find a very nice 50 inch plasma (1080p) for around $1200 (street), and I wouldn't mind paying an additional $400 for 3D support. In other words, I wouldn't mind paying $1600 for the Panasonic TCP-P50VT20, but obviously, it's going to be a long before this is going to actually happen. You have to wonder if enough people are going to actually bite at these inflated prices...

I'm guessing when Vizeo releases their3D sets later this summer you will see much closer pricing. Actually a comparable non 3D TV of the size and quality of the TCP-P50VT20 with its incredible black technology would be a $2000 TV anyway so at least for that model we are already at the $500 price add on to get 3D.
 

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The first 3D models are generally based on the company's top-of-the line 2D models and the delta cost difference is typically no more than a few hundred dollars for just the TV itself. Also if the 3D shutter glasses are included these add about $150 for each pair included. The 3D model prices cannot be compared directly to less capable budget-to-mid priced 3D models. For example the new 3D 55 inch Samsung UN55C7000 lists for $3299 and is being offered online by several dealers for $2800-$3000. In Samsung's 2D and 3D line-up of LED backlit HDTVs (directly from the Samsung web site) they have:

UN55B8000 - List $3700

UN55B7100 - List $3499

UN55C7000 - List $3299 (3D Model)

UN55B6000 - List $3299

UN55C6300 - List $2499
So how much 3D is adding to the cost all depends on what 2D model you are comparing to.


As for the Panasonic 50 inch VT20 series 3D plasma it does appear that it's price is about $1K more than their 2010 G25 series 2D plasma. However Panasonic had to develop a new generation of plasma panels to handle the 120Hz refresh rate and new phosphors and these first 3D plasmas are probably carrying a premium price to help recover those development costs.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Jones /forum/post/18308940


... the delta cost difference ...

Too bad I'd have to pay the cost. Prices so far are way too high for me. The case for 3D adding little to consumer costs is easier to make for AVRs. The HDMI 1.4 Pioneer 1020 I'm getting is only about $50 more than last year's 1.3 1019, and the addition of height or wide speaker handling is worth that difference, so the HDMI 1.4 feature really isn't going to cost me any extra. Furthermore, the lowest cost AVR in Pioneer's new line, still with HDMI 1.4 and with pre-outs for heights or wides, is moderately priced at $229.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Jones /forum/post/18308940


The first 3D models are generally based on the company's top-of-the line 2D models and the delta cost difference is typically no more than a few hundred dollars for just the TV itself. Also if the 3D shutter glasses are included these add about $150 for each pair included. The 3D model prices cannot be compared directly to less capable budget-to-mid priced 3D models. For example the new 3D 55 inch Samsung UN55C7000 lists for $3299 and is being offered online by several dealers for $2800-$3000. In Samsung's 2D and 3D line-up of LED backlit HDTVs (directly from the Samsung web site) they have:

UN55B8000 - List $3700

UN55B7100 - List $3499

UN55C7000 - List $3299 (3D Model)

UN55B6000 - List $3299

UN55C6300 - List $2499
So how much 3D is adding to the cost all depends on what 2D model you are comparing to.


As for the Panasonic 50 inch VT20 series 3D plasma it does appear that it's price is about $1K more than their 2010 G25 series 2D plasma. However Panasonic had to develop a new generation of plasma panels to handle the 120Hz refresh rate and new phosphors and these first 3D plasmas are probably carrying a premium price to help recover those development costs.

Plus the Panasonic comes with a pair of glasses, so that $1K is really about $800 after you knock off the price of the glasses and the emitter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well, for me, I'm not going to be interested until they have a 50 incher (preferably plasma) for $1499.99 including one pair of glasses. If they are proprietary. The idea of paying $150 per pair of glasses is pretty freaking crazy. The shutterglasses I have right now for my Samsung cost $44 each, plus shipping. I was told by some folks that I could have gotten some Elsa shutterglasses that would have worked just as well for around $28 each. The tv's the require proprietary glasses, only sold by the manufacturer of the tv itself are going to keep me away from buying any of those TV's. I need 4 pairs of glasses (for my family of 4), and I also need to get about 2 extra for the times when some friends come over, so at least 6 people can check it out, but at $150 per pop, that's $900 right there! If I cared less about 3D, I could get a cheapo, budget 1080p plasma for nearly $900, if I looked hard enough. I'm talking about a relatively decent display, not some Insignia brand or something.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthony1 /forum/post/18310954


Well, for me, I'm not going to be interested until they have a 50 incher (preferably plasma) for $1499.99 including one pair of glasses. If they are proprietary. The idea of paying $150 per pair of glasses is pretty freaking crazy. The shutterglasses I have right now for my Samsung cost $44 each, plus shipping. I was told by some folks that I could have gotten some Elsa shutterglasses that would have worked just as well for around $28 each. The tv's the require proprietary glasses, only sold by the manufacturer of the tv itself are going to keep me away from buying any of those TV's. I need 4 pairs of glasses (for my family of 4), and I also need to get about 2 extra for the times when some friends come over, so at least 6 people can check it out, but at $150 per pop, that's $900 right there! If I cared less about 3D, I could get a cheapo, budget 1080p plasma for nearly $900, if I looked hard enough. I'm talking about a relatively decent display, not some Insignia brand or something.

LOL - Sept 1999 is your join date huh? I was here in 1999 (under another name). You don't remember all the discussions of how expensive HDTV's were?


In comparison, these 3DTV's are CHEAP!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·

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Originally Posted by Lee Stewart /forum/post/18310989


LOL - Sept 1999 is your join date huh? I was here in 1999 (under another name). You don't remember all the discussions of how expensive HDTV's were?


In comparison, these 3DTV's are CHEAP!

Oh I remember. I was one of the lucky few that ended up getting one of those Unity Motion Direct View HDTV's for around $850 shipped. Do you remember those rebadged Princeton Graphics direct views? Unity Motion went bankrupt and their liquidator was selling them for like $850 via the net. It was an absolute steal at the time. It was a $4,000 TV that people were getting for $850. I still have mine in the master bedroom, and it's still going strong, lol.


As for these current 3DTV's being cheap, that depends on your definition of cheap. I'm very much into higher end audio and video gear, but at the same time, I'm far from wealthy, and I need to pinch my pennies as much as I can. I'll be waiting quite a while for a front projector and 50 inch plasma to come into my price zone.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthony1 /forum/post/18311036


Oh I remember. I was one of the lucky few that ended up getting one of those Unity Motion Direct View HDTV's for around $850 shipped. Do you remember those rebadged Princeton Graphics direct views? Unity Motion went bankrupt and their liquidator was selling them for like $850 via the net. It was an absolute steal at the time. It was a $4,000 TV that people were getting for $850. I still have mine in the master bedroom, and it's still going strong, lol.

Most of the people (myself included) were using FPTV's for HDTV - what little there was of it. Line doublers and triplers for DVD was the hot topic - had a LD'er too. My HDTV setup - FPTV, 144" 16x9 screen and Line Doubler cost me $13,000.

Quote:
As for these current 3DTV's being cheap, that depends on your definition of cheap. I'm very much into higher end audio and video gear, but at the same time, I'm far from wealthy, and I need to pinch my pennies as much as I can. I'll be waiting quite a while for a front projector and 50 inch plasma to come into my price zone.

Well - that's you. In 2006, I paid $2200 for a Samsung 5053 - a 768P PDP. Now for $300 more, I can get a Panasonic 50" 3DTV which is also a 1080P HDTV and I get a set of glasses to boot. Waiting for the 58" or 65"


If we compare the cost of 3DTV's first models to the first models of Color TV's and HDTV's - there just isn't a comparison.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart /forum/post/18311101


Most of the people (myself included) were using FPTV's for HDTV - what little there was of it. Line doublers and triplers for DVD was the hot topic - had a LD'er too. My HDTV setup - FPTV, 144" 16x9 screen and Line Doubler cost me $13,000.

I didn't discover the joys of front projection until around 2003 or 2004 I think. My first projector was a lowly Infocus X1. Still, it was decent with regular DVD movies and the original Xbox. I've had projectors ever since. Now that I've had a front projector, there's no going back to the days of regular tv's. Of course, you still gotta have a regular TV somewhere in your house, for the times when you want to just watch something for 30 or 45 minutes and don't want to fire up the beamer.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthony1 /forum/post/18308543


Is this just a case of TV manufacturers trying to stick it to the hardcore early adopter types that are independently wealthy?

Yes.
Quote:
Do you think they will sell enough of these to justify it?

Yes. That's why they call it the "low-hanging fruit."
Quote:
I'm wondering how soon these prices start falling back into the range of basically paying a premium of $400 or so above the normal price to get 3D support.

October.
 

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The Samsung PN50C7000 is just over $1,600 on some sites for pre-order. That's 50" and 3d.


I haven't seen it on their site, but I read in another thread that there is going to be a promotion for 2 free glasses and blu-ray player for these sets.
 

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It's worth mentioning that the Panasonic 50" 720p sets two years ago (PX80U) were $1500 in March.


They ended up around $900 in November.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJChris /forum/post/18320773


The Samsung PN50C7000 is just over $1,600 on some sites for pre-order. That's 50" and 3d.


I haven't seen it on their site, but I read in another thread that there is going to be a promotion for 2 free glasses and blu-ray player for these sets.

There is/was a promotion where you buy a 3DTV and a 3D BD player - you get the 3D starter kit free which includes 2 pair of glasses and the M v A 3D BD - a $349 value. That was being offered at Best Buy. Unknown for E-sellers.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthony1 /forum/post/18311036


Oh I remember. I was one of the lucky few that ended up getting one of those Unity Motion Direct View HDTV's for around $850 shipped. Do you remember those rebadged Princeton Graphics direct views?

Good ol' days


3D ready


HL67A750 from Vanns at $1729
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Jones /forum/post/18308940


As for the Panasonic 50 inch VT20 series 3D plasma it does appear that it's price is about $1K more than their 2010 G25 series 2D plasma. However Panasonic had to develop a new generation of plasma panels to handle the 120Hz refresh rate and new phosphors and these first 3D plasmas are probably carrying a premium price to help recover those development costs.

Wouldn't it be more accurate to compare the VT20 to last years V10 which sold for over 2k? The V series is the flagship, not the G series. Panasonic has been very agressive with their pricing (perhaps because they feel guilty about their black level issues
). If the V10 sold for ~$2200 or more that is an amazing price for a better 2D TV (better blacks and color from what we've read thusfar) and they throw in 3D technology and a pair of glasses. The increase is cost is very very small with the Panny and you get one of the highest rated 2D sets at 2010 CES. Oh yeah that was before the asterisks came out about the reveiws of the Panny but that's a bit offtopic
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart /forum/post/18311101


Most of the people (myself included) were using FPTV's for HDTV - what little there was of it. Line doublers and triplers for DVD was the hot topic - had a LD'er too. My HDTV setup - FPTV, 144" 16x9 screen and Line Doubler cost me $13,000.

Along those same lines... I bought a 50" Sony 50XBR950 Plasma about 6 years ago for $10,000. It was the top of the line "Rolls Royce" of it's time and here we are a few years later and I have the most expensive 720p S-Video CPU monitor ever! It actually still looks beautiful (awesome floating glass design) but is only worth about as much as a new PS3. I really do hate technology sometimes.


Back on topic...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr_Who /forum/post/18322090

Wouldn't it be more accurate to compare the VT20 to last years V10 which sold for over 2k? The V series is the flagship, not the G series. Panasonic has been very agressive with their pricing (perhaps because they feel guilty about their black level issues
). If the V10 sold for ~$2200 or more that is an amazing price for a better 2D TV (better blacks and color from what we've read thusfar) and they throw in 3D technology and a pair of glasses. The increase is cost is very very small with the Panny and you get one of the highest rated 2D sets at 2010 CES. Oh yeah that was before the asterisks came out about the reveiws of the Panny but that's a bit offtopic

I had considered that but since the new Panasonic 3D is a 2010 model I decided to use the nearest annouced 2010 2D model for comparison (even though most dealers still are selling the 2009 2D models).
 

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The MSRP for the Samsung 3D 46C750 model coming out later this spring is several hudred dollars then the current MSRP for the current 46B750 model.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by walford /forum/post/18322958


The MSRP for the Samsung 3D 46C750 model coming out later this spring is several hudred dollars then the current MSRP for the current 46B750 model.

The new 50" 3DTV is cheaper by $300 than the regular 50". But it is a Series 7 versus a Series 8 and $200 more than a 50" Series 6.

http://www.samsung.com/us/consumer/t...getype=subtype
 
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