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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am trying to figure this out.


I just got Comcast BASIC cable installed in my home. Prior to this, I had antenna TV running to my whole house. The coax lines were already there when I hooked up the antenna. I just unhooked Comcast's line (service was off at that time) from the splitters running the lines to my home and hooked my antenna line in.


In order to get a decent price on their internet, I had to get basic cable installed. I unhooked my antenna line, and hooked their line back up to the splitters running the lines to my home.


Yesterday when I arrived home (my roommate was there for the installation), I was not able to receive any signals in my bedrooms, only the living room. And the cable signal in the living room (of course) is only picking up the MOST BASIC of cable. Analog signals from 1-22.


Upon inspecting the lines, I was able to determine that Comcast had unhooked all of the lines running to my house from my splitters and had tied in the living room line only with a coupling to their line.


I am thinking that this coupling is somehow allowing only analog signals through, which is why all of my other lines were disconnected. I don't know enough about connectors to know if this is correct, but I'm trying to figure out what my next step is.


So I suppose my question is, is there such a thing as a connector that allows only analog signals through it?


Thanks guys and gals!


B>
 

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A few questions.

Where is the modem located in your home and is it working?

The modem needs a digital signal to lock onto and receive data.

i doubt they would put a filter in line for that reason.


This coupler you mentioned is anything written on it?
 

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What kind of cable do you have running in your house?


I remember when comcast came and looked at our house for digital cable and basically re-did the whole home with RG6 vs the original RG5 in my house, as the RG5 couldn't handle the bandwidth of the internet and TV. This may be what happened.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The modem is located in my living room and it IS working properly, in fact it's working VERY nicely.


The coupling didn't have anything written on it that I saw. It looked like just a small, metal cable coupling.


BTW, thank you for replying.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
To be honest I am unsure what the lines running in my home are. I don't believe that they are maybe more than a few years old.


Gray line, slightly thicker than the standard black cable lines that you'd use to run from the box to the TV & such. Actually, gray line with blue around the ends where the lines attach.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rendelf /forum/post/18160928


To be honest I am unsure what the lines running in my home are. I don't believe that they are maybe more than a few years old.


Gray line, slightly thicker than the standard black cable lines that you'd use to run from the box to the TV & such. Actually, gray line with blue around the ends where the lines attach.

Perhaps the attached photo might be helpful.


At the left are three splitters. From the top may be seen an obsolete "analog" 5-900 MHZ splitter, in the center a "digital" 5MHz-1 GHz splitter and at the bottom a "digital" 5-2300 MHz splitter. The 5MHz-1GHz splitter is the current standard for use with digital cable.


At the right are two typical coax cables. From the left there is an old RG59U coax cable and at the right is a current Quad Shielded RG6U coax cable. The Quad Shielded RG6U coax cable is the current standard for use with digital cable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the pics and info.


For the cable lines, mine definitely looks more like the one on the right. So, I should be good as far as the lines go.


As for the splitter, there isn't one. I am just coupled directly into Comcast's line coming from the pole.
 

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First I would look at the cable modem diagnostic screen.

What type of modem is it? (manufacturer)

In your browser type 192.168.100.1

You should see a diagnostic screen look through the tabs until you find the up and downstream parameters, you are looking for downstream and upstream power and frequency.

Record these numbers and post them here.
 

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1) They installed a trap. This will block all channels above ~22. This is normal for your subscription (limited basic/antenna service).


2) They disonnected the additional splitters since your installation fee probably only covered one (primary) TV and the modem for internet.


3) They usually install a two-way splitter. One leg for the primary TV, the other for the modem.


4) You have two options from here:

a) reattach the TV/video leg from the two-way to the original splitter(s) to service the bedroom TV's.

b) call Comcast to connect the other TV's (which they will probably charge a fee for installation).


If you have a digital camera, some photos would be helpful.
 

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Whether they "fudged" it or not... give them a call and see what can be done (without a fee).


Also, the OP can reattach the antenna to the splitter for the bedroom TV's.
 
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