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I think it is part of the speaker that surrounds the piston and causes the cone to vibrate when it receives power. I think it is fixed in position, but is it part of the moving part of the speaker?


I also know that subwoofers with built in crossovers put 2 on one speaker.
 

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A voice coil is a coil of wire, wound around a hollow tube that is attached to the speaker cone. The hollow tube and the coil of wire sits down in the gap of the magnet structure (pole piece in the middle of the tube, the magnet you see around the outside).


When an AC signal (your music) flows through the coil of wire, it forms a electromagnetic field and the coil moves make and forth, porportional to the AC current. The positive half of the waveform makes the cone move out; the negative half of the waveform makes the cone move in.


Dual voice coil drivers have two coils wound concentrically, each with its own pair of inputs. It allows you to drive a single speaker with two amplifier channels, each channel driving one coil. Dual voice coils have nothing to do with the presence or absence of a crossover. You could have a dual voice coil tweeter if you wanted to, however, you really don't want a dual voice coil driver driven by an actual stereo signal because the two coils might be trying to move the driver in opposite directions at the same time. Ideally, you want a mono signal driving the two coils.
 

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"...and that's all I have to say about that."


Think of a speaker as a linear-motion electric motor.
 
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