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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I thought I was a know-it-all, but what is C-band? I can't believe I haven't heard about this?
 

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C-Band is for the dishes in which we use to call BUDs. This stands for Big Ugly Dish. The C-Band is for the big dishes. Most of the TV stations will have big dishes that send signals to satellites that are in the C (which stands for Clark)-band. Even Directv satellites are connected to the satellites that are in the C-Band.
 

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I attached a C-band dish picture, actually KU also. Note how I hid it behind a Butterfly Bush



Tons of programming available on a BUD (BigUsefulDish
)


Cable Co's, D*, E* all use C-band for thier sources before they compress it to death and resell it to you..


Jim
 

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Actually, C band refers to the radio frequencies used (3.7 to 4.2 GHz). The DirectTV and Dish Network satellites use the Ku band (500 MHz segments of 10.7-12.2 GHz). The satellites are in the "Clarke belt", a region above the earth's equator where satellites can sit in 'geostationary' orbit. Yes, the video quality of the analog original C-band signals blows away the LSD pictures.
 

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Not only do they (cable and DBS) take C-band as the original source, they often will use OTA analog for the locals........but, they can always rubber-stamp "DIGITAL" on them and no one knows the difference. (Sort of like "digital-ready" headphones, speakers, clock radios, toaster ovens, lawnmowers, fireplaces, pets, sprinklers, shovels, .......................................)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
ok you need a ten foot dish on atleast a 6' pole


a 922


a HDD200


and your all set? is there monthly charge? i mean how do you get access?
 

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BUD provides better PQ than DBS (DBS and cable get much of their programing from C-Band), BUD programming is now mostly digital and more programming, including HD, to choose from than DBS or cable. However, there are some limitations as a home subscriber. One receiver per account only, changing channels can take several seconds to move the dish to that channels sat location, you most likely have to be rural to install a BUD, and typically live outside any city limit. NFL Ticket is no longer available to BUD subscribers.


Though BUD subscribers number under 1m according to Sky Report, it appears some rurals have now returned to BUD when their DBS distant networks where moved to spot beam and there location did not fall into the spot beam foot print. I also remember reading about another C-Band satellite launch recently, so I would suspect that C-Band is not dead, especially since several on-line retailers have now added C-Band to their line-up. I believe Big Dish and 4DTV are the predominate BUD programming providers.
 

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 http://www.4dtv.com
http://www.4dtv.com/Xcel/xcel.htm
http://www.4dtv.com/HDTV/HDD200.html


If you qualify and understand the restrictions, the 4DTV people are very helpfull and will connect you with a local installer. C-Band dish design is pretty much black mesh these days. I know, I had one at our old house. You will find that C-Band programming is a bit less than DBS. It was the 2nd receiver is a 2nd account rule that caused many of us to leave, not the promos from Direct and Dish to join in.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by ps24eva
is HDTV's original source (Discovery HD etc.) also C-Band?
Most C and KU band digital programming uses

Motorola's digicipher format. This can be decoded

by the 4DTV with the HDD-200 decoder for HDTV

programs. This includes Discovery, HBO and

Showtime east and west feeds. ESPN uses a

different format of digicipher which cannot be

decoded by any consumer receiver. Most network

feeds are transmitted in MPEG and cannot be

received by the 4DTV but only by the Integra.
 

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You can also insatall Ku-band LNB's and catch digital SNG (satelite news gathering) live shots from the field. You have to know the frequency, data parameters however. A spectrum monitor helps a lot. On weekends, you can watch a TON of in-the-clear analog feeds of college football. You also can install a DSS LNB and point your BUD at the DSS birds too. You won't have many rain problems if you watch DirecTV with a 3.5M dish! :)
 

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This is interesting. What about commercials? Does the first generation signal carry commercials, or are they added by the carrier? I was watching a football game while on a cruise a couple years ago, and during the commercial break the screen would go black but I could hear John Madden and Pat Summerall shooting the breeze in the backround. Is this what I was getting, the "first generation" satellite feed?
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Chriš
This is interesting. What about commercials? Does the first generation signal carry commercials, or are they added by the carrier? I was watching a football game while on a cruise a couple years ago, and during the commercial break the screen would go black but I could hear John Madden and Pat Summerall shooting the breeze in the backround. Is this what I was getting, the "first generation" satellite feed?
Yes, you were watching a wildfeed that is sent directly from the stadium without commercials. I watched the Cal/Illinois game just over a week ago via C-band, and it's always interesting to hear all the chatter from the commentators during commercial breaks. The screen doesn't always go dark during commercials. I watched part of a game this past weekend and the cameraman was highlighting the nicest views in the stands during comercial breaks. It was nice to see just how powerful those zoom lenses can be....:D


R8der
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by kenglish
Not only do they (cable and DBS) take C-band as the original source, they often will use OTA analog for the locals........but, they can always rubber-stamp "DIGITAL" on them and no one knows the difference.
Anyone know the mix of analog/digital used for C-band? Are programmers/networks distributing mostly in Rec. 601 (digital YCbCr) or another format; who's using analog? With a good set, shouldn't you be able to distinguish between video derived from OTA NTSC (composite B&W/color, 480X440) and that from Rec.601 (component 480X720)? Thanks. -- John
 

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I've owned a C-band dish since the mid eighties. For the true Videophile there is no finer source for HD and SD proggramming. I watch on a 10ft. 4x3 screen using a front projector. HD from Discovery, Showtime or HBO is the only way to go. Buy a Motorola 922, an HDD200/201 and a C-band dish and you will finally have a source worthy of your expensive reproduction equipment.
 

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I'd love to hear the Home Owner's Associations takes on C-band dishes

out there... are they covered by the FCC ruling also?


That would be a huge uphill battle to use one of those in a newer subdivision. :)
 

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USCboy the issue is not whether it is legal or even possible. If u want the best you can find a way.
 

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Wow! This is a pretty interesting topic/thread. Just out of curiosity, about what is the cost to get setup with a C-Band setup?


I have heard of C-Band. Knew it involved a big dish, but that is all. We live on 10 open acres so a big dish is no big deal around here.


Chris
 

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Using Ebay and the 4DTV forum about $2,000. In 1986 I spent $6,000 to get into it. Go to Satforums.com or 4DTV forum for lots of info.
 
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