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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know Java is supposed to add more interactivity but what specifically are its advantages? My Batman the Dark Knight takes forever, ok 2 minutes, to load. I just don't see what Java is adding.
 

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Java is a programming language. As a language, it has it's strengths and weaknesses. In terms of blu ray, the fact that blu ray supports an actual programming language means that developers have the ability to do some very complicated things in software. But it also means that the blu ray player has a lot of work to do to run the java programs on your blu ray discs, which can lead to slow performance like you're seeing on your player. Decks with more processing power available load much quicker- Dark Knight loads in less than 10 seconds or so on my PS3, for instance . . . . .
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
With the Dark Knight, I didn't notice the menus being any sexier than some of my other blu ray discs. My Sony 350 generally loads movies reasonably quick, I just don't like over a minute waits.
 

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It is capable of doing things like graphics transparency, dual subtitles and changeable subtitle fonts; actually some of the stuff BD-J can do can also be done with HDMV - more details in the Blu-ray Disc Spec whitepaper. At present I think the lack of standards, programming level and hardware isn't up to it so I'd rather have simple disc that loads fast, plays and does resume play rather than over-fanciful menus.
 

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All of the above, when it works like it is supposed to. In reality, Java is really only good for doing two things consistantly:


1) It has a talent for throwing exceptions when it comes across something it doesn't like, much like when any other programming language errors out. Java, however, goes one step further: Most other languages simply stop execution when a run-time error is encountered; Java crashes the entire server, requiring a reboot (this is what you see on the blu-ray player when it hangs and the only way out is to unplug the unit)


2) It is slower than sin, and the Blu-Ray implementation has absolutely no set of standards (thus the frequent FW upgrades); On the bright side, it is a hair faster than Applesoft Basic...



In a nutshell, the BDA would have had to work hard to make a worse choice for a platform to base Blu-Ray on...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vader424242 /forum/post/15449290


All of the above, when it works like it is supposed to. In reality, Java is really only good for doing two things consistantly:


1) It has a talent for throwing exceptions when it comes across something it doesn't like, much like when any other programming language errors out. Java, however, goes one step further: Most other languages simply stop execution when a run-time error is encountered; Java crashes the entire server, requiring a reboot (this is what you see on the blu-ray player when it hangs and the only way out is to unplug the unit)


2) It is slower than sin, and the Blu-Ray implementation has absolutely no set of standards (thus the frequent FW upgrades); On the bright side, it is a hair faster than Applesoft Basic...



In a nutshell, the BDA would have had to work hard to make a worse choice for a platform to base Blu-Ray on...

Vader,


I don't know who wrote the JAVA for your deathstar, but that's not how JAVA works in our shop.


A NULL pointer exception for example, can cause a stack trace dump, but I have yet to see it force a server reboot.


Now, if you want some exceptional crashes, you should try using old style C, with its pointers and the like. There I did manage to get the server to reboot...



I do agree that JAVA was not developed with BDs in mind and really has no place being on a disc. The BD world should really have looked at the way that SD DVD did theirs and pretty much stuck with that.


Seggers
 

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It is good for nothing!!!. I am kidding, but there are problems using it on Blu-Ray disks.

It seems that quite a bit of processing power is necessary for JAVA to run and that is probably the reason why it slows things up. I wonder if they could have achieved the same results without using JAVA. HDDVD did not use it and the menus were much faster. Having said the above, I believe that future players will have greater processing power and it might also be possible to develop a JAVA light version to work on Blu-Ray players.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by seggers /forum/post/15449389


Now, if you want some exceptional crashes, you should try using old style C, with its pointers and the like. There I did manage to get the server to reboot...



I do agree that JAVA was not developed with BDs in mind and really has no place being on a disc. The BD world should really have looked at the way that SD DVD did theirs and pretty much stuck with that.

I concur on all counts...


Quote:
Originally Posted by rwestley /forum/post/15449911


HDDVD did not use it and the menus were much faster.

HD DVD used HDi, which ironically was co-developed by Disney. The "problem" with HDi was that it could not support BD+ (so the paranoid execs at FOX shot it down).
 

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I wish Blu-Rays offered a quick-loading simpler menu in addition to any slow loading fancy JAVA menu, to make it easier to just play a movie fast. Like come up with a quick selection quick vs slow and then go from there!
 

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To quote an old song


What is Java good for

Absolutely nothing


It is the bane of web browsing and seems to be a real mess with Blu too.
 

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Sony 's in bed with Java.Its called kickbacks.Amazing,this blu ray,better picture,better sound,larger storage,freakin slower load times.The slower load times are enough to turn people off to this format.Its perfect for people like Hugh Hefner,put in a movie,get laid and then watch the movie.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vader424242 /forum/post/15450140


HD DVD used HDi, which ironically was co-developed by Disney. The "problem" with HDi was that it could not support BD+ (so the paranoid execs at FOX shot it down).

I don't understand why the studios don't just write a Java app that renders HDi. The could continue to use the HDi tools for menus and interactivity and access BD-J for those items that HDi just can't do. I suspect that Universal did just that, but haven't seen anything to back that up.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by webdev511 /forum/post/15454944


I don't understand why the studios don't just write a Java app that renders HDi. The could continue to use the HDi tools for menus and interactivity and access BD-J for those items that HDi just can't do. I suspect that Universal did just that, but haven't seen anything to back that up.

HDi, from the rival format, is not mentioned in the Blu-ray Disc spec so I rather doubt it. Isn't it making it more complicated? As I said, actually some of the stuff BD-J can do can also be done with HDMV, but I don't know if HDMV mode is simpler and quicker.
 
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