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I currently have a WRT54G and I get weak signals.


I have the new xbox slim with wireless N as well as the boxee box with wireless N



what is the best router out there? and affordable would be a plus as well
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by xsabrewulf /forum/post/19572450


I currently have a WRT54G and I get weak signals.


I have the new xbox slim with wireless N as well as the boxee box with wireless N



what is the best router out there? and affordable would be a plus as well

Netgears seem to be more media player friendly than Cisco Linksys.


Using NETGEAR Routers:

If you want good throughput wireless-N Streaming make sure you use WPA2 encryption and not allow wireless G or any other devices without wifi-n to connect. Make sure you set the settings to Max 300Mbps too...


Using Cisco Linksys Routers:

Set Channel Width to 40MHz (prevents non-wirelss-N devices from connecting - Netgears do not have this feature because it does it automatically but sets channel width to 20Mhz to allow wifi G devices to connect)

Use WPA2 Encryption.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sgvroadster /forum/post/19591168


Netgears seem to be more media player friendly than Cisco Linksys.


Using NETGEAR Routers:

If you want good throughput wireless-N Streaming make sure you use WPA2 encryption and not allow wireless G or any other devices without wifi-n to connect. Make sure you set the settings to Max 300Mbps too...


Using Cisco Linksys Routers:

Set Channel Width to 40MHz (prevents non-wirelss-N devices from connecting - Netgears do not have this feature because it does it automatically but sets channel width to 20Mhz to allow wifi G devices to connect)

Use WPA2 Encryption.

This is great advice, so long as you have a purely N-connected network, however, most folks have a smartphone, Nintendo Wii, Ps3, etc., that need a wireless-G connection as well.


If you use the Netgear, for example, w/ a channel bandwidth of 20Mhz, your blazing-fast wireless-n 300mbps is most likely going to be cut in half immediately.


That being said, I mention this for purely educational reasons. It looks as though this poster's particular set-up will be fine.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by oneway23 /forum/post/19591536


This is great advice, so long as you have a purely N-connected network, however, most folks have a smartphone, Nintendo Wii, Ps3, etc., that need a wireless-G connection as well.


If you use the Netgear, for example, w/ a channel bandwidth of 20Mhz, your blazing-fast wireless-n 300mbps is most likely going to be cut in half immediately.


That being said, I mention this for purely educational reasons. It looks as though this poster's particular set-up will be fine.

Agreed. That is why I split my wireless networks into N only and G only, as recommended by on SmallNetBuilder.com


The G router Linksys (WRT54G2) cost around $50, and my one N client (laptop) runs much faster!


Mark
 

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In our experience, when it comes to WiFi, quantity can sometimes make up for quality. Instead of having one good router, have several average but solid routers can provide as good or better coverage. Even the best routers have difficulty reaching across floors and walls. But if you can run a wired backbone, and install 2-3 solid routers, especially one that's fairly close to your media streaming devices, the results can be pretty good.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by oneway23 /forum/post/0



This is great advice, so long as you have a purely N-connected network, however, most folks have a smartphone, Nintendo Wii, Ps3, etc., that need a wireless-G connection as well.


If you use the Netgear, for example, w/ a channel bandwidth of 20Mhz, your blazing-fast wireless-n 300mbps is most likely going to be cut in half immediately.


That being said, I mention this for purely educational reasons. It looks as though this poster's particular set-up will be fine.

Points here are spot on. If you look for a router that is either dual band. And or has the ability to create guest video networks you can isolate the streaming over a dedicated portion of the wireless bandwidth. Check out the Netgear WNDR3700. It is the best media router per Maximum PC magazine and I personally agree. Many in this forum use this router. It is expensive @$149 but worth it.


Bob Silver Netgear
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobsilver /forum/post/19622985


Points here are spot on. If you look for a router that is either dual band. And or has the ability to create guest video networks you can isolate the streaming over a dedicated portion of the wireless bandwidth. Check out the Netgear WNDR3700. It is the best media router per Maximum PC magazine and I personally agree. Many in this forum use this router. It is expensive @$149 but worth it.


Bob Silver Netgear

Bob,


Can you drop us a morsel of a hint when the V2 of this router is coming?

We know it's right around the corner sometime, but details are sparse.

I don't want to have to go with a competitor, but I don't want to wait 4 months either.


Any hints?


thanks!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobsilver
Points here are spot on. If you look for a router that is either dual band. And or has the ability to create guest video networks you can isolate the streaming over a dedicated portion of the wireless bandwidth. Check out the Netgear WNDR3700. It is the best media router per Maximum PC magazine and I personally agree. Many in this forum use this router. It is expensive @$149 but worth it.


Bob Silver Netgear
I agree... I went through a Linksys E1000 (rebranded WRT160), Linksys E2000, Linksys E3000 (rebranded WRT600) and I forgot what models of D-Links(I think Fry's have me on file now for returning too many routers)... and they all were not media player friendly or streaming media friendly... I bought a NETGEAR WNDR3700 and have not looked back yet - once I installed it and got it up and running all my shared devices showed up immediately! Throughput speeds were better than any of the Cisco Linksys routers... I tried the WNDR3700 and I was surprised its built-in NAS features (via connected USB external DD) streamed pretty well over wired ethernet or from wifi-N...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobsilver /forum/post/19622985


Points here are spot on. If you look for a router that is either dual band. And or has the ability to create guest video networks you can isolate the streaming over a dedicated portion of the wireless bandwidth. Check out the Netgear WNDR3700. It is the best media router per Maximum PC magazine and I personally agree. Many in this forum use this router. It is expensive @$149 but worth it.


Bob Silver Netgear

Bob, I must admit that I'm a bit confused. I certainly don't raise this point in a spirit of contention, rather, I'm trying to educate myself as much as possible.


I've read earlier in the thread that the Netgear WNDR3700 is incapable of selecting the 40MHz channel. If this is so, is one not still completely killing the speed one is paying for, even if running on the 5 GHz band?


My understanding is that you need three factors for optimal wireless-N


1. The 5 GHz band

2. The 40MHz channel

3. Your clients N card configured to the 40MHz channel


If I'm describing this accurately, and if what I've read about the Netgear is true, how does the Netgear WNDR3700 achieve optimal throughput if the 40MHz channel is not selectable?
 
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