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as far as i understand BE engine is an ad/DA converter, however in some web pages its claimed that BE engine adds another frame between source frames.

i did not really believe that, anyway then its utilized if used in tvs which are 100/120 hz and not 50/60 hz? Is there anything else the BE does?

and is it any useful if a dvd movie already upscaled to 1080p by a player or a pc?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by zamazingo /forum/post/18201086


as far as i understand BE engine is an ad/DA converter, however in some web pages its claimed that BE engine adds another frame between source frames.

i did not really believe that, anyway then its utilized if used in tvs which are 100/120 hz and not 50/60 hz? Is there anything else the BE does?

and is it any useful if a dvd movie already upscaled to 1080p by a player or a pc?

Here's a link that explains the different types pretty well. I have BE3 on my "Z" which gives excellent PQ detail and depth. Me thinks your confusing it with Motionflow.


Click the 8 Steps to Better PQ "See the Difference" and it provides an excellent Flash demo of what BE does.

http://www.sony.co.uk/hub/bravia-lcd-televisions/5/2
 

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it's just sony's marketing name for their video processing circuitry that is in every TV sold today.


as westa said already the frame insertion mode is the motion enhancer and sony calls there's motionflow 120/240hz
 

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I think it's the brave little engine that could (climb the mountain).
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by zamazingo /forum/post/18201086


as far as i understand BE engine is an ad/DA converter, however in some web pages its claimed that BE engine adds another frame between source frames.

i did not really believe that, anyway then its utilized if used in tvs which are 100/120 hz and not 50/60 hz? Is there anything else the BE does?

and is it any useful if a dvd movie already upscaled to 1080p by a player or a pc?

nothing to do with A/D or D/A converters...


It is a combination of hardware and programming: processor that uses RAM and algorithm to generate an extra frame based on n frame and n+1 frame received from AV board. All that resides on T-CON board (timing control board). There's also driving circuitry to drive the LCD panel itself.


Interpolated frame can only be generated once the n+1 frame is received and stored - hence (one of the major reasons for) the input lag


Boky
 

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Every TV sold from every brand has a BRAVIA Engine, only they call its something else, and most likely its not as good as Sony's. Regardless its still the video math processor all its doing is math. Its unlikey that even Sony's makes its own BRAVIA Engine chip some 3rd party possibly makes it for them. And Samsung's "Bravia Engine is way better anyways. Side by side I was watching the Winter Olympics on a 46 Sony XBR Bravia Engine 3, and on a Samsung LN40B630, and During graphics, and motion the Sony showed Jaggies or rough edges on slanted lines, while the Samsung's Bravia Engine (they don't give it a name) Processed everything with no jaggies or rough edges it was all smooth.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ice Cold /forum/post/18209288


Every TV sold from every brand has a BRAVIA Engine, only they call its something else, and most likely its not as good as Sony's. Regardless its still the video math processor all its doing is math. Its unlikey that even Sony's makes its own BRAVIA Engine chip some 3rd party possibly makes it for them. And Samsung's "Bravia Engine is way better anyways. Side by side I was watching the Winter Olympics on a 46 Sony XBR Bravia Engine 3, and on a Samsung LN40B630, and During graphics, and motion the Sony showed Jaggies or rough edges on slanted lines, while the Samsung's Bravia Engine (they don't give it a name) Processed everything with no jaggies or rough edges it was all smooth.

Actually Samsung calls it DNIE+ and works with Wide Color Enhancement 2/3.

Sony's processing is definitely one of the best among the other processors because of it's lower input and upscaling of SD material. Samsung however does a bit better in interlaced video's.


There is nothing like whats equivalent to BE3 in Samsung, each processor has their pros and cons.
 

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In the Samsungs, video processing is very good and the deinterlacing is exceptional. Where I see issues is with its cadence detection, it can be a bit slow in catching the cadence if the cadence changes in the source. I see this happen on live sports broadcast in 1080i when the video changes to slow motion replays and then back, and also on 1080i sports and news channels where there is alot of video overlays on top of the live video. Film deinterlacing in the Samsungs is solid.
 

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Everyone has video processors to upscale the video content. Most use the AMD processors and there are various levels of this. It all has to do with the software and how it uses the features of the processor. After that, it's all about the frame conversion to 120 or 240HZ which has nothing to do with the video processor and is performed in the TCON circuits. The "Bravia Engine" in Sony televisions is a culmination of the above.
 

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Sony improved on the great benefits of the bravia engine by adding a picture quality enhancement circuit called Digital Reality Creation Multi-function v2.5(or DRC-MFv2.5).This gives the TV the ability to process interlace and progressive video signals and because it has twice the processing power of previous DRC-MF circuits, it can do its processing and output them to 1080p.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adonis Gotam /forum/post/18215381


Sony improved on the great benefits of the bravia engine by adding a picture quality enhancement circuit called Digital Reality Creation Multi-function v2.5(or DRC-MFv2.5).This gives the TV the ability to process interlace and progressive video signals and because it has twice the processing power of previous DRC-MF circuits, it can do its processing and output them to 1080p.

The external DRC has not been used in Sony televisions for over 2 1/2 years. Everything is handled by the AMD. This year, the EMMA processor is being used in lieu of the AMD.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by display veteran /forum/post/18219782


The external DRC has not been used in Sony televisions for over 2 1/2 years. Everything is handled by the AMD. This year, the EMMA processor is being used in lieu of the AMD.

ooo, i wonder if it will lower input lag on their TV's



I think the main problem with lag and sony/samsung TV's is the aggressive RTC they use to attempt to remove blurring, they really should turn it down a couple notches in game mode like Toshiba and sharp's do
 

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An EMMA processor? That's NEC.

Where did you hear that info from?


It might be a EMMA2RH, which lower cost production but provide the ability to simultaneously decode up to 2 streams in HD video playback as a basic feature. It can allot processing on 2 streams of SD-quality that can be realized. Let alone be capable of handling both Digital HD and the existing analog broadcasting.


The real good news beyond that is that NEC might incorporate "NEC Super Resolution" into EMMA... so it's just like a DRC!
 
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