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A 3D ready TV does not have any internal tuners that will accept a 3D broadcast signal A standalone tuner has to receive the 3D content and send it to the the TV using a video 3D interface such as HDMI,VDI,VGA,Component, or Checkerboard.

A 3D TV has one or more tuners that can also accept 3D content in a broadcast format.
 

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I am not sure where Walford’s definition came from but it is misleading. It sounds more like the old HDTV vs. HD Ready TV definition just substituting 3D for HD. This was where the “tuner” may or may not be present in the TV. The industry trade groups have not provided a full definition of terms for 3D TVs and there also are no definitions created by government agencies. There is only each manufacturer’s definition and common practices so there are no 100% accurate answers to the question. In general, a 3D TV is a TV that accepts multiple standard types of 3D signals. The minimum is usually the HDMI 1.4a mandatory 3D signal formats. However this standard applies only to 3D signals over an HDMI cable. More capability and signal compatibility is not ruled out but also not promised. Some of these TVs can also accept 3D via an internet connection however at this time the internet services 3D formats are less standard than HDMI and so not universal. There are no standards for “broadcast” 3D when it comes to the TV via an over-the-air broadcast which requires the use of an antenna. That would be the only place where a “tuner” would apply. ATSC is now investigating standards for over-the-air 3D at this time. Since there are no standards, there are no TVs that have “tuners” that receive 3D. All cable and all satellite broadcasts of 3D require the use of a cable box or satellite receiver and the “tuner” is in that device, not the TV. They then normally transfer the signal over HDMI using the HDMI 1.4a standards. A 3D Ready TV is usually one that is more limited in the compatible signals than the HDMI 1.4a formats; normally to 1 or 2 formats only. Most of these were designed and introduced before the HDMI 1.4a 3D standards were finalized. The term 3D Capable is even more vague, some use it as the same as 3D TV and some use it as the same as 3D Ready.
 

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In the case of the last 3 years (pre 2011) Mitsubishi DLPs 3D ready meant you needed their adaptor box to convert side by side(SBS) or top to bottom(TTB) signals to checkerboard input. If the game (Avatar) or Panosonic bluray player puts out checkerboard then you do not need the adaptor and your 3D ready TV becomes a 3D TV. Practically you need the adaptor also to watch TV broadcasts.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by tripod39 /forum/post/20819894


between a tv being a 3D tv or 3D ready? Thanx.

Sony sells (or used to) 3D Ready TVs. They do not have the Infrared Transmitter (the com device that syncs the L & R 3D images on the TV with the glasses) built into them, nor do they come with any glasses. To make them a "3DTV" you have to buy the IR Transmitter and glasses


The 2007 to 2009 Mits and Samsung DLP RPTVs were 3D Ready. They required a "box" (a 3D format converter) that would attach to the HDMI input on the TV and a 3D source (like a 3D Blu-ray player) would attach to the input of the "box."
 
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