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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I came across this pic while browsing. Not sure if this is accurate or not but any help would be useful. I thought (in hind sight) that mpeg2 was the dominant codec.

 

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MPEG-2 along with BD25 was used on the vast majority of Blu-ray titles in the beginning of Blu-ray's life, which is why early BD's were constantly being criticized for low quality discs.


Neither format uses MPEG-2 much at all anymore, it's mostly all VC-1 or AVC.
 

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As of a couple of months ago, the overall precentage for VC-1 was 50% for both formats combined (much higher for HD DVD-only as stated in the ppt). AVC had something like 26% and MPEG-2 24%. I am sure the numbers have changed some since then but I no longer get the reports....
 

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I don't care either or. Give me VC-1 or AVC. However, I find that AVC tends to look sharper, probably due to the higher bitrate used on Blu-ray exclusive movies.
 

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It will be interesting to see what happens to the market share of VC1 if Paramount resumes and Universal starts releasing in Blu-ray.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeLV /forum/post/12934546


It will be interesting to see what happens to the market share of VC1 if Paramount resumes and Universal starts releasing in Blu-ray.

Use of VC-1 in no way has any relationship with HD DVD. We worked hard to enable its use in BD even before that format was launched. Given this, why do you think the usage pattern changes should the disc format do that?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendell R. Breland /forum/post/12934011


Click here for stats on Blu-ray. Click the column headers to sort. Click home for a lot more info.

VC-1 is indeed hands down the most popular for HD DVD, and very few HD DVDs have MPEG2. Paramount and Weinstein seem(ed) to prefer to use AVC.


For Blu-ray, AVC is the most common and is used on new releases by all the majors except Warner/New Line, followed by MPEG2 (mostly legacy releases) and lastly VC-1.


It is nice to see that advanced codec and BD50 titles are now the majority for Blu-ray. You can see the quoted link for actual percentages...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by amirm /forum/post/12934569


Given this, why do you think the usage pattern changes should the disc format do that?

The only reason I could see this change is the perceived need to compete with the other studios if AVC is seen as the preferred codec in a 'latest and greatest' / marketing sense.


That said, the high bitrate VC-1 encodes that we have seen on Blu-ray so far indicate that there is no technical/quality reason to move from VC-1 to AVC.
 

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I expect that studios will choose codecs as an independent decision from the disc format. Personally, I prefer the look of VC1. The "sharper" look that people attribute to AVC seems unnaturally so to me. We don't get to make the choice on this though.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by amirm /forum/post/12934569


Use of VC-1 in no way has any relationship with HD DVD. We worked hard to enable its use in BD even before that format was launched. Given this, why do you think the usage pattern changes should the disc format do that?

Because of historical fact.


Paramount released all of their Blu-ray releases in MPEG2 or AVC. Their HD DVD releases have been about 60:40 VC-1 to AVC although they seem to be favoring AVC in their more recent releases.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2Channel /forum/post/12934666


I expect that studios will choose codecs as an independent decision from the disc format. Personally, I prefer the look of VC1. The "sharper" look that people attribute to AVC seems unnaturally so to me. We don't get to make the choice on this though.

MPEG2 can look fantastic at high enough bitrates (Kingdom of Heaven is a reference example) and there is some suggestion that it currently produces the most pleasing results for retaining the film grain structure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeLV /forum/post/12934821


MPEG2 can look fantastic at high enough bitrates (Kingdom of Heaven is a reference example) and there is some suggestion that it currently produces the most pleasing results for retaining the film grain structure.

I watched it to and I have to disagree with you. There are other titles that are far better. Ratatouille, Casino Royale, and a few others come to mind.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ECH /forum/post/12935003


I watched it to and I have to disagree with you. There are other titles that are far better. Ratatouille, Casino Royale, and a few others come to mind.

Kingdom of Heaven is Mpeg2. Ratatouille and Casino Royale are AVC/Mpeg4.
 

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I suspect we'll see Warner begin to use AVC after May or so. Slowly at first, and then more and more frequently, though not completely.


I'll make film-style movies like Kingdom of Heaven all day long (and twice on Sunday). MPEG2 done right (plenty of bitrate and nary a special feature in sight - save that for the specials disc!). Crank definitely looks great, too, though has a much more "video" look to it.


I prefer these to Casino Royale, Pirates 1,2,3, etc. I'd put Fifth Element (remastered) somewhere in between them, though.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by UxiSXRD /forum/post/12935092


I suspect we'll see Warner begin to use AVC after May or so. Slowly at first, and then more and more frequently, though not completely.

Any reason why?
 

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Mostly for reasons similar to how audio codecs are chosen. I imagine they'll be offering (and accepting) some assistance to that end, if not a subsidy/offers from those who want to... peddle their wares, as it were.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by UxiSXRD /forum/post/12935136


Mostly for reasons similar to how audio codecs are chosen. I imagine they'll be offering (and accepting) some assistance to that end, if not a subsidy/offers from those who want to... peddle their wares, as it were.

So they'll receive financial incentives to switch to AVC?
 

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Maybe, but I doubt you're thinking such incentive would come from the places I'm suspecting.
 

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I definitely prefer AVC over VC1 - but I'm not sure whether its due to the higher bitrate encodes on BD or if it is in fact superior to VC1 - I'd like to see an equivalent bitrate comparison to be sure - but those are hard to find, as most HD-DVDs use VC1, and most of them are bit starved. Disney and Fox AVC encodes are the standard to measure up to on High Def Media, imo. Sony/MGM AVC is a close 2nd. Then The Matador AVC HD-DVD - whichever studio that is from
. Then Disney VC1(Deja Vu), then Paramount VC1, then Universal VC1, and then Warner VC1 - the worst of them all.
 
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