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I've heard the little "minor cosmetic flaws" type descriptions, but does anyone have any good real world examples of a B Stock item they have bought? The DILA sale jsut kinda got me wondering what was up with that whole B stock thing. Thanks.
 

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Any time they cant sell something as new because it was returned, refurbished etc. Often JVC projectors with their complex bulb ignition sequence has a small problem. customer returns. JCV refurbs, tests and sells as b stock.
 

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B-stock typically means the item has been factory refurbished.


The down side IMHO, the factory has it's work cut out building it right the first time. I am skeptical that a unit that goes back is always capable of being corrected. Little cosmetic things or setup adjustments maybe. Perhaps a unit is only refurbished if the required corrects fall below a certain cost, otherwise the unit is scrapped. My fear would be the refurbished unit ends up only being corrected to serve a short term time frame, but will fail again and sooner than a unit properly built in the first place.


RJ "Mr. Cynical"
 

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Stu:


Here are some examples:

1. Units used as demos at shows such as CEDIA or CES are often sold as B-stock. For instance, every year right after CES there are tons of B-stock items that become available.

2. Units with blemishes (sometimes just scratches) due to mishandling during the manufacturing process or during shipping and sent back to the manufacturer.

3. Units that were D.O.A., often due to shipping damage. Sent back to the manufacturer. They repair them and sell them as B stock. Or units that were taken back by the manufacturer because they didn't work right in one way or another. The manufacturer fixes them and resells them as B-stock.


There is always a risk that some items under category 3 may have some type of endemic problem (it's a lemon) that the manufacturer fixed (or thinks they fixed) that will crop up again. Otherwise, B-stock items often represent a darn good deal, ESPECIALLY when it's because of "blemishes" or "demo". However, the truth of the matter is that dealers rarely knows that "this unit was B-stock because of blemishes and this unit was B-stock because of repairs". The manufacturer is under no obligation to say.
 

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QQQ,


You forgot another reason for B-stock:


Creating a second distribution channel. The manufacturer lets the second tier resellers (such as internet resellers) sell the same stuff as the high-end resellers (i.e. B&M) cheap because it is scratch and dent. In theory they get to increase sells to more frugal customers without pissing off the High-end resellers.


B-stock is usually a good idea in my opinion.


-Mr. Wigggles
 

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LOL, if your suggesting/asking if I'm melonheadI/melonheadII/badgermanII, I'm NOT. I have however been MrQQQigggles on a few occasions :D.
 

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don't forget melonheadIII and his battery powerd sound system made from junkyard parts. It's getting ridiculous


Please dear lord bring CES as fast as possible so we can talk about projectors again.
 
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