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I don't really know much about them. I posted some pics so you guys can see what they are.







Those are currently in a 7.1 Yamaha RX-V2500 receiver but I have 2 more that are currently unused so I was thinking of doing a 2CH PC>receiver>speakers setup.


I'm thinking of this Sony 2CH receiver? Don't really know much about high end audio I pick 6X of the M&K's from my father.

http://www.amazon.com/Sony-STR-DH100...9612367&sr=8-1
 

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They were the most audiophile and yet misunderstood speakers that M&K made.


The transmission line tweeter and the version used in the S1C were the best of the best. ANY tweeter with a plain metal back (and that means everyone else's tweeter on the planet) has internal reflections. The sound comes out the front of the dome (of course) and also goes backwards, where it hits the back plate, and bounces out the front again. Because of the path lengths involved and the short wavelengths involved, the net result is that higher frequencies, perhaps in the range of 7k on up, partially cancel and when they bounce back out the front they are delayed by the timing error; all of this smears the highs a bit. The genius of Ken Kreisel's design was to absorb that back wave. There is a tube on the back - in the case of the S1C that tube comes out the back of the cabinet - and that tube is filled with fiberfill. Therefore it becomes a transmission line and becomes the correct acoustic impedance at the frequencies of interest, therefore soaking them up (in the form of heat) and only allowing the desired FRONT wave to come out.


You therefore have much cleaner highs - the reason the TL Tweeter was used in all the PRO M&K products, which in a studio, may typically sit on top of the console practically in your face, and yet the tweeters do not "spit" at you; rather you hear WHAT IS THERE.


The low freq section is equally interesting. The reason the drivers are physically inverted is that EVERY dynamic speaker is unlinear by its very nature. As the coil is moving INTO the gap, it's cutting across more magnetic lines of force. As the coil is moving OUT of the gap, it's cutting across less lines of magnetic force. This means that essentially when you put in a sine wave you get out something ever so slightly different: the top part (which represents the cone moving out towards you) comes out a little different than the bottom part, represented by the cone moving IN towards the cabinet.


By mounting the speakers backwards mechanically, and then inverting the wiring to one of them, now BOTH cones move out toward you at the same time but the distortion product is essentially cancelled, since they are operating opposite AND the waves from both drivers are summing.


I should point out that these sort of subtle distortions happen at various places in the very long chain of events from the original microphone all the way through the recording / storage / mix / mastering / duplication process, and therefore at ANY place where you can minimize the distortion products, you have a winning situation.


Although the speaker sold well, it was sold during the period when subs, notably M&K subs were coming into more common use. The S1C's are not INTENDED to go down low; the intent is to use them with [a properly coupled] sub which includes a crossover circuit of some kind, whether it is in the form of a home theater receiver with bass management or something else.


As sales people in stores became less technical and less able to explain the subtleties of such a product (besides its taking what might be an inordinate amount of time, not unlike this explanation) the speaker was pushesd aside for more wideband and so-called "full range" speakers, because if you were to A-B the S1C's along with a full range floorstander, and did NOT properly have a sub set up, then most people would not really understand the demo and simply choose the speaker that sounded louder or fuller.


Since you are lucky enough to have 5 of them, then my suggestion is to get at the very least a reasonable HT receiver, and of course a sub, and set them up in the professional ITU configuration and you should be astonished at the results.

It might interest you to read my surround setup page here:
http://www.soundoctor.com/surround.htm


My initial suggestions are the Denon, Marantz or better models, with the sky the limit. I also suggest not falling into the trap of absurd bells and whistles; rather stick to the 5.1 basics and learn the speakers and their capability before playing with sales-and-marketing party modes and resynthesis schemes.


However if budget is your only consideration then there are quite reasonably priced models available.


Remember that EACH part of this discussion opens new cans of worms to add to the equation, but you are off to QUITE a flying start.


Cross 'em over at 80 and enjoy yourself...

Barry
 

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Onkyo TX-NR5009, AppleTV 4K, Sony KDL-55W900A, M&K s-125 lcr, M&K SS-150 surround, SVS 16-46pci sub
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Those are some sweet speakers. I would definitely echo the Marantz. I have a 5.1 setup with M&K S-125 L/C/R, M&K SS-150 SR/SL and an SVS 16-46pci and I am running it off of a Marantz SR 7001 and couldn't be happier. I have also used Onkyo, Pioneer and HK and the Marantz is the best by a long stretch.
 

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Barry


I have obtained a pair of 1-c's sound great but the foam pieces have deteriorated and needs replacement. Any ideas on the type of foam and actual sizes to replace with?


Any photos or diagrams showing the foam attached to the grills.


Gary
 
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