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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A debate I am having with the General Manager and Chief Engineer of one of the local stations is whether consumer TV's are capable of "full 1080i". They argue that an HD monitor capable of "full 1080I" costs at LEAST $5000. The example given was a 14" Sony Model BVMD14H1U - wholsesale price $5,100.00.


How many lines is an under $4000 RPTV or direct view TV capable of resolving? Don't tell me 1080 because that's just not credible. I'm guessing in the range of 700, but that's just a wild guess. I don't have any 1080i test signals, so I can't tell you. HDTV looks REALLY good, but what am I really seeing? Those of you with HTPC's, can you shed some light on this?


David Hays
 

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My Pioneer Elite 510HD (53") seems to resolve about 1100x600 (7" CRTs), before the scan lines start to cross. I haven't done any mechanical or electrical focusing on the set, but I don't suspect it will get a whole lot better. Most of the video amps don't have much more bandwidth than that.


Is he providing some lame excuse for why they aren't doing 1080i? His argument would still be specious, since he'd have to provide 1280x720p in order to max out my set. I can still see the gaps in 480p.


Todd
 

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Almost nothing today can resolve 1080i that the consumer is likely to see.


For example, the "Digital Cinema" projectors that are being used to show Star Wars II in theatres right now are SXGA, being used with anamorphic lenses. They resolve a bit more than half of the 1080I signal.


This is, however, no excuse for not broadcasting HDTV. An HDTV signal looks a lot better than an NTSC signal even if you are downresing it and playing it in a SD monitor.


The answer is: yes, we still have a way to go with monitors; and yes, HDTV is a huge improvement even with today's monitors.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Todd, how have you determined the 1100x600? More generally, how does one determine the resolution of an HD monitor?


David
 

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David,

You have to also distinguish between how many scan lines a CRT-based display can draw and what vertical resolution is present. The scan lines, with a blank no-signal raster, are constant. The vertical resolution varies with the source signal and other factors. Horizontal resolution is also a key parameter for detail. And fewer horizontal scan lines, one limitation of most direct-view CRTs, means a reduction in overall pixel visibility.


In "HDTV programs can't provide 1920 X 1080 because..." I outlined this in more detail. But the chart of measured HDTV resolutions involved some of the best available display gear in the mid-1990s, not current consumer sets. Other consumer-set measurements may exist here, but I only recall LB's 12/05/00 post , which is dated now and provides horizontal resolution but not total scan lines or vertical resolution. -- John
 

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Quote:
Todd, how have you determined the 1100x600? More generally, how does one determine the resolution of an HD monitor?
I made up some simple test patterns in Microsoft Paint. I had my PC connected to my TV for a short time (VGA input). I was going the HTPC route, but for the Elite, it didn't seem worth the downsides (ergonomics, noise, etc.).
 
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