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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just a quick and easy one here....what size/shape/gauge staples did you use to put up your GOM fabric? Just need an idea of what works...


Thanks!!

Darren
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Excuse me? Yes...you use staples to fasten the GOM to the firring strips. How else would you do it?
 

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Excuse me. You said just a quick and easy one and now just like that woman who said the same thing and then kept me up all night in more ways than one . . . .


You do not use firring strips either. The correct way to do it is to use plastic tracking along the wall perimeter and where the fabric is seamed. The fabric is tucked into a very narrow slot in the track. This takes some time and skill. Where the track changes direction, joints must be mitered etc.


You can use whatever you want. Railroad ties and spikes :), firring strips and staples, it is your room.
 

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the railroad ties would add a nice earthy smell to the room :D
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by mark haflich


You do not use firring strips either. The correct way to do it is to use plastic tracking along the wall perimeter and where the fabric is seamed. The fabric is tucked into a very narrow slot in the track. This takes some time and skill. Where the track changes direction, joints must be mitered etc.
Mark, are you referring to the Wallmate system?
 

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I am not familiar with that system. The tracks I use are 1 1/4 inch deep and thus are the same thickness as the sheet rock backed compressed 1 1/4 inch thick corning sheets I use for surface hard and soft absorption. These sheets together with 1 1/4 inch deep diffusers are part of the the Acoustic Room Systems treatment for a room.
 

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Not sure what all this "track" stuff is...


I used 5/16 inch staples - Arrow J20 or somehting like that. They are the flat u-shaped kind. I've read here that some people use 1/2 inch staples. My fabric has been up a couple months now with no problems or any popping out.


Andy
 

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There's more than one way to attach fabric. Plastic track systems, such as Wallmate and the system originally used by Owens-Corning, are available and are designed to be used largely by consumers. They are more expensive than staple based methods but tend to be more forgiving. "Forgiving" meaning, if the fabric puckers or the weave is not straight, it can be removed and you can try again. Professional fabric installers tend to use staple/tacking strip methods which work better where you have holes (like sconces, projector lens openings, etc.), concave, convex or other odd shapes. Many of the plastic track systems have had issues with the fabric coming loose over time. The advantage to a track based system is the ability to change/replace the fabric at a later date.
 

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That track system is not exactly quicker than staples. It also has a tendency to pull out - both the door and the wall near the door have loosened due to people putting their hands on it.


ARS certainly is time and money and skill spent - 120hr of labor, $25 sq.ft, plus up charges for corners, edges, doors, diffusers. Nearly $30K for a small room. I drew the line when they quoted me another $5K for the doors, I did them myself and took me a solid weekend.


Staples seems like less time/money and you should not have to worry about it pulling out - as long as you use the right staples. Artists have been stapling canvas for years with no problems, likewise upholsterers stapling fabric on chairs. ARS does have one advantage of not requiring molding to hide the stapled furring tracks - but some people here have figured out how to do the smoothly abutted edges/corners without having the plastic tracks.


Some people here have stapled the panels then put them on the wall - use firring strips as a standoff and you have just doubled their bass absorption characteristics.


The ARS panels are nothing more than thin sheetrock backed on the ductboard (compressed rigid fiberglass) that everyone is using here. Some advantage as a panel bass trap with reflective side out, but essentially same absorption on the other side.


How much time and money is the firring/stapling costing people?


Dennis, ARS is only done with professional installation with certified installers. Not even the dealers install it themselves. Not a consumer product at all - I only got to install the doors myself because I was not going to pay and they happened to leave their leftovers.


Do you have a link to WallMate?
 

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My installers have been trained by ARS and we do the labor on the ARS systems we sell. God I am not trying to pitch myself here. We have had no trouble with fabric loosening and we have no trouble with electrical boxes, wall sconces, etc etc, it is simply a question of proper construction before application of the ARS materials.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by mark haflich
The correct way to do it is to use plastic tracking along the wall perimeter and where the fabric is seamed.
it maybe your prefered way, but it is not the only correct way.


track systems are generally not available to end users.


here is another track system.

http://www.fabritrak.com/Install.asp
 

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Quote:
Dennis, ARS is only done with professional installation with certified installers. Not even the dealers install it themselves. Not a consumer product at all - I only got to install the doors myself because I was not going to pay and they happened to leave their leftovers.
Krag:

ARS when original introduced was not as restrictive with respect to who could sell and install the product. I would agree it is not for the first timer. The Wallmate system seems to work well for "first timers" but, none-the-less, practice would be a word to the wise. None-the-less, the primary advantage of the plastic track mount systems is the ability re-hang the fabric in the event of an error.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Wow...didn't know about the track systems. Everyone here always seems to talk about stapling and firring strips. WallMate and the like seem very interesting but I'll probably stick with my plan.


Just goes to show...not much is "quick and easy" around here....I should have known better. :)


Darren

(Company affiliation coming soon...)
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by dkammer
Wow...didn't know about the track systems. Everyone here always seems to talk about stapling and firring strips.
well @ 5.50$ a linear feet + labor you will be ripping wood too. :)


BTW, I use 18ga. x 5/8" long 1/4" crown finish staples on a porter pnematic stapler. :)
 

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Just to add to the poll I used a Sears pneumatic stapler with 1/2" crown. I think I used several lengths, whatever Sears had in stock at the time. I used close to 14000 staples. I imagine I would have used almost twice that many if I had used 1/4" crown....something to think about.
 

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1/2in x 1/4in wide staples. I bought a Sears oil-less gun for about $70. The Porter Cable staples Home Depot has work fine in the Sears stapler. Problem with "official" Craftsman staples is you can only but a few thousand at a time cleaning out your local Sears. Don't worry, they work just fine to spite all the warnings.


Some may say 1/2 is too long but it all depends on yoyur furring strips. I used 5/4 x 4in strips ripped in half. 5/4 is exactly 1in thick. This stuff is soft pine so longer is a little better.


FWEIW, I used 25,000 staples in My 18x38x10 Ht. Trust me, BUY AN AIR COMPRESSOR FOR $300. You will find plenty of other uses for it after the HT is done.
 
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