AVS Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
702 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey All


Sorry if this seems like a dumb question, but what source do you use to focus you Sharp 10k projector. I have just been using the green Keystone grid. Is that the correct thing to use? I dial it in run to the screen then run back and make adjustments. One nice guy did tell me to use 8x binoculars. This way you avoid all the running back n fourth. I dial the focus in until I see two side by side pixels and just a soft edge on the right side of them. I have not been able to dial it in were they both are perfectly smooth, have you?


I am just wondering if I'm doing something wrong or could I be doing something better.


Thanks in advance.


Jerry:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
988 Posts
I use an HTPC and have a one pixel wide grid on my PC desktop. As long as I can see the sharp outline of each pixel up close, I know it's in focus. I've heard about the binocular trick for converging RPTV's. Seems it should make it easier with the PJ, too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Hi:


What I do is this, and it's very simple.


Get yourself a pair of Tasco 7X35WA Zip Focus binoculars. $20 at Walmart. Focus from the projector for both eyes. If you wear glasses, take them off and focus through the binoculars onto the screen. Turn on the projector and let it warm up for approximately 30 minutes. Then pull down the center menu. It will fall approximately in the middle of the screen. When you get up close to the screen you will see little boxes. The idea is to get these little boxes as clear as possible. While looking through the binoculars, turn the focus ring until those little boxes are crystal clear and that's it! It's very simple to do and once you know how to do it, it should take no more than 2 or 3 minutes to do a touch-up.


Best regards,


jshd
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
I agree with jshd... the built-in menus work nicely for focusing the Sharp. The blue-gray background makes seeing the edges of individual mirrors easy. The binocs keep you from having to run back and forth between screen and projector if you don't have a second person to help you.


By using the Sharp's own menu screens, of course, you don't have to worry about the sharpness of any input's source material.


There's another handy menu screen that the Sharp can project with which you can make sure your projector is "square" to the screen. This will make the focus uniform from center to edges and top to bottom of the screen.


Invoke the keystone adjustment menu and get the green "grid" up on the screen. Don't do any actual adjustments; just look at the width and clarity of the grid lines at the edges of the screen vs. the center and at the top vs. the bottom. Cancel out of the menu when you're done. You may never be able to get perfect focus throughout the screen, since this depends on the quality and precise allignment of the Sharp's lens and prism assembly. But you can at least 'average' the focus across the screen to minimize the amount of 'out-of-focus' any single part of the screen suffers.


-H.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
This is just my personal preference, but I believe the image looks a little better if you actually de-focus the image slightly. A SLIGHT de-focus actually removes the "screendoor" for me, without sacrificing picture quality.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top