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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought a new house and found out I cannot get DSS due to tree blockages (shoot!!!).


I was going to get a DirecTV/OTA receiver, but since i can't get DTV, maybe i should get a different STB? any suggestions?


thanks in advance,
 

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I would get another opinion on your tree/Direct TV situation. In installing several thousand (no typo) regular Direct, and several hundred HD systems I think there were only 2 or 3 that could not be done. They were tiny little houses with huge trees covering the whole house. You could always cement a little pole into the ground out in the yard away from the tree thing, and use direct burial cable back to the house.
 

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I'm not going to touch the neighbor issue...you live there not me. However, the zoning issues don't apply. You're allowed to put up the antenna by FCC regulation, and that regulation trumps all housing association, local, and state regulations. Safety is the only permissible issue.


Mike
 

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Bsaitz,

A chainsaw is always my first thought. Are you very sure that you can not get Dss? You can run RG6 a very, very long way to find a location where you can get a peek at the satelite. Get somone experinced to look at your situation before you give up. Art


[This message has been edited by Art Lloyd (edited 05-01-2001).]
 

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If trees block the the satellite, what makes you think OTA will work better?


Glenn
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
i think i have a shot with OTA since there is an OTA antenna on the house already and the DSS is SSW, but the OTA (manahttan) is more due south - which is less blocked.. don't depress my any further.. ;-)
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Glenn_L:
If trees block the the satellite, what makes you think OTA will work better?


Glenn
OTA UHF is much less affected by foliage. Many people can even receive OTA signals with an attic mounted antenna, which does not work with Sat TV. I can easily receive OTA HD through heavy tree cover, yet had to place my dish in the very back of my yard.

The Satellites are also in very specific locations in the sky, and the dish has a very narrow reception angle, so it need to be pointed directly at the dish. Many OTA antennas are omni-directional.

It is also possible that the OTA towers are in a different direction from the satellite, and thus he may have an unobstructed view.

The bottom line is that just because you can't get satellite, doesn't mean you can't get OTA.



SM



[This message has been edited by Swampfox (edited 05-01-2001).]
 

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Mike,


FCC says you can put a dish on your house, regardless of code. I doubt that their rules cover a 40+ foot tower for a dish. I'm sure that zoning rules trump in that case.
 

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I also have the Samsung SIR-T150, and would recommend it if you have no interest in satellite service. The unit is very small (about 3" high), and has no fan noise, which seems to be a common complaint on this board.

Someone here will probably recommend getting the DTC-100 anyway since it's about $100 less, but I tried that unit and didn't like it since it was so big & clunky (didn't fit in the entertainment center), and had the fan running all the time.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by ClaudeD:
Mike,


FCC says you can put a dish on your house, regardless of code. I doubt that their rules cover a 40+ foot tower for a dish. I'm sure that zoning rules trump in that case.
Claude,


Since I wasn't sure about my answer I went looking... and the answer on this issue from the FCC site is given below. Short form is, your mast can be as tall as you want as long as it meets safety requirements. You can find the FCC site by searching HD Hardware for FCC. One of the hits will give you an URL.


Mike


A: If you have an exclusive use area that is covered by the rule and need to put your antenna on a mast, the local government, community association or landlord may require you to apply for a permit for safety reasons if the mast extends more than 12 feet above the roofline. If you meet the safety requirements, the permit should be granted. Note that the Commission's rule only applies to antennas and masts installed wholly within the antenna user's exclusive use area. Masts that extend beyond the exclusive use area are outside the scope of the rule. For installations on single family homes, the "exclusive use area" generally would be anywhere on the home or lot and the mast height provision is usually most relevant in these situations. For example, if a homeowner needs to install an antenna on a mast that is more than 12 feet taller than the roof of the home, the homeowners' association or local zoning authority may require a permit to ensure the safety of such an installation, but may not prohibit the installation unless there is no way to install it safely. On the other hand, if the owner of a condominium in a building with multiple dwelling units needs to put the antenna on a mast that extends beyond the balcony boundaries, such installation would generally be outside the scope and protection of the rule, and the condominium association may impose any restrictions it wishes (including an outright prohibition) because the Commission rule does not apply in this situation.


 
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