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Discussion Starter #1
Besides the obvious installation of lights and switches, what else do I need to have my electrician informed on?


Now I have decided to do much of the work myself and hire an electrician for the electrical stuff. I still may hire a CEDI certified installer as well.


* I would want the electrician to install some sconces and recessed lighting and have the lights dimmable via the remote control. He would need to know what I would need to make the lights dim. Its a Lutron product right? Which one? Is the device mounted in the light switch housing box?


* Run power to the location of the projector complete with surge protection. There is currently a ceiling light in the middle of the room. I would have him remove that light and then use that source to run power to the projector. The projector would be mounted towards the rear of the room so he should be able to run power to it from the light source or create a new source. How close to the projector should he put the outlet? Is there a special surge protection outlet I should use or just one he recommends??


* Possibly add another outlet high on the wall near the ceiling for rope light if I want to add that later on. Crown molding would hide the outlet.


Is there anything else that I need to address? Should I have a wall switch that turns on/off the projector or just use the remote?


I remember someone posting something about having the electrician create 1 circuit for lights and a 2nd circuit for equipment and make them 20 amps or something like that. When I mentioned this to the electrician, he said he would have to rip out all my drywall in order to run new wires. to make that happen. Talking to some other electrical companies they say that is not true. They can do what they need to do without ripping all the drywall out. (My basement is a finished room). Perhaps I didn't explain that procedure correctly. If anyone knows what I meant please chime in.


Thanks again for your help!!
 

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Ask what brand of switches/recepticals he uses or, better yet, give him a "spec" sheet with exactly what you want. How many recessed lights (and what size), switches, switched outlets, 20A runs, multiway (multi-switch) lights, etc.. Then specify a brand of switches and a "grade". If you don't speciify a grade, you'll get "builder basic" which isn't necessarily bad, it just may not be what you want.


If you don't specify everythiing up front in writing, each electricin will hear you say something slightly different and you won't be getting apples-to-apples quotes. If you don't specifiy a brand/grade, you might get some cheap-o stuff from China.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well that is the reason I posted here because I have no idea about anything electrical. Some of you guys that have done your own electrical work or have hired an electrician may be better to ask so I don't get the wrong thing or have him install something that I don't want. Like the brand of switches and grade - I have no clue as to what to consider and what to stay away from. I agree about writing up a spec sheet. I just need to know what to add in it besides the lights and other things I mentioned in my post.
 

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Ask to see his license, check with the to see if there have been any claims against him. Ask to talk to some of the people he has done work for. Other than that can't think of much.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
A friend of mine referred me to him. I just looked at his work he did at my friends house and he did a good job. The good thing is he said that he will be charging me just for the labor if I go get the supplies I need beforehand. Yes he is licensed.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Don_Kellogg /forum/post/12950788


Ask to see his license, check with the to see if there have been any claims against him. Ask to talk to some of the people he has done work for. Other than that can't think of much.

All good. Also, ask him for stock tips, weather forecast, etc. Get your moneys' worth.
 

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I'll give these a try...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuck1906 /forum/post/12949531


Besides the obvious installation of lights and switches, what else do I need to have my electrician informed on?


Now I have decided to do much of the work myself and hire an electrician for the electrical stuff. I still may hire a CEDI certified installer as well.


* I would want the electrician to install some sconces and recessed lighting and have the lights dimmable via the remote control. He would need to know what I would need to make the lights dim. Its a Lutron product right? Which one? Is the device mounted in the light switch housing box?

I haven't used Lustron, so no comments on this one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuck1906 /forum/post/12949531


* Run power to the location of the projector complete with surge protection. There is currently a ceiling light in the middle of the room. I would have him remove that light and then use that source to run power to the projector. The projector would be mounted towards the rear of the room so he should be able to run power to it from the light source or create a new source. How close to the projector should he put the outlet? Is there a special surge protection outlet I should use or just one he recommends??

Good idea to put a surge suppressor outlet at the projector. As for brands, Cooper and Leviton at two big names. I don't know if Cooper makes such an outlet, but I know Leviton does. I like their products and you can't go too wrong with them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuck1906 /forum/post/12949531


* Possibly add another outlet high on the wall near the ceiling for rope light if I want to add that later on. Crown molding would hide the outlet.

Another good idea. And make it switched as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuck1906 /forum/post/12949531


* Is there anything else that I need to address? Should I have a wall switch that turns on/off the projector or just use the remote?

There seems to be a debate on this. The downside to a switch is that someone might turn it off while the proector is cooling down. If this happens too many times, it will probably shorten the life of the bulb. On the other hand, if you don't switch it, some projectors (most??) might stay in standby mode consuming 8 watts or so. I guess you pick your poison. Mine is unswitched.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuck1906 /forum/post/12949531


* I remember someone posting something about having the electrician create 1 circuit for lights and a 2nd circuit for equipment and make them 20 amps or something like that. When I mentioned this to the electrician, he said he would have to rip out all my drywall in order to run new wires to make that happen. Talking to some other electrical companies they say that is not true. They can do what they need to do without ripping all the drywall out. (My basement is a finished room). Perhaps I didn't explain that procedure correctly. If anyone knows what I meant please chime in.

Again, another good idea. In general, you want all your equipment on one circuit, if possible. This will minimize the likelihood of a ground loop (which causes audible hum in the speakers). Don't forget to put the subwoofer on that circuit also. Sometimes this is too much gear for one circuit -- even a 20A one. A mid-size HT receiver could easily take half of that 20A. Regardless though if you end up with several circuits in the room (say two 20A circuits plus all the other wall outlets on another), have the electrician put all the circuits on the same "leg" in the breaker box and keep the ones in the HT room as close to each other as possible. This will also help minimize ground loops should you need to put equipment on those other outlets.


A few other suggestions:

- If you are doing all this work, ask your electrican how much he charges for a whole house surge suppressor. Decent units are available for about $100 and are easily installed.


- You should probably use at least three switches for room lighting. One for main lights. One for recessed cans over the screen (good for showing off your theater). One for the rope lights. And you might want a fourth for sconces or more recessed lights to wash light down the side walls.


- If you are going to put in a riser, you will probably want a small light to illuminate the step so no one trips. Explain to your electrician what you need so he can run a wire for that prupose and leave itcoiled up until you determine its exact location.


- Finally, you don't have to locate your scones and wash lights during rough-in. Let the electrician know about where you want them and he can leave the wire coiled up in the wall/ceiling. That way when you finalize your theater decore and install the finish touches (like columns and doors), you can cut a hole exactly where the light needs to go, reach up, pull out the wire and make the connection. To do this, you will need to buy what are called "old work" boxes or recessed lights. They are made to be used for exactly this purpose.


- Also, read the thread, "What I'd do differently next time" if you haven't already.


Good Luck!


Regards,

Scott
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Now that is what I was talking about!!!!! Thanks a bunch Scott!!! That's what I needed to hear!!
 

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For lighting control look at the grafik eye sticky at the top of this forum. GE is a little spendy, but it is a nice lighting control system. You can do similar for less with insteon, x-10, or z-wave. You can also do similar, but less custom stuff with the spacer system. If you go with grafik eye, check ebay for prices (at least 4 zones), and print out a few of the better posts inthe sticky and give it to your electrcian.


I did a separate 20 amp circuit at my equipment rack. Some do separate ones to the PJ, and/or multiple ones to the rack. Depends on your needs.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Cool that was the one thing I forgot to mention to Scott about how to control the lights via the remote. So thanks again!!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
So I had a licensed electrician out at the house last week and today he quoted me $2,600 and change to do the upgraded work.


Now the work would include: Adding two 20 amp circuits to the room, 1 for the equipment (including subwoofer) and the other for lights (4 sconces and 4-6 recessed lighting). Whole house surge suppressor; Installing a surge protected outlet on ceiling for the PJ; Wire the lights with a lighting control (Lutron) that I can dim the lights with the remote; Remove current ceiling light.


He said the recessed lighting cans and trim would be provided by him unless I wanted to choose them on my own.


For everything listed above is $2,600.00 right on point or too high? This is the first quote I have received and plan to shop around before I make a decision. Now I will say that my room is an already finished and drywalled room. So we already discussed the need to punch smalls holes in the ceiling to do the wiring for the lights. I agreed to do all the patchwork myself.
 

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Quote:
For everything listed above is $2,600.00 right on point or too high? This is the first quote I have received and plan to shop around before I make a decision. Now I will say that my room is an already finished and drywalled room. So we already discussed the need to punch smalls holes in the ceiling to do the wiring for the lights. I agreed to do all the patchwork myself.

I dont feel so bad, my was $1800


6 cans, 3 20 amp circuits, wiring for rope lighting (hmmmm...dont know where the switch is for that
), standard outlets every 3 to 4 feet in the room, also wiring roughed in for the mini-split system.


my room was not drywalled so it was easy for him.


He did not wire the sconces in ( I have a call in now).


They charge a good $$ per hour and if you think about it, its probably 8 - 12 hours work for all the wiring especially since you have drywall up.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
hmmm okay well I think I am going to get a few more quotes and then make a decision.
 

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I am using the deep boxes for my switches and receptacles so there is more room to accomadate home automation dimmers and receptackes. I'm thinking of going UPB HA the devices are a bit deeper. Worth thinking about.


Eric
 

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