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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello - I'm building a new house outside the Cable service area, so I will be moving to DBS. I'm having the house pre-wired and I will have 4 rooms on satellite, one of which will have HDTV.


My question is - what is the best coax to pull for the run from the dish to the receiver?


I think the cable guys use RG-59, but I'm not sure. Any help would be appreciated.


LGBall
 

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ALL coax used for DBS should be RG6, ideally rated for 2.2 GHz or higher.


The more important question - how do you intend to wire ?


Again, ideally, you will have AT LEAST 4 cables coming from the dish installation spot, down to a central wiring closet, where you should have no less than 2 RG6 cables going to each spot in any room (I would strongly suggest 3 or 4 RG 6 cables to each outlet area, along with 2 runs of CAT 5 UTP cable). Using the central wiring closet as a hub, you then have the most flexibility to wire things however you need.


Once the central closet has all connections, you can hook up whatever you want to where ever you want (have the telephone service pulled to this room as well).
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I do intend to pull Cat6 to all spots along with telephone - but why multiple coax feeds? I guess for separate feeds to VCR, Tivo, etc. I think two would be enough for 2 of my locations and 1 to the other two.


On another note, I had assumed that I would home run the coax from the dish to the outlet. I see you proposing some sort of a patch panel like scheme. Is there a problem with signal loss in the "splices"?


LGBall
 

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It's MUCH easier to pull it now, while the walls are not sheetrocked, than later.


Reason for 3 or 4 runs - The Dual Tuner PVR. That by itself will take up 2 runs of coax. That doesn't leave any extras available for antenna / cable (when it comes close enough/ cheap enough), or feeding a house distribution system.


You can do whatever you want, but if it was MY house - 4 runs RG6 to every TV outlet (along with the CAT 5/6 UTP runs..


As far as signal loss through the barrel connectors - for DBS, it is insignificant, I don't think it does too much on analog either.
 

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What provider are you going with, Dish or DirecTV? If Dish, and you opt for DishPro LNBs/switches RG6 is required.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Paradox-SJ
For best results use Quad-Shield RG6.
That blanket statement is both misleading and incorrect. Quad-shielded RG-6 has no better signal transmission properties than standard RG-6 because both use the same diameter core wire. (It's the core wire gauge that determines the signal transmissivity, not the shielding.) While quad-shielded RG-6 cable provides better shielding, that issue only becomes necessary when there's a severe local RF field in the immediate vicinity (several feet or less) such as a high current generator, motor, or unshielded power cabling involved with either. To provide superior signal transmission for a particularly long run, it would be necessary to graduate up to RG-11 cabling (which is quad-shielded to boot), though it is more difficult to work with because of its larger diameter core wire and the quad-shielding.
 

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Proper cabling is necessary, but overcabling is not unless you are the type who absolutely has to have the best, regardless of cost. People can get a bit overindulgent when it comes to cabling.


It is a good idea to wire your new home for today as well as the "reasonable" future. First, lets cover ethernet.....run at least 2 CAT5E or CAT6 to each jack where you will/might potentially have any AV equipment, a PC, or other type of media device. In case you're wondering one Cat5 will be used for telephones (up to four lines) or for a digital phone system plus DSL, fax. The second Cat5 will be used for networking. Current networking is 10/100baseT. This uses 2 pairs. Future networking will be 1000BaseT (gigabit networking) and this will use all four pairs in a Cat5E or Cat6 cable. While Gigabit will likely not be necessary anytime soon for residential computer networking, gigabit might bave future use in your home for transmission of AV signals from room to room, particularly HD signals. Run an additional Cat5e or Cat6 if you think you might have the need for additional phone lines, or in areas where you might have multiple computers or network devices (one Cat5 can provide networking for many devices when using an ethernet switch which is a low cost device). Individual runs are better especially in thsoe areas where you might have heavy ethernet use. Home run all cables to one point (like a climate controlled storage closet) and use a distribuion panel. I recommend OnQ's products. Leviton sells entry level stuff in Home Depot. OnQ is better.


Just make sure your contractor provides low voltage plastic conduit from the distribution panel to the exterior of your home where the utilities will bring their wire from the outside to your distribution panel. Keep in mind that most utilities will not share conduit. So if you plan to have telephone, cable TV, etc. provide one 3/4" or 1" conduit for each service. BTW, don't listen to electricians or your contractor. Call the utilities for confirmation!!!


Next is Coax........How long are your runs going to be? How many Square feet is your home?


I would recommend one RG6QS to each drop for cable TV. Regardless of whether you plan to install cable TV. Home run each line back to the distribution panel.


I would also recommend a minimum of one RG6QS for each drop for satellite. Run two or three RG6QS for satellite in locations where you'll likely have most of your AV equipment and might want to use multiple receivers or DirecTivo, etc.... It is not necessary that you overcable and run multiple satellite drops to areas where you'd likely never have multiple tuners, i.e. bathrooms, kitchen, secondary bedrooms, etc....While its nice to prepare for any eventuality, cabling adds up. Especially if you have your cable run by a contractor. The cost is more than just the cable, they'll likely charge you additional labor as well.


Now, as far as which coax cable to use......


1) If your runs are under 100 feet each, then you can get by just fine with RG6QS, even the standard CCS version (Copper Covered Steel).


2) If your runs are over 100 feet, then I would highly recommend you use at a minimum RG6QS with a CC (Copper Core). The big advantage of the copper core is that there will be less voltage drop between the receiver and the LNB's. Remember the receiver powers the LNB's, unless you use a powered multiswitch such as those made by Spaun (my favorite multiswitch manufacturer). Even if you use a powered multiswitch, use RG6QS CC on runs over 100 feet.


3) RG11 is nice when runs extend over 300-400 feet. The 14 gauge center core in RG11 will have less attenuation when running long long runs. RG11 is not necessary by any stretch of the imagination if your runs are shorter than 200 feet. If you do use RG11, consider getting it with a Copper Core. Most RG11 is CCS.


Next, if you plan to distribute video between rooms, you might want to run some RG59 for baseband video from room to room. You'll also need to run cable for L/R audio channels or speaker cable if your outputs are not line level. Also in the event you prewire for security cameras make sure you use either RG59 CC (copper core) or RG6 (copper Core). Do not use CCS cable for security cameras. Most CCS coax is incapable of sustaining a 1V peak to peak video signal for closed circuit video.


Fiber? Thats debatable. Some would insist upon it. I'm not hot on it unless you have money burning a hole in your pocket. Fiber requires you hire a competent contractor to run, terminating is expensive and it still remains to be seen if it will be used in homes anytime soon. Ten years ago people felt it would be ten years before fiber would play a part in homes. Now we're ten years later and its still meaningless for the most part. There are very very few areas in the US where you could get fiber to the curb. Even in those areas the service providers are converting from fiber to twisted pair at the service entry. As ethernet technologies continue to improve, fiber becommes less likely to be useful inside a home.


Thats my spiel. Good luck with your prewire effort. Hopefully you don't pass out when you see just how much all this prepwiring will cost you....
 
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