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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello

I found a terrific buy on a power line conditioner I am thinking of buying two protect my soon-to-be purchased plasma TV. However this great by on power protection didn't include coaxial protectors you see on some line conditioners explicitly designed for television. So can somebody tell me just what are the included protectors on line conditioners or surge protectors designed for use with televisions. When I googled shop search for coaxial lightning arrest is I get some very pricey results. Surely to pricey to be included with some of these not too expensive surge protectors two at a time as you often see them. So please tell me, show me, link me, to just what these protectors are.

And thanks
 

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The coax lines can cary voltage, if they get hit outside with lightning or the electrical company has issues, and the idea is for the surge protecton to filter off as much voltage as possible from them, in addition to the AC lines.


Think of a moat (surge protector) surrounding the castle (electronic equipment); you have to protect all access to the castle for it to be safe. In other words, anything connected to the equipment from the outside world needs to be filtered. This includes AC, coax, network cables, phone lines. You do not need to filter connections that are between equipment that is inside the moat, like HDMI.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken H
The coax lines can cary voltage, if they get hit outside with lightning or the electrical company has issues, and the idea is for the surge protecton to filter off as much voltage as possible from them, in addition to the AC lines.


Think of a moat (surge protector) surrounding the castle (electronic equipment); you have to protect all access to the castle for it to be safe. In other words, anything connected to the equipment from the outside world needs to be filtered. This includes AC, coax, network cables, phone lines. You do not need to filter connections that are between equipment that is inside the moat, like HDMI.
Hoops - that post got in the forum I didn't mean this question to get into.


The forum question was supposed to get into "Local HDTV Info and Reception" forum of these forms. The reason I meant it to get in the reception forum is I was thinking of getting a surge protector to also connect my TV antenna through. Would it be OK for me to repost that question in that proper forum for what I am trying to answer? I mean unchanged, but should it be changed to make myself clearer? Is it clear that I want this search protector question to be answered in regard to antenna, for local over the air reception? And does anybody here know if this type of protection included with surge protectors does anything for you if you are connecting a television antenna, not a satellite or cable TV provider to them?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bbmiller
Hoops - that post got in the forum I didn't mean this question to get into.


The forum question was supposed to get into "Local HDTV Info and Reception" forum of these forms.
That is the wrong forum. I moved it to the correct forum, which is where it is now.

The HDTV local forum is for provider specific or reception specific questions, and each local area has existing topics for use. Your question is not a local specific question, so it's correct for it to be here in this forum.

Quote:
The reason I meant it to get in the reception forum is I was thinking of getting a surge protector to also connect my TV antenna through.
That is the same thing I was referring to above; any coax cable should be filtered to protect the equipment. It could be a DBS coax, cable tv coax, a TV antenna coax, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken H
That is the wrong forum. I moved it to the correct forum, which is where it is now.

The HDTV local forum is for provider specific or reception specific questions, and each local area has existing topics for use. Your question is not a local specific question, so it's correct for it to be here in this forum.


That is the same thing I was referring to above; any coax cable should be filtered to protect the equipment. It could be a DBS coax, cable tv coax, a TV antenna coax, etc.
OK - well maybe I need to get really focused on just what my question is. My question is this I found this terrific buy on a power line conditioner to protect my television from powerline surges, increases and decreases in AC voltage, and many other types of powerline disturbances, but this terrific buy for a power line conditioner doesn't include the sometimes included coaxial cable protection. Doing a search on Google shop for coaxial cable lightning arresters turns up some very pricey lightning arresters . So are those very pricey ones necessary and justified in price? And how do I do a Google shop search for once not better than the ones you find included in powerline conditioners meant for television protection? What I am looking to do is price what I think is a terrific price on a power line conditioner not intended for television protection, but might be able to do a very good job at a very good price with a little help of outboard coaxial cable protector that is not to pricey?
 

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It also should be mentioned that you need to be careful with the rating of the surge suppressor to make sure it won't block some of your signal. A lot of surge suppressors with built in coax protection used to not pass anything over 1GHz, which will cause issues with digital cable, cable internet, and satellite TV services.
 

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I don't know, I just know the one time I hooked up my surge suppressor to my digital cable line it killed all HD and digital channels on the box. Maybe it was rated lower than 1GHz. I do know for a fact that DirecTV goes above 1GHz, their splitters etc. for new equipment all are rated to 3GHz.


Either way you need to be aware and check for the rating on the suppressor and make sure it will work with whatever kind of signal you are going to be using. Just thought that would be an important thing to point out in a thread like this so people finding this thread through a search won't assume that any surge suppressor will work. The original poster here is actually only interested in OTA so pretty much any suppressor will work for him, but that isn't true for everyone.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken H  /t/1355710/what-type-of-coaxial-pro...ge-protectors-line-conditioners#post_20857131


The coax lines can cary voltage, if they get hit outside with lightning or the electrical company has issues, and the idea is for the surge protecton to filter off as much voltage as possible from them, in addition to the AC lines.


Think of a moat (surge protector) surrounding the castle (electronic equipment); you have to protect all access to the castle for it to be safe. In other words, anything connected to the equipment from the outside world needs to be filtered. This includes AC, coax, network cables, phone lines. You do not need to filter connections that are between equipment that is inside the moat, like HDMI.
 

 

Couldn't of said it better. 
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by oechikr  /t/1355710/what-type-of-coaxial-pro...ge-protectors-line-conditioners#post_24015080



Couldn't of said it better. 
I guess you should have been here two years ago when the thread was started.
 
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