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I don't actually HAVE an HTPC yet, but my receiver and computer are both set up to input sound to each other.


What's so odd about that?


The receiver would qualify as an antique. It has no remote control, and no buttons except for the power button; its controls are 6 large switches and 7 knobs (one of which controls a radio tuner with the little needle that physically slides left and right in front of a number-printed panel) with little grooves on them like diminished gear teeth. Its only displays are the radio frequency needle, a radio signal strength needle, and one that swings left or right to tell you whether the radio signal should get better above or below where you are right now, or points straight down to tell you it's as good as it'll get.


One set of inputs and outputs is labelled "tape monitor", so I guess they had separate tape recorders in mind, but I don't know why that had to be a separate set of connections, since they don't seem to be functionally different from others. Also, some of the connections back there are little screws in slots with walls on two opposite sides. The speakers it came with had wires with weird little "claw/fork" ends with two prongs and a rounded space between them; this would slide into the little slot and around the screw, and then you'd tighten the screw to clamp it in place. I couldn't find such wires when I had to replace the speakers, so I had to take bare straight speaker wire ends and bend them into a "J" to hook them around the screws.


The front is silver with some kind of "brushed" effect, and the top and sides have fake wood-grained plastic on them. The controls are lebelled with some odd terminology, too. Next to the headphone jack, there's a speaker-selection knob you use to switch between "Off" (which is what you have to do to turn the headphone jack on), A, B, A+B, and "Matrix". A and B are the front and rear speaker sets, I figure (it might even say that on the back where the wires connect), but I don't get the difference between "A+B" and "Matrix", unless it's that the former would have the front and rear doing the same thing and the latter has four unique channels... but it's hard to imagine that they were doing surround-sound back then (in a format that doesn't seem like it could be ancestral to today's, which started with a single rear signal). There's also an on-off switch labelled "Tape Monitor", which must be Off in order to enable the knob that switches between AM, FM, Phono, and Aux, but just plays through another ordinary input when it's On. (?) Next to the volume knob is a "Loudness" On/Off switch; but it does something other than make it louder, because the sound is better with it On and the volume turned down lower than with it Off and the volume turned up higher. It also has a Scratch Filter switch (for those scratchy records), and a Muting switch that doesn't seem to really have any effect (and seems like it would be redundant to Loudness if it did anything). But the funniest one is the Low Filter; back then, they didn't want to have the bass "boosted" like everyone's obsessed with today, they wanted it filtered out! And trust me, the way this thing works, the bass really is excessive with this switch Off.


It's from JC Penny's now-defunct Modular Components System line. I got it for $30 from an old retired neighbor who was moving out of her house and into a care facility of some kind and selling off a bunch of stuff. It's humorous, but it does its job well... especially compared to the thin air I could've afforded otherwise after the financial disasters of the last few years.
 

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Several years ago we had a consultant who set up our internal internet before anyone knew what the Internet was. He was written up in time magazine because he controlled his refirgerator (to keep the beer cold) and the hot tub (where he drank the beer) warm. These he could monitor via the internet (using Mosaic of course) from whereever he happened to be working.


Delvo, I think you have a "quadraphonic " receiver. Perhaps you can purchase some quadraphonic vinyl LPs to play on it. They actually had four separate tracks. Now in order to control this antique you would need some stepper motors and selenoids along with a control card for your PC. Now THAT would be bizzarre.
 

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I got a receiver from my parents that was older than I was by a year.


It isn't working yet (I need to decide on Pronoto or an IR blaster) but I'm going to have control of my window AC unit integrated into my system. Then it will automatically lower the fan speed when I start a movie. This might sound over the top, but I have to do this every time I want to hear something as the speakers are located right near the window.
 

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Delvo,


Have you ever hear the expression A/B testing? It's when you compare one component or speakers to another by flipping a switch. That's what you got. My old NAD receiver had the same thing. The output signals are identical on the A and B channels, but you can route them to different speakers and/or external amplifiers. A+B means you are sending signals to both at the same time. While my receiver did not have "matrix", I would suspect it would do something like send the left channel to A, and the right channel to B. It most likely is NOT quadrophonic, or front/rear capable.


Also tape monitor should have 2 pairs of RCA connectors, one for in, and one for out. This simply allows you to route your signal through an additional external device. This is still common on modern receivers/processors, and is very useful if you want to send a full, un-attenuated analog signal to a recording device or separate headphone amplifier. I use this connection on my processor for my Musical Fidelity X-Cans headphone amplifier, which allows me to "mute" my processor, so no signal goes to my amps/speakers, but still allows me to listen with headphones late at night. Most high-end home theater equipment does NOT come with a headphone jack (the audiophile tenet of keeping the signal path as simple as possible).
 
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