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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Some receivers can do TrueHD and some can't even though they have HDMI inputs. Why?


Also, what's HDMI pass-through?


Lastly, I've been told that with a source that can decode TrueHD audio, in particular a PS3, there is no need to have a receiver that will decode TrueHD. Simply get a receiver that has HDMI inputs. Is this true?


I originally thought about getting a cheap HTiB, but after reading all the buzz about TrueHD, I want some! TrueHD audio worth it???
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by esdub20 /forum/post/15479537


Some receivers can do TrueHD and some can't even though they have HDMI inputs. Why?

They do it for HDMI video switching. It allows for HDMI video sources, but keeps the receiver cheaper than an HDMI audio receiver.


Some can also receive audio over HDMI but don't decode TrueHD. Not very many of those, though. Mostly Sonys.

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Also, what's HDMI pass-through?

See above. It's those video switching receivers.

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Lastly, I've been told that with a source that can decode TrueHD audio, in particular a PS3, there is no need to have a receiver that will decode TrueHD. Simply get a receiver that has HDMI inputs. Is this true?

Well, it has to have HDMI audio. Some Sony's accept LPCM audio without the decoders, which works well with the Sony built PS3.


Other than Sony, most makers either have the HDMI pass-through receivers, or full on TrueHD decoding receivers. The decoding receivers can also accept a PS3's LPCM audio, though.

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I originally thought about getting a cheap HTiB, but after reading all the buzz about TrueHD, I want some! TrueHD audio worth it???

Up to you. It's your ears.


To me, there's a difference, but it's subtle. Good ol' Dolby Digital and DTS sound pretty good to me.
 

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This article is worth reading: http://www.hemagazine.com/node/Dolby...PCM?page=0%2C0


After listening to TrueHD with a high end setup under ideal conditions the writer notes:
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The shocker came when we compared the lower 448 kbps Dolby Digital DVD bitrate to the original. There was an audible difference, but it was only ever-so-slightly noticeable (and this is with a high end audio system in an acoustically controlled environment that is so far beyond what typical home theater systems are capable of resolving). There was just the slightest decrease in presence with the DD version, not exactly a softening of the sound, but just a tad less ambience and a similarly small tightening of the front soundstage's depth. Quite a remarkable result, I thought, and I was highly impressed with how much fidelity can be packed into such a relatively small amount of bitspace. If I was doing actual scoring, I would have awarded a 4.8 grade to the results I heard - the audible difference was that subtle.

I don't think it's worth fixating on TrueHD and then buy a HTiB or speaker package with 3 inch woofers that push little puffs of air - you're just not going to tell the difference. Having said that, HTiB set ups that include receivers like the Onkyo SR606 or similar AVR aren't too much more expensive and, aside from being TrueHD capable, offer other benefits as well. These receivers have enough connections (HDMI, optical, coaxial, pre-amp, etc...) and other features for you to expand as you change/upgrade your speakers and gear.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tulpa /forum/post/15479609


They do it for HDMI video switching. It allows for HDMI video sources, but keeps the receiver cheaper than an HDMI audio receiver.

Does this mean that you would still have to send audio to the receiver via another method such as RCA's or Toslink? If this is the case, then HDMI pass-through is pretty useless and nothing more than a sales gimmick.
 

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HDMI Switching is good for those HDTV's that may only have one HDMI input. Thus, you can connect the Cable/Sat box and blu-ray via HDMI to your TV.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by telemike /forum/post/15483879


HDMI Switching is good for those HDTV's that may only have one HDMI input. Thus, you can connect the Cable/Sat box and blu-ray via HDMI to your TV.

Ahhhhh...good point. Very good reason for those with only 1 HDMI input on their TV set.
 

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Samsung AS720 has some True-HD and DTS-HD pass-through, meaning if the PS3 can send it LPCM then it can play it. Pass-through as i understand it means no processing of the signal coming from the hdmi(s), BUT there is video pass-through, audio pass-through and a/v pass-through, The thing is if the reciever can handle AUDIO over hdmi or not, if it can but can't decode worth a darn then you'll need a good player that can decode everything for it. IF it can decode everything then the player doesn't matter as it will bitstream to the reciever, ONLY if the player can bitstream the audio over HDMI. IF the receiver cannot do audio over HDMI then yes, you need to use TOSlink or something else.


The above may not be 100% accurate but its how i understand it, so many only/if/else it seems like its code, lol.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by esdub20 /forum/post/15484604


Ahhhhh...good point. Very good reason for those with only 1 HDMI input on their TV set.

That and one button push to switch video and audio. Convenience factor. Although a good universal remote with macro capability mitigates that, but not everyone has that type of remote (they can get fairly pricey.)


It's all about filling certain pricepoints. HDMI audio is not really entry level yet, although it's cheaper than it was a few years ago.
 

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On the back of my energy c100's there are 4 connectors. Two black on the left and two red on the right. Connecting the two black is a piece of metal....do I remove this? Same goes for the two red....a piece of metal connects the two red.


Thanks


Also why 4 connectors?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by treepop /forum/post/15618414


On the back of my energy c100's there are 4 connectors. Two black on the left and two red on the right. Connecting the two black is a piece of metal....do I remove this? Same goes for the two red....a piece of metal connects the two red.


Thanks


Also why 4 connectors?

Don't remove the metal piece, just connect the speaker wire to the bottom binding post.


The 4 binding posts are supposed to be for bi-amping or bi-wiring the tweeter and woofer separate. Look into it if you want, but the consensus is that it doesn't make a difference. The 4 binding posts are really there to give you the perception of added value.
 

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Even if your TV has multiple HDMI inputs, most TVs can only output two-channel audio over the TOSLINK out (f'ing copyright protections). Therefore, to get DD5.1 or better you have to run the audio signal directly to the receiver via either HDMI or a TOSLINK. To get TrueHD, you have to run HDMI directly to the reciever.


If you're running audio to the receiver, it's a lot cleaner to run the video through too. That way you only have to run one cable to the TV (instead of one to the TV and one to the receiver for every device). That's why the HDMI video pass-through is important (and, in general, the more HDMI inputs on the receiver, the better).


Bear in mind that many recievers will not upscale component to HDMI, so you might have to run both a component video and HDMI cable to the TV if your source only has component out (e.g., a Wii or some STBs).


Now, if you're running the a/v to the receiver via HDMI to get DD5.1, TrueHD, etc., it's important that your receiver either (i) have the necessary decoders built in, or (ii) be able to process an LPCM (decoded) stream from a player with the necessary decoders.


In general, disc players (whether DVD, Blu-Ray, Playstation) are far more capable decoders (and you will find a lot more decoding variety). For this reason, it's best to have a receiver that will handle LPCM (i.e., a decoded audio stream), so that it can handle anything your player can decode (including future formats). That's the reason for the sticky at the top of the HTiB page.


As a side note, rather than have LPCM processing capability, you could also have analog inputs, but many devices like the PS3 don't have analog out, so your receiver better be able to handle LPCM via HDMI or have the necessary built-in decoders.


I'm no expert, but I think I have all this dialed in pretty well. Thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by forkthis /forum/post/15626767


Even if your TV has multiple HDMI inputs, most TVs can only output two-channel audio over the TOSLINK out (f'ing copyright protections). Therefore, to get DD5.1 or better you have to run the audio signal directly to the receiver via either HDMI or a TOSLINK. To get TrueHD, you have to run HDMI directly to the reciever.


If you're running audio to the receiver, it's a lot cleaner to run the video through too. That way you only have to run one cable to the TV (instead of one to the TV and one to the receiver for every device). That's why the HDMI video pass-through is important (and, in general, the more HDMI inputs on the receiver, the better).


Bear in mind that many recievers will not upscale component to HDMI, so you might have to run both a component video and HDMI cable to the TV if your source only has component out (e.g., a Wii or some STBs).


Now, if you're running the a/v to the receiver via HDMI to get DD5.1, TrueHD, etc., it's important that your receiver either (i) have the necessary decoders built in, or (ii) be able to process an LPCM (decoded) stream from a player with the necessary decoders.


In general, disc players (whether DVD, Blu-Ray, Playstation) are far more capable decoders (and you will find a lot more decoding variety). For this reason, it's best to have a receiver that will handle LPCM (i.e., a decoded audio stream), so that it can handle anything your player can decode (including future formats). That's the reason for the sticky at the top of the HTiB page.


As a side note, rather than have LPCM processing capability, you could also have analog inputs, but many devices like the PS3 don't have analog out, so your receiver better be able to handle LPCM via HDMI or have the necessary built-in decoders.


I'm no expert, but I think I have all this dialed in pretty well. Thoughts?

Thanks for the informational post.


I just picked up a Sony HT-SS2000 late last night. Granted it's a HTiB, for the price I paid (under my original budget of $250) I don't think I could have done better. I believe Sony made this unit to compliment Blu-ray players and the PS3 perfectly. This unit is accepts Linear PCM which is decoded by my PS3. Obviously there are systems out there that will sound 100X better, but I was honestly surprised at how well this system sounds. I could not be happier.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by esdub20 /forum/post/15630175


Thanks for the informational post.


I just picked up a Sony HT-SS2000 late last night. Granted it's a HTiB, for the price I paid (under my original budget of $250) I don't think I could have done better. I believe Sony made this unit to compliment Blu-ray players and the PS3 perfectly. This unit is accepts Linear PCM which is decoded by my PS3. Obviously there are systems out there that will sound 100X better, but I was honestly surprised at how well this system sounds. I could not be happier.

Right on man. My HT-7200DH shows up today. I hope it sounds as well as your SS2000.
 
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