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I'm trying to decide the best construction technique for sound deadening my room when I speak to an architect.


Assuming you were to do construction from scratch like me, what would your choice be for materials?


Would you use a staggered stud layout? Or a floating wall on metal tracks? Or would you use something else?


What about for the ceiling?


~Don
 

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Hi Don,


If you have the choice, double-stud construction, with double drywall on both sides, will provide high sound isolation. The inner studs also offer the critical opportunity to acoustically isolate the ceiling, by fastening the joists to these studs only.


Regards,

Terry
 

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Or if you really want isolation, build a room within a room using RSIC clips to attach the walls to the existing joists and your own joists in between. Still use the double drywall on both sides that Terry mentioned.
 

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search for sound isolation on this forum, or check out the link in my profile if you like, i tried in that thread (airborne sound isolation) to cover the basics.
 

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Here is what I did in my basement HT room (as part of an entire basement finishing project).


2 walls of the HT room are concrete foundation walls. There I used single 2x4 stud walls. One other wall is double 2x4 stud walls. This made sense for that wall as it is the wall that runs along the center I-beam of the house. So, one of the double walls is just inside the I-beam, but not touching it. The other wall is under the I-beam and fastened to it with powder actuated fasteners.


The fourth wall, perpendicular to both the double wall and one of the foundation walls is staggered 2x4 stud construction on 2x6 plates. This wall is mostly shared with a full bath, so this made sense to me.


The ceiling is framed using 2x6's with 2x4s fastened to the top (sort of half of an I-beam) to stabilized the 2x6s. These are fastened to the tops of the inner wall along the steel I-beam on one side and the foundation stud wall on the other side. The 2x6s are hung in between the existing floor joists of the floor above the basement. Also, the bottoms of the new 2x6 joists are about an inch below the bottoms of the existing floor joists. Likewise, the tops of all of the perimeter walls are about an inch below the existing floor joists. Thus, the whole HT room is tied together using the new 2x6 joists to stiffen the walls. In addition, of course they are nailed and blocked at the corners, and they are fastened to the slab floor with powder actuated fasteners. So, it is quite a solid design.


As for the wall board, I am using double layers of 1/2 inch sheetrock with Green Glue between the layers and GG applied to all framing member surfaces where there is contact with the first layer of drywall.


Oh, and there is 3" of rockwool (Roxul brand) batts in the ceiling and wall cavities - 2 layers in the double wall cavities.


I am not convinced RSICs are worth the money, and I do not want a floating wall.


I believe this design will provide the best value solution.


I did a lot of reading and researching on the issues surrounding sound control and concluded that this design would afford significant isolation of sound, especially lower frequency sounds to the HT room and also keep sound transmission to the upper levels of the house to a minimum. I also believed this is the least cost solution to achieve high levels of soiund attentuation.


I did not deem the addition of RSICs or other materials such as bulk vinyl or other mass barriers to be worth the additional costs and/or installation considerations.


I am in the process of hanging drywall right now, so I guess we'll see how things work out reasonably soon.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sleepy hollow
As for the wall board, I am using double layers of 1/2 inch sheetrock with Green Glue between the layers and GG applied to all framing member surfaces where there is contact with the first layer of drywall.
Is that on both sides of all walls? Or just on the insides?


I assume the framing along the 2 concrete walls is offset from them, not actually attached, right?


(Strike that last question -- I found your answer on another thread: "I am using 3/4" extruded polystyrene against the concrete foundation walls. Then the studs are snug up against that...")
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DigitalGriffin
I'm trying to decide the best construction technique for sound deadening my room when I speak to an architect.


Assuming you were to do construction from scratch like me, what would your choice be for materials?


Would you use a staggered stud layout? Or a floating wall on metal tracks? Or would you use something else?


What about for the ceiling?


~Don
Speaking as somene who works for an A/E firm:


If you are hiring an Architect (which I highly, highly recommend), I would hope that he would have a firm understanding of these concepts, and he should be able to tell you what fits your budget/home/needs the best. If not, and a home theater is high on your priority list, maybe it is time to find another Architect, or have him hire as a consultant one of the many acoustic engineers (I've read that their prices can be very reasonable).


You are spending good money on his services, he is the professional who should be educating you, not the other way around. You definitely want someone who is very experanced in these areas and can draw up good details and specs, or you may end up with this: http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=562111


Let everyone know what he recommends, and we can tell you if he is smoking something.
 
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