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Recently, I've picked up two new DVD's (Wolf Creek and Employee of the Month). Both of these disc's boxes and the disc's themselves say 'widescreen' on them.


Yet, when I play these movies in my DVD player, they both play in fullscreen. I've gone through and double-checked my settings on both my HDTV and DVD player, and both are set for 16:9 widescreen formats. Also, when I play an older widescreen movie (The Matrix, Napolean Dynamite), they play in widescreen perfectly.


The only thing that I can think of is if my idea of widescreen (long, narrow picture with black bars above and below said picture) has been wrong all along.


Anyone out there that can help me with this? I'm stumped as to what to do.
 

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So...even though the disc says 'widescreen', its outputting a fullscreen version of the 'widescreen' format? I guess I'm still not understanding why its doing this after reading the Wikipedia page.


Is there anyway to change this?
 

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on a 16:9 HDTV, 1.78:1 perfectly fills the screen.


4:3 will gives bars on the sides (assuming you're not stretching the picture to fill)


1.85:1 will give very slim (possibly not noticeable depending on overscan etc) bars, top and bottom.


etc.
 

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Well if the ratio is 1:78 it's designed to fill a widescreen. It is NOT Full Screen. Full Screen on a Widescreen TV (assuming you dont streach it) will have black bars on the side.


If the Widescreen ratio was say 2:35 you would see the black bars top and bottom even on a widescreen TV. I just looked up the Matrix and while it too is Widescreen its ratio is 2.35.


Far as I know 1:78 is true widescreen (which I prefer myself) but a higher ratios is also used for more cinematic feel.


From the bottom of the wiki entry.


1.19:1: "Movietone" - early 35 mm sound film ratio used in the late 1920s and early 1930s, especially in Europe. The optical soundtrack was placed on the side of the 1.33 frame, thus reducing the width of the frame. The Academy Aperture frame (1.37) fixed this by making the frame lines thicker. The best examples of this ratio are Fritz Lang's first sound films: M and The Testament of Dr. Mabuse. This is roughly the frame size used for anamorphic photography today.

1.25:1: Commonly used computer resolution of 1280x1024. Native aspect ratio of many LCDs. Also the aspect ratio of 4x5 film photos. The British 405 line TV system used this aspect ratio from its beginning in the 1930s until 1950 when it changed to the more common 4:3 format.

1.33:1: 35 mm original silent film ratio, common in TV and video as 4:3. Also standard ratio for IMAX and MPEG-2 video compression.

1.37:1: 35 mm full-screen sound film image, nearly universal in movies between 1932 and 1953. Officially adopted as the Academy ratio in 1932 by AMPAS. Still occasionally used. Also standard 16 mm.

1.43:1: IMAX 70 mm horizontal format.

1.5:1: The aspect ratio of 35 mm film used for still photography. Wide-aspect computer display (3:2). Used in Apple PowerBook G4 15.2" displays with resolutions of most recently 1440x960.

1.504:1: The aspect ratio of some digital SLR cameras, such as the Nikon D70.

1.56:1: Widescreen aspect ratio 14:9. Often used in shooting commercials etc. as a compromise format between TV 4:3 (12:9) and Widescreen 16:9, especially when the output will be used in both standard TV and widescreen. When converted to a 16:9 frame, only a small portion of the picture is lost, and when converted to 4:3 there is only slight letterboxing.

1.6:1: computer display widescreen (8:5, commonly referred to as 16:10). Used in WSXGAPlus, WUXGA and other display resolutions. This aspect ratio has been chosen for many modern widescreen computer displays because of its ability to display two full pages of text side by side. [1]

1.66:1: 35 mm European widescreen standard; Super 16 mm. (5:3, sometimes expressed more accurately as "1.67".)

1.75:1: early 35 mm widescreen ratio, since abandoned.
1.78:1: video widescreen standard (16:9). Also used in high-definition television One of 3 ratios specified for MPEG-2 video compression.

1.85:1: 35 mm US and UK widescreen standard for theatrical film. Uses approximately 3 perforations ("perfs") of image space per 4 perf frame; films can be shot in 3-perf to save cost of film stock. Also known as "flat".


2.00:1: Used primarily as a flat format in the 1950s and early 1960s by Universal-International, as well as Paramount for some of their VistaVision titles. Also used as one of the variable anamorphic ratios with SuperScope.

2.2:1: 70 mm standard. Originally developed for Todd-AO in the 1950s. 2.21:1 specified for MPEG-2 but not used.
2.35:1 : 35 mm anamorphic prior to 1970, used by CinemaScope ("'Scope") and early Panavision. The anamorphic standard has subtly changed so that modern anamorphic productions are actually 2.39[1], but often referred to as 2.35 anyway, due to old convention. (Note that anamorphic refers to the print and not necessarily the negative.)

2.39:1: 35 mm anamorphic from 1970 onwards. Sometimes rounded up to 2.40[1]. Sometimes referred to as 'Scope.

2.55:1: Original aspect ratio of CinemaScope before optical sound was added to the film. This was also the aspect ratio of CinemaScope 55.

2.59:1: Cinerama at full height (three specially captured 35 mm images projected side-by-side into one composite widescreen image).

2.76:1: MGM Camera 65 (65 mm with 1.25x anamorphic squeeze). Only used on a handful of films between 1956 and 1964, such as Ben-Hur (1959).

4:1: Polyvision, three 35 mm 1.33 images projected side by side. Only used on Abel Gance's Napoléon (1927).
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by AboutRound /forum/post/0


So...even though the disc says 'widescreen', its outputting a fullscreen version of the 'widescreen' format? I guess I'm still not understanding why its doing this after reading the Wikipedia page.


Is there anyway to change this?

You can go into your TV's service menu and tweek the overscan because most 1.85:1 movies will fill up your screen. Only 2.35:1 will have black bars.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by AboutRound /forum/post/0


So is this the new 'norm' for widescreen DVD's? A few years back, widescreen meant widescreen with a black bar above and below.


I've grown to love that version of widescreen.

On a none Widescreen TV this ratio 1:78 will have black bars top and bottom. On a Widescreen it won't. For me I did not pay all this money to have wasted space. However I always respect the directors vision.


Just look at the ratio when buying wide screen so you know what to expect here out. Lots are in either 1:78 or 2:35. I do like the 1:85 just not much out there I think.


cheers
 

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Widescreen means wider than 1.37:1, the Academy ratio, which is usally presented as 1.33:1 on fullscreen DVDs, which is what regular TVs are - i.e., 1.33:1 (4:3).


Widescreen TVs adopt a standard size of 16:9 = 1.78:1. Maybe in the future widescreen TVs will be 2.35:1, in which case 1.78:1 and 1.85:1 movies will have black bars on the sides, like 1.33:1 movies presently have on current widescreen TVs.


Widescreen LCD computer monitors, however, are 16:10 = 1.6:1. Thus, when watching a 1.78:1 or 1.85:1 DVD on a widescreen computer monitor, which normally completely fill a widescreen TV, you will either get black bars at the top and bottom, or the picture will be distorted a bit to make a 16:9 image (which is what all widescreen movies are, whether they are 1.78:1 or 2.35:1; on 2.35:1 movies, the black bars represent information lost to the 16:9 window) fit/fill a 16:10 screen.
 

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I think the terminology issue here is that some displays use the term "fullscreen" to mean fill the 16x9 screen. Fullscreen DVDs are basing the term on filling 4:3 TV screens. Can't win. Just get rid of 4:3 content and we're all set.



larry
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by AboutRound /forum/post/0


Okay, now riddle me this:


I purchase a DVD dubbed 'widescreen', yet its aspect ratio is 1.78:1. Is this movie actually in widescreen format, yet it's just filling the entire screen?

Correct!


On a Widescreen TV it fills the entire Screen. If it was a standard TV (4:3) it would have black bars top/bottom.


1:78:1 is the current widescreen TV Standard.
 

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Yes it's widescreen. You have a widescreen TV. This particular AR matches the AR of your TV (which is a particular 16:9 widescreen format) so there are no bars. Many (or most) films are actually wider than 16:9, and those are also widescreen. On your TV they will have bars.


On a 4:3 TV, all of those films would have bars.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by AboutRound /forum/post/0


Okay, now riddle me this:


I purchase a DVD dubbed 'widescreen', yet its aspect ratio is 1.78:1. Is this movie actually in widescreen format, yet it's just filling the entire screen?


Fullscreen just means that it was cropped to fill a 4:3 TV. When a DVD says widescreen it just means that the DVD outputs in the films OAR, when that OAR is other than 4:3.


As a reference, the widescreen version of Saving Private Ryan is 1.85:1 so when overscan is factored in, it will fill up your 16:9 TV. If you had a 4:3 TV and the widescreen version of the movie you would get black bars.


Other movies like Star Wars and LOTR are shot even wider than SPR, and have an aspect ratio of 2.35:1. In this case the widescreen dvd has black bars on a 16:9 TV, because the films aspect ratio is greater than 16:9. On a 4:3 you would get even larger black bars than SPR had.


Most older movies, like Wizard of Oz were shot in a 4:3 aspect ratio, so they would have black bars on the side on a widescreen display, but would fill up a 4:3 display
 
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