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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I am currently powering a pair of CW cls 12's with a rx-v800rds, so no amplifier in between(planning to get that in the future though). Due to the difference in W rms on the speakers(210w) and the max output of the receiver(100w) I know clipping is bound to happen, however I have no idea from which volume/volume range it will occur and I am worried that I won't notice the clipping when it does occur.

Is there anyone who has a approximate volume range from when it may start clipping with this setup?
 

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I'm a bit confused? Yamaha makes an RX-V800 and Pioneer makes a VSX-808RDS. I can't seem to find the model number you are quoting? Anyway, depending on the number of channels driven, the lower the actual power output per channel will be. By this I mean, if you are only driving 2 channels, you'll probably get close to the claimed 100 watts per channel, but if you are driving 5 channels, you'll probably only be getting about 50-60 watts per channel, if you're lucky. Clipping occurs when you overdrive your amplifier and cause it to send a corrupted audio signal to your speakers. Remember when you were at school and you saw a nice smooth sine wave curve on the oscilloscope; well, clipping is the exact opposite of that. If I was you, I really wouldn't drive my amplifier much past about 80-85% of its output capacity. And don't worry about not noticing when clipping occurs, your speakers will certainly tell you, very quickly. They'll sound like the speaker drivers are rattling or making a crackling sound. By this time, it's probably too late to turn down the volume. In fact, it's probably time to go out and buy yourself some nice new speakers. Plus, playing any type of audio, in a closed environment, for long periods of time, will most definitely do you some very serious, long-term hearing damage. I can guarantee it. If you are using this in an auditorium or outdoor environment, I'd suggest you buy yourself a better setup, that can handle the types of volume levels you are looking for. I'm sure others will be able to give you some advice as well. Good luck.
 
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I am currently powering a pair of CW cls 12's with a rx-v808rds, so no amplifier in between(planning to get that in the future though). Due to the difference in W rms on the speakers(210w) and the max output of the receiver(100w) I know clipping is bound to happen, however I have no idea from which volume/volume range it will occur and I am worried that I won't notice the clipping when it does occur.

Is there anyone who has a approximate volume range from when it may start clipping with this setup?

Clipping is a form of distortion that occurs when an amplifier is overdriven and attempts to deliver an output voltage or current level beyond its maximum capability.

A watt rating for a speaker is somewhat abstract, but usually refers to a maximum power level before the speaker is driven into compression.

Trying to match the two does not necessary result in a benefit with regards to sound quality or performance. It's kind of an apples and oranges comparison.

An amplifier can clip before a speaker is driven into compression and vice versa. So again, trying to match the two values is not necessary of benefit.

Generally, the more useful value is understanding a speakers sensitivity rating and the sound pressure level it's capable of producing mitigated by the listening distance and the desired sound pressure level (SPL) at that distance.

Most of the time, at normal listening levels, people are using less than 1 watt for a given amplifier and speaker combination when setting 10-12 feet away or 3-4 meters.

It takes 2X the power or a doubling of power to achieve a 3dB gain in SPL. In other words a 3dB gain would be achieved moving from 1 watt to 2 watts or 10 watts to 20 watts.

It requires a 10dB gain in SPL to have the perception of the volume level being twice as loud. Or in other words, SPL at 1 watt would would require 10X the power or 10 watts to sound twice as loud. And SPL achieved with 10 watts would require 100 watts to be twice as loud. a 10X.

The amplifier could very well clip depending on the desired SPL which would have very little to do with a given speakers physical capability of handlining capability. And likewise, a given amplifier could have sufficient to drive a given speaker into compression before the amplifier clips.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'm a bit confused? Yamaha makes an RX-V800 and Pioneer makes a VSX-808RDS. I can't seem to find the model number you are quoting? Anyway, depending on the number of channels driven, the lower the actual power output per channel will be. By this I mean, if you are only driving 2 channels, you'll probably get close to the claimed 100 watts per channel, but if you are driving 5 channels, you'll probably only be getting about 50-60 watts per channel, if you're lucky. Clipping occurs when you overdrive your amplifier and cause it to send a corrupted audio signal to your speakers. Remember when you were at school and you saw a nice smooth sine wave curve on the oscilloscope; well, clipping is the exact opposite of that. If I was you, I really wouldn't drive my amplifier much past about 80-85% of its output capacity. And don't worry about not noticing when clipping occurs, your speakers will certainly tell you, very quickly. They'll sound like the speaker drivers are rattling or making a crackling sound. By this time, it's probably too late to turn down the volume. In fact, it's probably time to go out and buy yourself some nice new speakers. Plus, playing any type of audio, in a closed environment, for long periods of time, will most definitely do you some very serious, long-term hearing damage. I can guarantee it. If you are using this in an auditorium or outdoor environment, I'd suggest you buy yourself a better setup, that can handle the types of volume levels you are looking for. I'm sure others will be able to give you some advice as well. Good luck.
Thanks. The model number of the receiver is corrected now.
 
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