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Yeah, cables are going to be more of an issue this time around. I currently use a 15ft one so would have to go fiber if I ever got a 4K120 AVR. There’s a good thread discussing it here https://www.avsforum.com/forum/168-...erly-reliably-support-48-gbps-hdmi-2-1-a.html

Projector people still have a bit of time. Most likely there will be AVRs with multiple 4K120 ports by then. And we still don’t know what the other AVR manufacturers will have.

My AVR is from 2013 or so... it can’t do Atmos or 4k60. I’m looking for an AVR now.

However, I won’t buy an AVR that’s limited at inception due to lack of modern ports. I don’t want to chuck an AVR after a year or even 3...

And for sure, there will be sources and displays that require this sooner than I’ll want to replace the AVR.

For me, it means sticking with the really old AVR I have now for even more years, which I’m prepared to do if I must.

Let’s see what the other AVR makers do...

At worst I can buy a cheap stop gap AVR , but yeah no investing in high end, crippled AVR - knowing it’s crippled out the gate.


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How useful would multiple ARC/eARC ports really be?

The utility of ARC/eARC is to send Audio to an external device, how many people need to send audio to multiple external receivers?


I can see the utility of multiple ports for other aspects of HDMI 2.1 but eARC?
No, you're right I got it mixed up, been in lock down for so long I'm feeling like the Torrance family: "All work and no HDMI 2.1 makes Jack a dull boy"
 

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For people upgrading their TV in the coming years, eARC is a must.
It is the only way to get high resolution multichannel audio from the internal apps of the TV or from a source directly connected to the TV.
One eARC hdmi 2.0 port available on the AVR is sufficient for 4k movie content.
As said before all sources are connected to the TV and in that case the AVR is only an audio peripheral.
Let us hope that TV and AVR manufacturers will implement eARC on all their products.



One remark: regarding movie content, 4k DV (and may be HDR10+) format is sufficient for the coming years.
 

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For people upgrading their TV in the coming years, eARC is a must.
It is the only way to get high resolution multichannel audio from the internal apps of the TV or from a source directly connected to the TV.
One eARC hdmi 2.0 port available on the AVR is sufficient for 4k movie content.
As said before all sources are connected to the TV and in that case the AVR is only an audio peripheral.
Let us hope that TV and AVR manufacturers will implement eARC on all their products.

One remark: regarding movie content, 4k DV (and may be HDR10+) format is sufficient for the coming years.
Not necessarily. A couple of reasons why many (myself included) will likely never use ARC/eARC.

1. Using ARC/eARC usually does not allow the AVR's GUI/OSD to appear (as the video source is not passing through the AVR).
2. Using a 3rd party device (eg. Roku, Firestick, Chromecast, etc.) connected to the AVR is far more reliable, often providing access to many more apps, and is able to be transferred from TV to TV.
 

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For people upgrading their TV in the coming years, eARC is a must.
It is the only way to get high resolution multichannel audio from the internal apps of the TV or from a source directly connected to the TV.
One eARC hdmi 2.0 port available on the AVR is sufficient for 4k movie content.
As said before all sources are connected to the TV and in that case the AVR is only an audio peripheral.
Let us hope that TV and AVR manufacturers will implement eARC on all their products.

One remark: regarding movie content, 4k DV (and may be HDR10+) format is sufficient for the coming years.
I'm currently waiting on the new Sony 77" OLED and PS5 Pro that's coming out next year and do not plan on using the tvs internal apps, I prefer the video and audio quality from my AppleTV 4K or xfinity X1 cable box.
 
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Is there such a thing as USB powered wireless optical bridge to stick behind tv and send that to an older AVR?
 

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Is there such a thing as USB powered wireless optical bridge to stick behind tv and send that to an older AVR?
Pretty much all the ones I've seen are pair with Bluetooth speakers or headphones. You may want to start a new topic about this as it has nothing to do with upcoming AVRs with HDMI 2.1 features.
 

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I was thinking as a workaround till AVR's arrive and for those W/O eARC
Toslink optical cable or an ARC extractor would be the best bet. Wireless audio from TV to AVR looks to be too niche of a product. eARC extractors are very scarce.
 

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My AVR is from 2013 or so... it can’t do Atmos or 4k60. I’m looking for an AVR now.

However, I won’t buy an AVR that’s limited at inception due to lack of modern ports. I don’t want to chuck an AVR after a year or even 3...

And for sure, there will be sources and displays that require this sooner than I’ll want to replace the AVR.

For me, it means sticking with the really old AVR I have now for even more years, which I’m prepared to do if I must.

Let’s see what the other AVR makers do...

At worst I can buy a cheap stop gap AVR , but yeah no investing in high end, crippled AVR - knowing it’s crippled out the gate.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

My AVR is older than yours and can't even do 4k at all let alone Atmos, plus the surround outputs no longer work. I desperately need a new one right now and the wait for these HDMI 2.1 AVRs is killing me. I don't want to spend a bunch of money on one and have it be obsolete in a year either. The cheaper ones don't seem to have the power to drive my new speakers or I'd just buy a stop gap.
 

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My AVR is older than yours and can't even do 4k at all let alone Atmos, plus the surround outputs no longer work. I desperately need a new one right now and the wait for these HDMI 2.1 AVRs is killing me. I don't want to spend a bunch of money on one and have it be obsolete in a year either. The cheaper ones don't seem to have the power to drive my new speakers or I'd just buy a stop gap.
My stop gap AVR ended up becoming my permanent AVR when I got an Xbox One X and found it works perfectly hooked up to my TV with eARC for audio return. What's your definition of "cheaper ones"?
 

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My stop gap AVR ended up becoming my permanent AVR when I got an Xbox One X and found it works perfectly hooked up to my TV with eARC for audio return. What's your definition of "cheaper ones"?
It's passing 7.1 uncompressed via eARC without any issues?
 

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My stop gap AVR ended up becoming my permanent AVR when I got an Xbox One X and found it works perfectly hooked up to my TV with eARC for audio return. What's your definition of "cheaper ones"?

Something $500 or less I guess? When I picked up speakers recently it was recommended that I find an AVR capable of at least 100 watts per channel in a 5.1.2 configuration. I've been out of the game for awhile and am definitely no expert, but it looks like most of the lower-end AVRs fall short of that. If you have a stop gap recommendation I'd love to hear it! Just about anything would be better than what I've got now.



I'm using a projector so eARC isn't as convenient of a solution for me. I think I've got awhile before affordable 2.1 projectors are available though, so that stop gap might last a little longer than if I were using a TV. I just hate to spend money on something now when I know newer models with 2.1 are almost here.
 

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It's passing 7.1 uncompressed via eARC without any issues?
I'm using Dolby Atmos which uses 7.1 uncompressed as the base layer. For regular LPCM 7.1 my TV (LG C9) has a bug where it won't pass it. LG is working on a fix and we're expecting it next firmware update. They just have to update the EDID. If you're gaming on Windows 10 then you can use CRU to edit the EDID and it passes through eARC no problem.

The latest LG CX firmware has the fix already.
 

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Avenar, what is your AVR that has a working eARC?
I need to buy one in 2020 or 2021 (my AVR is 10 years old).
And hdmi 2.1 may not be not yet available at a decent price.
 

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Avenar, what is your AVR that has a working eARC?
I need to buy one in 2020 or 2021 (my AVR is 10 years old).
And hdmi 2.1 may not be not yet available at a decent price.
I have a Denon X6500H and used to use a X3500H. Both work with eARC from the C9. They’re the 2018 models. The 2019 models also don’t have issues.
 

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I'm using Dolby Atmos which uses 7.1 uncompressed as the base layer. For regular LPCM 7.1 my TV (LG C9) has a bug where it won't pass it. LG is working on a fix and we're expecting it next firmware update. They just have to update the EDID. If you're gaming on Windows 10 then you can use CRU to edit the EDID and it passes through eARC no problem.

The latest LG CX firmware has the fix already.
Don't you think it was quite foolish of LG to not release the 2020 models with working LPCM 5.1/7.1 support upon release, strange it too needed a firmware fix.

I know one can only speculate at this point because there are no 2.1 chipset AVRs but I wonder if eARC will work more reliably compared to the currently implemented 2.0b chipsets, as owners have discovered with D+M's 2017 AVRs compatibility has been disappointing.
 

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I have read that the 2017 D&M receivers can be made to work with eARC once they're sent back to service.
Does anyone know if:
A) This is correct
B) If so, what do the technicians do that users can't achieve via firmware?
 
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