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I continue to read about the next round of dvd players supporting 720p. Interestingly enough, very few HDTV (current or upcoming) seem to support 720p. Aren't we missing out on a BIG improvement in picture quality by not having this? Am I going to be really bummed having a 480p HDTV?
 

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Please point me to some info on dvds supporting 720p. I found a model number for sampo (DVE720p) but no info.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by DarthJedi:
Please point me to some info on dvds supporting 720p. I found a model number for sampo (DVE720p) but no info.
Here you go:
http://www.theperfectvision.com/howto/howto_tech_9.htm


Go to the bottom of the article titled "The future of progressive scan DVD".


Chris
 

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The 56" Panasonic (discontinued?) is one of the few current HDTV's that supports 720p.


This is just speculation on my part, but I should think we'll see 1080i DVD players as the next wave. They may still just be playing 480i DVD's upscaled, mind you, at first anyway, until a new HD DVD format becomes a standard. There are so few sets out there that support 720p that I don't think 720p DVD players will be anything more than a little side market with high prices.


-Abdul
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Abdul Jalib:


This is just speculation on my part, but I should think we'll see 1080i DVD players as the next wave. They may still just be playing 480i DVD's upscaled, mind you, at first anyway, until a new HD DVD format becomes a standard. There are so few sets out there that support 720p that I don't think 720p DVD players will be anything more than a little side market with high prices.


-Abdul
You must not have read the link I posted. Joe Kane, who knows a thing or two about video, makes it clear that we are a lot further away from 1080i DVD players than 720p DVD players. I'll trust Joe Kane on this one I think.


I'm sure several manufacturers will produce converters to make 720p viewable on 1080i sets....but the DVD players themselves will most likely output a native 720p signal.


Chris


 

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I know Joe Kane has been pushing 720p as the next DVD format but I don't think it will happen. Currently there are very few sets/displays capable of displaying 720p. Add to this the biggest supporter of 720p (Panasonic) has abandoned it on most (if not all) of their new HD sets. It just is not economically feasible for a company to introduce a new technology that very few people can use. The only way I can see it working is if the DVD player is capable of outputting either 720p or 1080i. I for one will not purchase a DVD player that only outputs 720p only to be required to purchase an adaptor for my HDTV. I suspect many others here feel the same way.
 

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My Sampo SME-34WHD5 supports 720p. I have a PC hooked to it, doing 1280x720 @ 60Hz, and the upconverted DVD's look pretty good on it.


But, it sounds like the article linked above is talking about a whole new DVD format that would enable a true high resolution DVD at 720p. That would be nice, but I'm not getting my hopes up.
 

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Quote:
the biggest supporter of 720p (Panasonic) has abandoned it on most (if not all) of their new HD sets.
I thought the current 56" and 65" Panasonic RPTVs support 720p

and the Panasonic plasma too.
 

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There really is no upconversion or downconversion, per say. The MPEG format is "format free". When the MPEG stream is decoded it can output either 720p or 1080i. This process is equivelent to what happens on a HTPC. The issues are that 720p, 24 frames/sec is acheivable now. There is almost as much screen resolution as 1080i, but less movement artifact. Its a tradeoff. Static images won't be as sharp, but fast moving images won't comb.


SM
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Will:
I thought the current 56" and 65" Panasonic RPTVs support 720p

and the Panasonic plasma too.
The current models do but I'm pretty sure the new models coming out later this year only do 480p and 1080i. I seem to remember a big discussion about it when the CES press releases came out.

 

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Since it seems pretty common for current HDTV STBs to take a 720p signal and output it as 1080i, what would be the problem with having DVD players convert 720p DVDs to 1080i? While the next DVD format may be 720p, I will be very surprised if the DVD players only output 720p. They'd have an even smaller market then HD does now.


--Andrew
 

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There's a difference between: 1) taking a current, 480 x 720-encoded DVD and putting it into a DVD player that can upconvert it to 720p format, and 2) making new 720 x 1280-encoded DVDs and playing them in new players that support the format.


I seriously doubt the latter will come to pass any time soon, because it means developing new DVD titles that are incompatible with current DVD players. You could do this by burning your own discs using DVD-RW (or +RW or whatever), but you'd have to play it on a computer, not in a conventional player.


Another problem is that a 720x1280-encoded material takes up almost 3x as much space on the disc. This limits the titles and features you can put on a disk.


I think it's much more likely that we won't see increased resolution on pre-recorded DVD media until the hardware goes to shorter-wavelength lasers and increased raw capacity. This is probably at least a few years out - there's still plenty of life left in the current-generation DVD consumer cycle.
 

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Quote:
> I thought the current 56" and 65" Panasonic RPTVs

> support 720p and the Panasonic plasma too.


The current models do but I'm pretty sure the new models coming out later this year only do 480p and 1080i. I seem to remember a big discussion about it when the CES press releases came out.
I don't recall reading that 56" and 65" RPTVs won't

do 720p, but did read that smaller-sized Panasonic RPTVs

would not do 720p.


Incidentally, I don't know how much longer the current 56"

and 65" Panasonic RPTV models will be made.
 

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The biggest factor in delaying HD-DVD has got to be Hollywood not wanting to release the films at such a high resolution.
 

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When Hollywood does do HD-DVD's they will probably want to have the old format on one side and HDTV on the other side. This way the software can be forward and backward compatible. IMHO


As for 720p: when searching for an HDTV recently I found the lack of 720p support very disappointing. If I had a choice between the 65H80 I bought and a 65H80 with 720p for an extra $800 I would have chose the later.


-Tim


------------------

Remember to e-mail ESPN, Fox Sports Net and The Discovery Channel often, requesting HDTV.

Click here to e-mail ESPN

Click here to e-mail Fox Sports

Click here to e-mail Discovery Channel
 

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As for products that support HDTV -


(1) All three of the Mitsubishi, Panasonic, and Hitachi 1280x720 single-chip DLP rear-protection TV sets support 720p/60 native.


(2) Princeton has a new pair of DTV-ready sets, the Ai3.2HD (32" 4x3) and Ai3.6HD (36" 4x3). Both have one component HD nd one component interlaced input, plus the usual composite and S-video, and even 15-pin VGA jacks.


(3) Princeton also continues to sell the AF3.0HD which is a 16x9 32" set that accepts 720p/60. Cosmetically, it's a bit bulky and looks kinda military/industrial. In terms of performance, it's first rate.


(4) All of the 42" and 50" plasma panels currently offered for sale support 720p, but remember that the 42" panels are mostly 852x480 pixels, so they are scaling 720p down to a 480-line format. The 50" panels are usually 1280x768 (Pioneer) or 1365x768 (Fujitsu, NEC, Panasonic).


(5) Both PLus and Sharp introduced 1280x720 front DLP projectors at Winter CES this past January, for fall delivery.


(6) Sony, Sanyo, and Toshiba are all now selling 16x9 front LCD projectors with a native resolution of 1280x768 or 1366x768 pixels - again, compatible with 720p.


All of the devices identified have a horizontal scan rate of 44.9 kHz, which is required for 720p display. 33.8 is used for 1080i. Many manufacturers simply support 1080i because it makes for a cheaper TV set - the oscillator runs at a lower speed and the bandwidth doesn't have to be as wide.


KC
 

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Since future technologies (plasma, DLP, LCD) are generally

supporting some sort of 720p today, I hope they continue

to support 720p (and improve it, in the case of plasma)

as prices come down in the future.


I also hope Panasonic continues to support 720p

in larger RPTVs, just like they do today. Hopefully

others manufacturers will join Panasonic in doing this

at the Panasonic 720p price point, although maybe not

this year.
 

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I think that most 720p support in RPTVs will just be in those based on DLP chips that happen to be 720p. It won't be becuase those companies have any great belief in or preference for 720p, it's just what the chips they'll be using supports. When the correct source equipment you'll be able to watch native 720p HD, what there is of it, since I don't think they'll actively do anything to *prevent* you from doing that, since that would be stupid. But mostly you'll be watching 1080i up/down converted (according to your point of view) to 720p.


Of course it'll be great for folks with HTPCs, who'll feed them with 720p upconverted DVDs, and they'll look great (barring the issues that DLPs have, but let's not have that 100 response argument here :)



------------------

Dean Roddey

The CIDLib C++ Frameworks
[email protected]
www.charmedquark.com
 

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Don't forget the Panasonic DT-M3050W multiformat 16:9

30 inch broadcast monitor.


Three HD componet/RGB inputs. Direct remote access to all inputs.

Scans at native 15.7 kHz for NTSC sources all the way to 44.9 kHz for native 720p. No internal line doubling of NTSC sources, thus superior NTSC performance compared to most HD monitors.

Direct access to all service adjustments from the remote without obscure service codes.

Much better electronic innards, much smaller footprint, and 50 lbs lighter than the Princeton AF3.0 HD. Better picture too.

Broadcast quality HD for a bargain $4300 list.
 
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