AVS Forum banner

5461 - 5480 of 10670 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,829 Posts
vinyl



All in the Name of Love is a studio album by the R&B band Atlantic Starr, released in 1987.

In 1977, the band moved from New York to Westwood, California and performed on the nightclub scene under the name "Newban," which they agreed to change at the request of A&M Records executive Herb Alpert when they were signed. Having already agreed to keep the Starr part of an early idea for a new band name, the members decided to add the word Atlantic, because of their East Coast roots.

In 1987, the band solidified their pop success by scoring a #1 pop (and R&B) hit with "Always", a love ballad off their album All in the Name of Love. Following this success, Barbara Weathers left for a solo career.

The album rose to Number 4 and 18 on the R&B and Billboard 200 charts, certified Platinum by the RIAA.

AllMusic Review:
While the timeless radio ballad "Always" is the centerpiece of this album (not to mention a few of the more weepy wedding receptions out there), Atlantic Starr's 1987 effort, All in the Name of Love, does feature some solid additional work from the longstanding urban contemporary group. The uplifting "Let the Sun In" features the smooth lead vocals of David Lewis and Wayne Lewis, and percolates with lightly funky bass and inspired percussion. Meanwhile, "You Belong With Me" takes a darker lyrical turn, but is still a solid slice of sanitized, late-'80s urban radio groove. The album could have used more vocals from the talented Barbara Weathers, but it's still a well-appointed record that offers fans much more than just the Whitney-flavored single.​
Autographed :cool:
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,829 Posts
Victrola 78 rpm



For You / Casa Loma Stomp is a 10" 78-RPM shellac record by Glen Gray, released in 1937.

Glenn Gray Knoblauch (June 7, 1900 – August 23, 1963), known professionally as Glen Gray, was a jazz saxophonist and leader of the Casa Loma Orchestra.

Born in Illinois, his father was a saloon keeper and railroad worker who died when Glen was two years of age. Gray attended the American Conservatory of Music in 1921 but left during his first year to go to Peoria, Illinois, to play with George Haschert's orchestra.

AllMusic biography:
He headed for Detroit, where, with his ability on the alto sax, he became part of Jean Goldkette's stable of artists. In the late '20s, Goldkette was the big noise in the city's band music community, running a bunch of orchestras using his name, the ranks of which included Bix Beiderbecke, Joe Venuti, Eddie Lang, Frankie Trumbauer, Jimmy Dorsey, Tommy Dorsey, and Pee Wee Russell.

Knoblauch wasn't in the same league with any of these as a player, but he absorbed a lot of the music around him and saw what went into making a good, memorable band. Fate took a hand when he and his good friend, trombonist Pee Wee Hunt, were hired as part of a septet called Goldkette's Orange Blossoms, under trumpet man Hank Biagini, that was booked to play a new Toronto hotel called the Casa Loma. They played an eight-month gig there but the place was so huge (it's been described as a castle) that even the band's popularity couldn't pull in enough people to keep it from closing.

He wasn't much of a bandleader, barely able to look like he was keeping time; and as a musician -- specifically a reedman -- he was adequate, but no threat to Benny Goodman, Artie Shaw, or Jimmy Dorsey. And yet, Gray and the band he led, called the Casa Loma Orchestra, ran with the best of them.

They got an extended engagement at the Roseland Ballroom in New York City. They did well enough to get signed up by OKeh Records. All of this took place in the summer and early fall of 1929, just as the American economy was about to dive into the Great Depression. Indeed, among the songs that Gray and company recorded at their first session -- which took place on the day of the stock market crash in October of 1929 -- was, rather ironically, "Happy Days Are Here Again."

As a dance band they found that their exacting ensemble work had an audience that would pay to hear them, even in the coming hard times, as it turned out. The second edge they had came in their organization -- starting in early 1930, the Casa Loma Orchestra became a corporation, with each member owning an equal share and with Gray acting as president. But as most bands needed a name in front of them -- or, at least, one person's name with whom the public could identify -- Gray's was the logical one, even though he preferred sitting in the sax section, didn't sing, and scarcely knew how to keep time. In fact, Gray was an amazingly anonymous musical presence within the band -- even their charts were the work of someone else, guitarist Gene Gifford, who pioneered the field of detailed full-band arrangements in jazz. But his name -- shortened to Glen Gray -- was resonant, and he lent it to that role in the enterprise.

In the years before Benny Goodman came to define swing music, Gray and his orchestra were among the top swing outfits in the country, and even after the ascent of Goodman, Tommy Dorsey, Jimmy Dorsey, Glenn Miller, Harry James, and others, Gray still had the allegiance of a major part of the listening public, and the members of his group could hold their heads up in any of that company. And Gray's reputation lasted well past the big-band era, so that in the late '50s he was still fulfilling a lingering demand for the Casa Loma Orchestra's work.​

In 1963, Gray died in Plymouth, Massachusetts of lymphoma, aged 63.
Autographed by Glen Gray and vocalist Kenny Sargent. :cool:
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,848 Posts
Led Zeppelin: Houses Of The Holy
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,829 Posts
Victrola 78 rpm



Nutty Nursery Rhymes / Memories of You is a 10" 78-RPM shellac record by Glen Gray and the Casa Loma Orchestra with vocalist Pee Wee Hunt, released in 1938.

AllMusic biography:
In 1948, trombonist Pee Wee Hunt and his band were fooling around at a Capitol recording session. They performed a satirical version of "Twelfth Street Rag" that found them playing like amateur Dixielanders and renegades of 1921-style jazz. The Capitol executives were delighted, the performance was released, and to everyone's surprise, it became a major hit!

Prior to that spontaneous performance, Hunt had been best-known for his long period with the Casa Loma Orchestra. His father had been a violinist and his mother a guitarist, so music was a natural part of his life. Hunt was actually a banjoist originally; he started playing when he was 17. Soon he was doubling on trombone and playing in local bands on both instruments before eventually dropping the banjo. He was with Jean Goldkette's Orchestra for a period in Kansas City (1927-1928) and then in 1929 became one of the founders of the Casa Loma Orchestra, which would eventually be taken over by Glen Gray.

Hunt had occasional trombone solos and was probably most notable for his good-humored (and sometimes comedic) vocals. He remained with the Casa Loma Orchestra for 14 years until departing in May 1943 to settle in Los Angeles. Hunt was a disc jockey for a time in Hollywood, served with the U.S. Merchant Marine, and in 1946, formed his own Dixieland group. The success of "Twelfth Street Rag" resulted in the trombonist recording many more dates for Capitol (up until 1962) although no further hits resulted. Pee Wee Hunt remained active into the '70s.​
Autographed by vocalist Pee Wee Hunt. The B side (Memories of You) is autographed by Glen Gray. :cool:
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,829 Posts
vinyl



We Just Couldn't Say Goodbye is an album by Maxine Sullivan, released in 1978.

AllMusic Review:
Sullivan sounds exuberant while being inspired by the great cornetist Ernie Carson, Spencer Clark on baritone, pianist Art Hodes, bassist Johnny Haynes and drummer Martin. Carson takes many heated solos; Hodes is often rollicking, and Sullivan's voice is heard throughout in prime form -- she even takes a valve trombone solo on one song. Highlights include definitive versions of "We Just Couldn't say Goodbye," "Someday Sweetheart," "That Old Feeling" and "Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea." Highly recommended.​

Maxine Sullivan (May 13, 1911 – April 7, 1987), born Marietta Williams in Homestead, Pennsylvania, was an American jazz vocalist and performer. Throughout her career, Sullivan also appeared as a performer on film as well as on stage. A precursor to better-known later vocalists such as Ella Fitzgerald and Sarah Vaughan, Maxine Sullivan is considered one of the best jazz vocalists of the 1930s. As a vocalist, Maxine Sullivan was active for half a century, from the mid-1930s to just before her death in 1987. Singer Peggy Lee named Sullivan as a key influence.

AllMusic biography:
A subtle and lightly swinging jazz singer, Maxine Sullivan's delivery was very likable, and she did justice to all of the lyrics she sang during her long career. After moving to New York, Sullivan sang during intermissions at the Onyx Club and was discovered by pianist Claude Thornhill. Thornhill recorded her with a sympathetic septet singing a couple of standards and two Scottish folk songs performed in swinging fashion -- "Annie Laurie" and "Loch Lomond." The latter became a big hit and Sullivan's signature song for the rest of her career.

Future sessions found her singing vintage folk tunes such as "Darling Nellie Gray," "I Dream of Jeanie," "Drink to Me Only with Thine Eyes" and "If I Had a Ribbon Bow." Even if lightning did not strike twice, she was now a popular attraction. She appeared briefly in the movie Going Places opposite Louis Armstrong and in the Broadway show Swingin' the Dream. From 1940-1942, Sullivan often sang with her husband, bassist John Kirby's Sextet, a perfect outlet for her cool sound.

She starred for two years on a radio series, Flow Gently Sweet Rhythm; she had a reasonably successful solo career, and then in the mid-'50s (similar to Alberta Hunter) became a trained nurse.

In 1968, the singer began making a comeback, performing at festivals and even playing a little bit of valve trombone and flügelhorn. Now married to pianist Cliff Jackson, Sullivan (whose style and appealing voice were unchanged from earlier years) sometimes appeared with the World's Greatest Jazz Band, and she recorded frequently. During her later period, she often sang with mainstream jazz groups, including Scott Hamilton's. Quite fittingly, the last song that she ever recorded in concert was the same as her first record, "Loch Lomond."​
Autographed. :cool:

 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,848 Posts
@ Rodrigues Brazil....Please tell me you have the live concert DVD/Blu-Ray of "The Song Remains The Same". If not, get it.:D
Are you referring to the Live at MSG from 1973 or the Movie? Or something else?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,843 Posts
Emerson, Lake & Palmer - Tarkus - Vinyl

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,843 Posts
The Beach Boys - Endless Summer - Vinyl

 
5461 - 5480 of 10670 Posts
Top