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Daughters-s/t
March 2010

File under: Noise Rock, No Wave
 

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Noya Rao - The British Music Embassy Sessions, MP4 (MQA). I very much enjoyed this set. Soul/Jazz/Funk played largely with electronic instruments, except for the drum kit. Really liked the singers voice.

https://mqa-live.s3.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/videos/artists/Noya_Rao_Live.mqa.mp4

Taken from sessions performed by British musicians who were scheduled, but not able to attend the SXSW festival as it was cancelled. These were "MQA Live" streamed on 18 March (I'm not sure if that was to the world in general of just to a venue in Austin, didn't read about it until after the event). I'm assuming that there will be more following this one, the implication was there would be videos for a few bands available before long.
The video can be downloaded (right click on the video, choose Save Video), which I did. I don't have any MQA gear or player. My CX-UHD wouldn't play the audio, but would the video off a hard drive via USB. JRiver played it just fine, though, and identified the audio as 48/24 FLAC. Audio seemed a bit better via JRiver (WASAPI over HDMI) than streamed, bass tighter, overall a little more defined. Only streamed a little to compare, did sound quite good but kept pausing every few minutes. Windows 10's Film&TV player also played it fine.
The sound is quite good for live off the floor (no audience). Definitely has a live in the club sound, though. Snare humming from the bass, that kind of thing.
Will be looking for more of this band which I had never heard of, apparently have an EP and LP. In the meantime, I've already watched/listed to this twice and see that happening a few more times over the next little while.
Morgan
 

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Cecil Taylor, John Coltrane - Hard Driving Jazz
 

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A Rusty Old Halo is an album by Hoyt Axton, released in 1979.

The song "A Rusty Old Halo" was first released by Mahalia Jackson in 1954.


I know a man as rich as a king
Still he just won't give his neighbors a thing
His day will come, I'll make a bet
He'll get to heaven and here's what he'll get
A rusty old halo, skinny white cloud, second hand wings full of patches
A rusty old halo, skinny white cloud, robe that's so wooly and it scratches​

Jeff "Skunk" Baxter - guitar (age 71; Steely Dan and The Doobie Brothers)
Paul Butterfield - harmonica (died 1987)
Garth Hudson - accordion (age 82; organist, keyboardist and saxophonist for The Band)

Hoyt Wayne Axton (March 25, 1938 – October 26, 1999) was an American folk music singer-songwriter, guitarist, and a film and television actor. He became prominent in the early 1960s, establishing himself on the West Coast as a folk singer with an earthy style and powerful voice. As he matured, some of his songwriting became well known throughout the world. Among them were "Joy to the World", "The Pusher", "No No Song", "Greenback Dollar", "Della and the Dealer", and "Never Been to Spain".

His mother, Mae Boren Axton, a songwriter, co-wrote the classic rock 'n' roll song "Heartbreak Hotel", which became a major hit for Elvis Presley. Some of Hoyt's own songs were also later recorded by Presley.

His most lasting contributions were his songs made famous by others: "Joy to the World" and "Never Been to Spain" (Three Dog Night); "Greenback Dollar" (Kingston Trio); "The Pusher" and "Snowblind Friend" (Steppenwolf); "No-No Song" (Ringo Starr); and an array of others, covered by singers such as Joan Baez, Arlo Guthrie, BJ Thomas, John Denver, Waylon Jennings, Jonathan Edwards, Glen Campbell and Anne Murray.

Axton also sang a couple of duets with Linda Ronstadt, including "Lion in Winter" and "When the Morning Comes" (a top 40 country hit). His composition "Joy to the World", as performed by Three Dog Night, was the top hit of 1971. He named his record label Jeremiah after the bullfrog mentioned in the song.
"Rusty Old Halo" is G C D7 if you happen to strum along on the uke ;)

Autographed. :cool:
 

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Eyes That See in the Dark is the 15th studio album by Kenny Rogers, released in 1983.

Eyes That See in the Dark marks Barry Gibb's third production project of the 1980s outside of the Bee Gees. Gibb wrote most of the songs that were more reminiscent of Rogers' days with the First Edition.

Just after Barry Gibb contributed producing Dionne Warwick's Heartbreaker album, he and Rogers met later in the year and it was then that Rogers asked about some songs, and one of those songs was the title track. Gibb recorded demos for Rogers while working with the Bee Gees for the 1983 film Staying Alive. Rogers started to record this album in May the same year.

The producers at the vocal sessions were surprised by Rogers' laid-back approach. He had kept the song demos in his possession for a period of time, but still needed to read lyric sheets while singing. He also, in production executive Albhy Galuten's opinion, was just copying Barry's vocals instead of making the songs his own, a comment for which Galuten was banished from the rest of the sessions. Kenny recalled it differently, that the producers urged him to sing them like Barry.

"Islands in the Stream" was originally not a duet and Rogers was not happy with the recording. Only after Dolly Parton was brought in and recorded the song did it take off. "Islands in the Stream" is a song written by the Bee Gees, named after the Ernest Hemingway novel. It was originally written for Marvin Gaye in an R&B style. In 2005, the song topped CMT's poll of the best country duets of all time.

The Gatlin Brothers contributed background vocals on "Buried Treasure" (a top 3 country hit) and "Evening Star", while the three members of the Bee Gees: Barry, Robin & Maurice Gibb sang background on "Living with You".

AllMusic Review:
This is a masterpiece of a pop recording from Kenny Rogers. It is clear that Barry Gibb, Maurice Gibb, and co-producers Karl Richardson and Albhy Galuten remembered Rogers' pop roots with the First Edition and, despite the country twang of "Buried Treasure," the slick musicianship and modulation are not your typical country & western.

There are four tracks written by Barry and Maurice and five more by Barry, Maurice, and brother Robin Gibb, including the stunning number one hit from September 1983, "Islands in the Stream." It hit number one across the board on adult contemporary, country, and the Top 40, and deservedly so -- the melody is infectious, impeccable, and perfectly recorded. Keep in mind this was five years after they created Frankie Valli's biggest-selling solo record, "Grease" -- the pairing of Dolly Parton with Rogers makes for an amazing vocal sound to carry the melody.

"Living With You" features the Bee Gees -- it is Rogers fronting the Bee Gees, and why they didn't seek out more artists, new as well as established, to work their magic on is a pity. It's a lush setting for the country superstar, and as Barbara Streisand and Dionne Warwick enjoyed success thanks to this creative team, Eyes That See in the Dark stands as an important piece of the Rogers catalog and a really timeless recording.

By the end of 1984 Rogers would post his 27th Top 40 hit, ending a string started 16 years earlier in 1968. Eyes That See in the Dark is not the definitive Kenny Rogers album but, outside of greatest-hits packages, it is absolutely one of his most consistent and one of his best.​
Autographed. :cool:
 

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How Cruel is a 12-inch one-sided EP by British singer-songwriter Joan Armatrading, released in 1979.

The title track had previously appeared on Armatrading's live album Steppin' Out, which was not released in the US. The EP was released in the US and elsewhere, but not in the UK. It was nominated for the Grammy Award for Best Female Rock Vocal Performance at the 23rd Annual Grammy Awards in 1981.

AllMusic Review:
How Cruel is a four-song, one-sided, 12-inch EP released, according to the blurb on the cover, because the tunes were "so good they couldn't wait for an album!!!" The title track had already appeared, albeit not in the U.S., on the live Steppin' Out album. In fact, the songs are good, although the decision to release them probably had more to do with having something in the marketplace between the autumn 1978 release of To the Limit and the spring 1980 release of Me Myself, I.

The best track is "How Cruel," a complaint about her career ("I had somebody say once I was way too black/And someone answers she's not black enough for me") with a terrific sax solo by Lon Price, although "He Wants Her," with a lazy reggae beat, also impresses.​

Joan Armatrading was born in 1950 in Basseterre on the Caribbean island of Saint Kitts as the third of six children. When she was three years old, her parents moved with their two eldest boys to Birmingham, England, while Joan was sent to live with her grandmother on the Caribbean island of Antigua. At the age of seven, she joined her parents in a slum district of Birmingham.

Her father had played in a band in his youth, later forbidding his children from touching his guitar. At about the age of 14, Armatrading began writing songs by setting her own limericks to music on a piano that her mother had purchased as "a piece of furniture". Shortly thereafter, her mother bought her a £3 guitar from a pawn shop in exchange for two prams, and the younger Armatrading began teaching herself the instrument. She left school at the age of 15 to support her family, and her first job was at an engineering tool manufacturer. She lost the job after taking her guitar to work and playing it during tea-breaks.

Armatrading was the musical guest for Season 2, episode 21 of NBC's Saturday Night Live in 1977. Armatrading performed as a cameo vocalist for the song "Don't Lose Your Head" on the 1986 Queen album A Kind of Magic.

In a recording career spanning 46 years, Armatrading has released 19 studio albums, as well as several live albums and compilations.
Autographed. :cool:
 

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The Many Moods of Wanda Jackson is an album by Wanda Jackson, released in 1969.

Wanda Jackson (age 82) is a retired American singer, songwriter, pianist and guitarist who had success in the mid-1950s and 1960s as one of the first popular female rockabilly singers, and a pioneering rock-and-roll artist. She is known to many as the "Queen of Rockabilly".

She was discovered by Hank Thompson in 1954, who heard her singing on a local radio station in Oklahoma City. Thompson invited her to perform with his band, the Brazos Valley Boys. She recorded a few songs on their label, Capitol Records, including "You Can't Have My Love", a duet with Thompson's bandleader, Billy Gray. The song was released as a single in 1954 and reached number 8. Wanda asked Capitol to sign her but was turned down by producer Ken Nelson, who told her, "Girls don't sell records." She signed with Decca Records instead.

After graduating from high school, Jackson began to tour with her father as manager and chaperon. She often shared the bill with Elvis Presley, who encouraged her to sing rockabilly. She briefly dated Presley while touring. She was a cast member of ABC-TV's Ozark Jubilee in Springfield, Missouri, from 1955 to 1960. In 1956 she signed with Capitol, recording a number of singles mixing country with rock and roll.

Jackson's stage outfits in these years were often designed by her mother. Unlike the traditional clothing worn by female country music singers of the time, she wore fringed dresses, high heels and long earrings. She has claimed she was the first woman to put "glamour into country music."

Jackson ranked number 35 on CMT's "The 40 Greatest Women of Country Music".

In 2009, she teamed up with Jack White to record The Party Ain't Over. The album also broke Mae West's long-standing record for being the oldest female vocalist to make the chart with her 1966 album Way Out West. Jackson was 73, being a year older than West.
Autographed. :cool:

 

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The Kennedy Wit is an album narrated by David Brinkley, releaseed in 1964.

To observe the first anniversary of the assassination of President Kennedy, RCA Victor released “The Kennedy Wit,” an album which captures the humor displayed by the late President during the 1960 campaign and during his abbreviated term in office. Material was selected by the best-selling book of the same title by Bill Adler.

Introduction is by Adlai Stevenson, and David Brinkley does the narration.

The album was nominated for Best Documentary, Spoken Word, or Drama Recording (other than Comedy) at the 7th Annual Grammy Awards in 1964.

David Brinkley (July 10, 1920 – June 11, 2003) was an American newscaster for NBC and ABC in a career lasting from 1943 to 1997. From 1956 through 1970, he co-anchored NBC's top-rated nightly news program, The Huntley–Brinkley Report, with Chet Huntley and thereafter appeared as co-anchor or commentator on its successor, NBC Nightly News, through the 1970s. In the 1980s and 1990s, Brinkley was host of the popular Sunday This Week with David Brinkley program and a top commentator on election-night coverage for ABC News. Over the course of his career, Brinkley received ten Emmy Awards, three George Foster Peabody Awards.

In 1992, President George H. W. Bush awarded him the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor.

Brinkley died in 2003 at his home in Houston from complications of a fall suffered at his vacation home in Jackson Hole, Wyoming.
Autographed by David Brinkley. :cool:
 

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