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Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 - 1827) Chamber.




History:

"How Beethoven went from Napoleon’s biggest fan to his worst critic"

Beethoven’s innovative compositions took music to new heights. His symphonies told entire stories without words, unfurling emotions and painting pictures that immersed listeners like nothing before it. Beethoven dominated the musical world the same way Napoleon reigned over the military and political spheres. These two men never met, but a shared critical moment in the early 19th century revealed a stark contrast between these two icons.
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history/magazine/2019/03-04/napoleon-inspiration-beethoven-third-symphony/
 

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Forest Light; Storm Warning.




History/Obituary:

"Alan Dargin (1967 - 2008): Inventor of rock'n'roll didgeridoo"

His touring-career highlights included performing to more than 200,000 at the 1994 Bastille Day festivities in France, and sharing a stage with Jimmy Page and Robert Plant in 1995. He encouraged non-Aboriginals to play the yirdaki as long as they respected its cultural significance; among his many pupils was Wallis Buchanan, who played it on the first four albums by the British group Jamiroquai.
https://www.independent.co.uk/news/obituaries/alan-dargin-inventor-of-rocknroll-didgeridoo-800236.html
 

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Sublime

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Abandoned Luncheonette is the second studio album by the American pop rock duo Hall & Oates, released in 1973.

After their first album, Whole Oats, failed to make an impact, the duo moved from Philadelphia to New York and started recording Abandoned Luncheonette, which became the first album they recorded as New Yorkers. Their producer was still Arif Mardin but they wanted to get away from the commercial standards to establish the parameters of their musical identity.

John Oates said, "Recording that album was where we learned how songs become records. Our producer, the legendary Arif Mardin carefully crafted each song, every bit of nuance, bringing in the perfect players for the right moments. And it all worked together as one beautiful musical tapestry." "We opened for amazing people — Cheech & Chong, David Bowie, Stevie Wonder. So we had all these experiences for the first time behind a record we were really proud of, and people were digging.”

After "She's Gone" was re-released in 1976 and became a hit, the album peaked at #33 on the Billboard 200, but by that time the duo had left Atlantic Records and moved to RCA Records, where they would become one of the biggest acts of the 1980s.

Another song from the album, "Las Vegas Turnaround (The Stewardess Song)", written by Oates, draws its inspiration from Hall's girlfriend and future songwriting collaborator Sara Allen, who also inspired the later "Sara Smile".

The diner on the album cover was formerly the Rosedale Diner, located in Pottstown, Pennsylvania. When it went out of business, its structure was dumped in a small wooded area located in Kenilworth, PA. The group arranged permission to take photos of the old restaurant but they thought that the session was incomplete without getting inside. And so they snuck in and photographed Barbara Wilson started shooting, carefully tip-toeing around broken glass and tile. The guys squeezed into a booth and the rest is album cover history. The interior was used as the back cover. The owner began screaming at them when he realized where they were, and they quickly left.

Wilson shot the black-and-white 35mm images on an old Nikon SLR and then began a silkscreen process to create the surreal color imagery, using a different stencil for each hue and then hand-coloring the final piece. It was the only album cover Wilson ever did.

Stephen Thomas Erlewine, from Allmusic, gave the album five stars.

Hall & Oates were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2014.
Autographed by Daryl Hall. :cool:

 

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The Resurrection of Pigboy Crabshaw is the third album by The Butterfield Blues Band, released in 1967.

Its name refers to Elvin Bishop, whose role shifted to lead guitarist after Mike Bloomfield departed to form Electric Flag. The album marked a slight shift in the band's sound towards R&B and was the first Butterfield record to feature a horn section, which included alto saxophone player David Sanborn.

AllMusic Review:
The 1968 edition of the Paul Butterfield Blues Band featured a larger ensemble with a horn section, allowing for a jazzier feeling while retaining its Chicago blues core. They also adopted the psychedelic flower power stance of the era, as evidenced by a few selections, the rather oblique title, and the stunning pastiche art work on the cover. Butterfield himself was really coming into his own playing harmonica and singing, while his band of keyboardist Mark Naftalin, guitarist Elvin Bishop, drummer Phil Wilson, electric bassist Bugsy Maugh, and the horns featuring young alto saxophonist David Sanborn was as cohesive a unit as you'd find in this time period.

Butterfield's most well-known song "One More Heartache" kicks off the album, a definitive blues-rock radio favorite with great harmonica and an infectious beat urged on by the top-notch horns. The band covers "Born Under a Bad Sign" at a time when Cream also did it. "Driftin' & Driftin'" is another well-known tune, and at over nine minutes stretches out with the horns cryin' and sighin', including a definitive solo from Sanborn over the choruses. There's the Otis Rush tune "Double Trouble," and "Drivin' Wheel" penned by Roosevelt Sykes; Butterfield wrote two tunes, including "Run Out of Time" and the somewhat psychedelic "Tollin' Bells," where Bishop's guitar and Naftalin's slow, ringing, resonant keyboard evokes a haunting feeling.

This is likely the single best Butterfield album of this time period and you'd be well served to pick this one up.​

Elvin Bishop (age 77) is an American blues and rock music singer, guitarist, bandleader, and songwriter. An original member of the Paul Butterfield Blues Band, he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of that group in 2015 and the Blues Hall of Fame in his own right in 2016.

Bishop's daughter and ex-wife were murdered in 2000. The culprits were the daughter's boyfriend Glenn Taylor Helzer, Helzer's brother Justin, and an accomplice. Both killers were sentenced to death for the murders; Justin Helzer, blind and partially paralyzed from an attempt on his own life while incarcerated, committed suicide in San Quentin prison.
Autographed by Elvin Bishop. :cool:
 

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Live from Austin is an album by Delbert McClinton, released in 1989.

The first live album from the King of Texas Roadhouses. Raw rockers, soul ballads, driving band. A best seller. "Breathtaking, hardcore roadhouse rhythm & blues" -- Rolling Stone

Augmented by three horns, the Texas singer/harpist and his band pound out their late-1980s show, which includes several unctuous originals and McClinton's 1980 pop hit "Givin' It Up for Your Love." His shellacked smooth-and-easy combination of country and western, R&B, blues, and soul gives no sign of his roadhouse tutelage under Sonny Boy Williamson and Howlin' Wolf way back when.

Delbert McClinton (age 79) is an American blues rock and electric blues singer-songwriter, guitarist, harmonica player, and pianist. On a tour with Channel in the United Kingdom, McClinton instructed John Lennon on the finer points of blues harmonica playing. Emmylou Harris had a number 1 hit in 1978 with her recording of McClinton's composition "Two More Bottles of Wine," and a cover version of his "B Movie Boxcar Blues" was on the first album by the Blues Brothers. His highest charting pop hit was 1980's "Giving It Up for Your Love".

After an inactive period during much of the 1980s, McClinton made a return in 1989 with the Grammy-nominated album Live from Austin, recorded during an appearance on the television program Austin City Limits. In 1991 he won a Grammy Award for a duet with Bonnie Raitt, "Good Man, Good Woman", and reached number 4 on the Country chart with "Tell Me About It", a duet with Tanya Tucker.

Four of his albums have been number 1 on the Blues chart.
Autographed. :cool:
 

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