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L.V. Beethoven (1770-1827)

Beethoven: Works for Guitar & Piano
Débora Halász, piano
Franz Halász, guitar
July 2020

File under: Chamber music, Romantic
 

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Whiskey is the fourth album by The Charlie Daniels Band, released in 1977, originally released as "Way Down Yonder" in 1974.

Charles Edward Daniels ((October 28, 1936 – July 6, 2020) was an American singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist known for his contributions to Southern rock, country, and bluegrass music. Daniels had been active as a singer and musician since the 1950s. He worked as a Nashville session musician, including playing guitar and electric bass on three Bob Dylan albums during 1969 and 1970, and on recordings by Leonard Cohen. Daniels recorded his first solo album, Charlie Daniels, in 1971.

In the early 70s, Daniels played fiddle on many of the Marshall Tucker Band's early albums: "A New Life", "Where We All Belong", "Searchin' For a Rainbow", "Long Hard Ride" and "Carolina Dreams". Daniels can be heard on the live portion of the "Where We All Belong" album.

In 1975, he had a hit as leader of the Charlie Daniels Band with the Southern rock self-identification anthem "The South's Gonna Do It Again". "Long Haired Country Boy" was a minor hit in that year. Daniels played fiddle on Hank Williams, Jr.'s 1975 album Hank Williams, Jr. and Friends.

Daniels won the Grammy Award for Best Country Vocal Performance in 1979 for "The Devil Went Down to Georgia".

He was inducted into the Grand Ole Opry in 2008, the Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum in 2009, and the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2016.
Autographed. :cool:

RIP, Charlie.

https://www.tennessean.com/story/entertainment/music/2020/07/06/charlie-daniels-country-music-dies/5384087002/
Charlie Daniels, a member of the Country Music Hall of Fame best known for "The Devil Went Down to Georgia," died Monday morning after suffering a hemorrhagic stroke. He was 83.

Daniels' death was confirmed by his publicist, Don Murry Grubbs. He is survived by his wife, Hazel, and son Charlie Daniels Jr.

By the time the Charlie Daniels Band topped the charts with “Devil” in 1979, the instrumentalist, singer and songwriter had long established a remarkable, multifaceted career in Music City. As a session musician, he played on three of Bob Dylan’s albums — including the revolutionary “Nashville Skyline” — as well as recordings for Ringo Starr and Leonard Cohen.

In 1974, he launched the first “Volunteer Jam,” a regun all-star concert that has continued for nearly 50 years. Daniels joined the Grand Ole Opry in 2008, and was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2016.
 

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Doin' It Dylan is a tribute album by Charlie Daniels, released in 2014.

AllMusic Review:
Back when Charlie Daniels was a working musician and not a star, he played on three albums by Bob Dylan -- he played guitar and bass on the sessions that became Nashville Skyline, Self Portrait, and New Morning (which means he also shows up on the acclaimed 2013 archival release, Another Self Portrait (1969-1971)) -- so his decision to cut an album devoted to Dylan is not out of the blue.

What is surprising is that Off the Grid: Doin' It Dylan isn't one of Daniels' tossed-off latter-day albums, but rather a record where Charlie really digs in, savoring the interplay of his band as well as how the words feel in his mouth.

Daniels does indeed choose a few of Bob's densely written songs -- "Mr. Tambourine Man," "A Hard Rain's Gonna Fall," and "Just Like a Woman" are here, none of them seeming like easy fits on paper, but each carried with conviction by Charlie -- along with country-rockers that are sure bets: the rollicking ditty "Country Pie," "I'll Be Your Baby Tonight," and "Tangled Up in Blue," whose narrative gets trimmed down and sped up without losing its power. That impassioned reworking of "Tangled Up in Blue" -- which finds a counterpart in a nicely raucous back porch rendition of "Quinn the Eskimo" -- goes a long way toward explaining what's so joyous about Off the Grid.

Daniels enjoys not the words of Dylan so much as the melodies and music, using these songs not as ruminative reflection but full-bore celebration. Even the ballads -- and there are a few here -- are played for keeps and if that music-first emphasis is a relative rarity among Dylan tributes, it's also true that it's been a long time since Daniels has sounded as engaged on a record as he is here.​
Autographed. :cool:
 

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R.I.P Charlie Daniels
 

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Saddle Tramp is the seventh studio album by The Charlie Daniels Band, released in 1976.

Toy Caldwell (lead guitarist, main songwriter and a founding member of The Marshall Tucker Band) plays steel guitar on the last track, "Sweetwater, Texas".

AllMusic Review:
Around the time the Charlie Daniels Band recorded the music that became 1976's Saddle Tramp, the group was experiencing its first wave of success, as both Fire on the Mountain and Nightrider found an audience, and the group became known for their live performances, particularly through Daniels' Volunteer Jams concerts.

Saddle Tramp rode this momentum into the country Top Ten and a gold album -- all without a Top Ten country single, it should be noted. That's because the Charlie Daniels Band turned into the country equivalent of a radio-oriented rock band, where singles were less important than a unified whole of an album, which sought to replicate the feel of live performances. Since the CDB was a country band, that meant that they had less of a theme to tie together their records -- not even to the extent that the Grateful Dead did on Workingman's Dead and American Beauty, two records whose influence is felt on Saddle Tramp.

Instead, the band cut seven songs, sometimes stretching out and jamming for a long, long time, other times focusing that energy into a three- or four-minute song. So, Saddle Tramp becomes about the texture and feel of the performances more than the songs, which makes it a quintessential jam record, complete with the flaw of putting a ten-minute title track as the second song, thereby killing any forward momentum the album had. It's a good jam, and it shows that the CDB was a vigorous, muscular band capable of shifting styles and tones easily and gracefully; it would have worked better at the end of the album, where it would have summarized the rest of the record and how it touches on cowboy music, bluegrass, blues, hillbilly, and swinging jazz in equal measure. Arriving so early in the record signals that this is a jam record for jam fans, and on that level, it works very well, since it does showcase the band at a near-peak of its talents.

But, like many other jam records, Saddle Tramp winds up not being about the songs (which, apart from the single "Wichita Jail," aren't particularly memorable), but being about the feel of the music and the sound of the band, which can make for good listening, provided that's what you're looking to hear.​
Autographed. :cool:
 

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Will The Circle Be Unbroken. 1972 pressing. Triple LP. Made for record changers. First record sides 1 and 6. Second record 2 and 5. Third record 3 and 4. A little fact Bill Monroe was invited to play on the album but he refused because he wouldn't play w/any long haired hippies.:D
Bill eventually got cool. Love his mandolin. R.I.P.

https://youtu.be/iOigq2oR1Kk?t=33
 
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Charlie Daniels

Honey In The Rock
 

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