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Well we can't see the frequency range.... on your graph.....
Assuming these are typical sub ranges it still depends on the space!
Free air (little to no boundaries) to a small enclosed space matters a great deal. Even ask a human bassist (electric or otherwise). Whom may even play a low "b" bass or lower ;)
Then the other stuff shaking on the walls or THE walls will typically come to play given a proper! Enough of energy ;)
I keep adding more speaker bass and it still is not enough. My cheap bass shakers add SO much though! Can't recommend them enough. After a certain enough am9unt of woofer bass flopping around the return on investment is much lower than physical connection to your caboose! Maybe Fter a single ported 18 per 1,000 s.q.ft. a bass shaker will perform the same? Sacrilege I know!
 

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I'm guess both are ported boxes. One tuned to 22~Hz and the other 16 or 17. I like deep bass extension so I would go for the lower tuned box. That might be less suitable for others though. From looking solely at that I don't think we can say which line is preferable. What are your goals?
 

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like more is better indicates, it depends on what you are trying to accomplish. check out the "max spl" tab. that will show how the lower tune sacrifices a little spl above tuning relative to the higher tuned cab. whether that is a good tradeoff or not depends on your application.
 

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why...

The white line is 20hz and up, Music is 30ish hz and up. If you are only building a sub or 2 you will appreciate the extra 4db.

The red line at 16hz, in a small room (15ft max dimension) you will get good room gain by the time the response starts to roll off. That will flatten it out. Or if using multiples the extension would be useful and output isn't an issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It depends on your room. Depending on the room gain of your room either one could be better than the other and it's impossible for us to tell you.
why...

The white line is 20hz and up, Music is 30ish hz and up. If you are only building a sub or 2 you will appreciate the extra 4db.

The red line at 16hz, in a small room (15ft max dimension) you will get good room gain by the time the response starts to roll off. That will flatten it out. Or if using multiples the extension would be useful and output isn't an issue.
like more is better indicates, it depends on what you are trying to accomplish. check out the "max spl" tab. that will show how the lower tune sacrifices a little spl above tuning relative to the higher tuned cab. whether that is a good tradeoff or not depends on your application.
White line for 1 or 2 speakers or with music.

Red line with 4-16 speakers or in a tiny room.
I'm guess both are ported boxes. One tuned to 22~Hz and the other 16 or 17. I like deep bass extension so I would go for the lower tuned box. That might be less suitable for others though. From looking solely at that I don't think we can say which line is preferable. What are your goals?
Well we can't see the frequency range.... on your graph.....
Assuming these are typical sub ranges it still depends on the space!
Free air (little to no boundaries) to a small enclosed space matters a great deal. Even ask a human bassist (electric or otherwise). Whom may even play a low "b" bass or lower ;)
Then the other stuff shaking on the walls or THE walls will typically come to play given a proper! Enough of energy ;)
I keep adding more speaker bass and it still is not enough. My cheap bass shakers add SO much though! Can't recommend them enough. After a certain enough am9unt of woofer bass flopping around the return on investment is much lower than physical connection to your caboose! Maybe Fter a single ported 18 per 1,000 s.q.ft. a bass shaker will perform the same? Sacrilege I know!
It's for one of my Coworkers living room. Like 12x15. One is tuned to 20 hz. The other is tuned to 15 hz. Both are 5.5 ft3 gross volume.
 

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This line -worth all the effort
 

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It depends on your room. Depending on the room gain of your room either one could be better than the other and it's impossible for us to tell you.
+1. In most rooms the lower tuning will work better, as cabin gain will probably lift the response below 30Hz. That would make the lower tuned cab in-room response flatter while going lower.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
+1. In most rooms the lower tuning will work better, as cabin gain will probably lift the response below 30Hz. That would make the lower tuned cab in-room response flatter while going lower.
Ok. So does room gain increase as frequency drops or is the room gain the same level at all frequencies(sub frequencies)? Generally speaking.
 

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Ok. So does room gain increase as frequency drops or is the room gain the same level at all frequencies(sub frequencies)?
Room gain increases as frequency decreases. In a perfect scenario it does so at a rate of 12dB/octave, but in practice 6 to 9dB/octave is more likely.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Room gain increases as frequency decreases. In a perfect scenario it does so at a rate of 12dB/octave, but in practice 6 to 9dB/octave is more likely.
Ok, so when modelling. How far should I be willing to go to achieve a flat response(at what point on the frequency response number line should I aim for -12db/octave)
 

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Ok, so when modelling. How far should I be willing to go to achieve a flat response(at what point on the frequency response number line should I aim for -12db/octave)
It's impossible for us to tell you. You have to measure your room. Do you have a subwoofer and a SPL meter?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
It's impossible for us to tell you. You have to measure your room. Do you have a subwoofer and a SPL meter?
Yes.

Well..... it's not really and spl meter but more like a phone(note 3) but I think I can use it to measure differences in spl, although it probably wouldn't be good for a spl sweep
 

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Well..... it's not really and spl meter but more like a phone(note 3) but I think I can use it to measure differences in spl, although it probably wouldn't be good for a spl sweep
The idea is to take a sweep of the the sub up close (so removing any impact of the room from the measurement) and then take a sweep with the sub where you want to put your new one and the mic where you plan to listen from (MLP). Comparing the two sweeps you should be able to get a reasonable estimation of the amount of gain your room has.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
What frequency range and for how long should I do this sweep?
 

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What frequency range and for how long should I do this sweep?
Well, you have to be able to create a graph of SPL vs. frequency for both cases. If you can't do that you can't quantify your room gain. You could do it with test tones and a SPL meter, but that takes considerably longer than creating a quick measurement sweep using a measurement mic.
 
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