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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am getting ready to start building a HTPC and gathering parts.I will use it for primarily viewing DVD's on CRT FP.I am considering usig a CUSL2-C or

a TUSL2-C.I cannot find much difference between the two,reading as much as I have about them.Or is there another MB outhere that will be better for about the same price,which is about $65.00/75.00 on ebay.I will be using the Antec clone case ATX103B.



Jim
 

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I think the big difference between the CUSL2 and the TUSL2 is the TUSL2's support of Tualatin chips. I'd choose the TUSL2. It should be a great motherboard for your HTPC.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hey Jolenicz

I have heard mention of the Tualatin chip,just exactly what is it's main feature or what does it do extra?As you can see by my dumb questions I

am new to this HTPC concept.


Jim
 

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I've been poking around a bit in this area also. I recently upgraded my HTPC, and the CUSLC2 is what I got for that, and it works just fine. With a 1Ghz PIII, its a great deal. At the time the TU wasn't quite available, so I didn't wait. I'm not really sure what the Tualatin CPU would offer you over the PIII though right off hand.


BTW, if you sometimes wonder what all this Northbridge, Southbridge, Londonbridge crap is about, here is a good single page explanation with diagram from Tom's Hardware that 'splains it all very nicely and simply.
 

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Hi Jimkjr:


___If you are looking at the I815E chipset, the TUSL2 would be the proper choice for the Tualatin use capability already mentioned. The real kicker here is that the 1.0 – 1.3 GHz Tualatin based Celeron III’s as I like to call them are Tualatin cored PIII’s with a larger locked multiplier for just 100 MHz FSB operation. They only cost $60.00 - $80.00 vs. the 1.2 GHz Tualatin based PIII’s at ~ $140.00. Now the 100 to 133 MHz FSB slows these new Tualatin’s down by maybe 10% so the 1.3 Celeron III is ~ equivalent to a 1.13 – 1.2 GHz PIII but at a much lower cost. In some cases, you can use a 1.0A Tualatin based Celeron III and run it up to and beyond 1.33 GHz to not only surpass the 1.2 GHz PIII but save a bit of money as well. To summarize the two different based Tualatin’s against one another, you would not be able to feel the difference between a 1.3 GHz Celeron III on the 100 MHz FSB and a 1.2 GHz PIII on a 133 MHz FSB but you most certainly could see the difference in both memory and CPU performance benches.


___As far as the Tualatin itself is concerned; it has added some key items not included in a std. run of the mill .18-micron cored Coppermine (no copper interconnects, just the name) PIII of the past. The number 1 item is what is called data prefetch. It watches your data use patterns and pre-fetches from memory what it thinks you may use and places it in the extremely fast L2 cache on the CPU’s DIE. If it guessed wrong, you have no penalty but if it guesses right, you have > an ~ order magnitude less cycles for the same data to arrive at the CPU. The other main item to consider is that the Tualatin is built off a .13-micron core which can not only run at higher frequencies but at lower voltages as well. The .18-micron cored PIII’s are spec’ed up to just 1.0 GHz at 1.7-1.75 V whereas the .13-micron cored Tualatin based PIII’s have been spec’ed up to 1.4. The 1.4’s have not been or may never be released at just 1.45-1.475 V that I have seen but there are engineering samples floating around. A die shrink usually not only entails faster processing but cooler running cores. As an example, the Tualatin’s can be passively cooled up to ~ 700 MHz. whereas a std. Coppermine can be passively cooled up to ~ 475 MHz in my own experience if that helps you gauge the capability of one CPU vs. the other in terms of thermal output.


___After all is said and done, the TUSL2 with a Celeron III 1.0A is about the lowest latency/least expensive solution for an HTPC as well as one of the best given the much lower cooling requirements for both the CPU and the ability to use less expensive and lower power rated PS’s.


___Good Luck


___Wayne R. Gerdes

___Hunt Club Farms Landscaping Ltd.

___ [email protected]
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Wayne

Thank you for the lengthy explanation.Tho,now also I am a little confused as to what I should use as to a cpu.First of all is only the 1.0 and 1.3g

celeron Tualatin based and the 1.2g is not? And that a celeron say 1.3 would be just as good to use as a PIII 1.0g. Also what is meant by 1.0A?


Ji9m
 

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Hi Jimkjr:


___I will try to answer what I think you have asked?
  • 1 GHz “Celeron III’s†as I like to call them are labeled 1.0A’s
  • 1.3 GHz Celeron III’s are labeled 1.3A’s
  • 1.2 GHz PIII’s are labeled as 1.2 GHz PIII’s

___The way to distinguish between a Tualatin and a non-Tualatin in the Celeron lineup is the acronym FCPGA-2 vs FCPGA for the std.’s, 256 KB of on-DIE cache vs. 128 for the std.’s, and the Tualatin’s come in 1.0, 1.1, 1.2, and 1.3 GHz frequencies whereas the std. Celeron’s I’s and II’s come in the ranges from 266 MHz to 1.1 GHz. The 1.0A is the OC’er whereas the 1.3A is the smart choice for most.


___Good Luck


___Wayne R. Gerdes

___Hunt Club Farms Landscaping Ltd.

___ [email protected]
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hi Again Wayne


Yes,you answered exactly to what I was asking, Thank you,and I am sure there will be more!BTW,in my perusing of this site,I have read many of your comments,and have been enlightened with quite a few of them.


Thank You Again

Jim
 
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