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Is it correct to say that not all projectors are digital? I've heard it said that DLP projectors are digital in that they are dealing with 1s and 0s in terms of the micro mirror postions following the digital signal input while other technologies, such as LCD, and LCOS/DILA, are, in fact, analog...that the digital information is converted to analog before the light is processed through the various prisims and layers. If this is true, is "digital" light transmission faster than "analog" transmission? And if it is, how would this be manifested comparitively speaking? I have always understood CRT projectors to be analog, but it never ocurred to me that some digital projectors aren't "digital" from input to output. Is it a case of some projectors being more digital than others? Is any projector that displays pixels a "digital" projector? I would welcome the viewpoints of those more technical than I.
 

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How technical do you want to get? The general meaning for "digital projector" is one that displays discrete pixels with some sort of chip(s) that blocks light from a light source. Basically anything that's not a CRT or Film projector. Those are analog because they don't display discrete pixels.


As far as how digital any particular machine is, it really doesn't matter, that's about as far down on the list of important things as you can get. There's really nothing inherently better or worse about one way or another.


The latest JVC DiLA chips actually work a lot like DLPs AFAIK, in that they both use Pulse Width Modulation to create the various pixel values. But even then, Pulse Width Modulation isn't inherently "digital".
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete /forum/post/16962883


Is it correct to say that not all projectors are digital? I've heard it said that DLP projectors are digital in that they are dealing with 1s and 0s in terms of the micro mirror postions following the digital signal input while other technologies, such as LCD, and LCOS/DILA, are, in fact, analog...that the digital information is converted to analog before the light is processed through the various prisims and layers. If this is true, is "digital" light transmission faster than "analog" transmission? And if it is, how would this be manifested comparitively speaking? I have always understood CRT projectors to be analog, but it never ocurred to me that some digital projectors aren't "digital" from input to output. Is it a case of some projectors being more digital than others? Is any projector that displays pixels a "digital" projector? I would welcome the viewpoints of those more technical than I.

Why do you care?


I don't mean to be patronizing, but does it matter what portion of the chain uses analog voltages, versus digital signals and control? Are you of the bent that if it's digital, then it's somehow better in some way?

Quote:
If this is true, is "digital" light transmission faster than "analog" transmission?

What? This question makes no sense.


To answer your question, yes some projectors are "more digital" than others. But this doesn't have any bearing on the relative quality of the resulting image. It's like judging cars based on their paint color. Yes cars do come in varying colors of paint, but that doesn't really pertain to anything in terms of actual performance.


As far as considering what's digital and what's not, as mentioned above, unless it's a film projector or a CRT projector, it's digital. You know what else is digital? Morse code. So what? That makes morse code a modern state-of-the-art technology that we should pine after just because it comes saddled with the word digital? I'd take analog phone service any day of the week over morse code, even though that's dirty old ANALOG.


You know what is also analog and has been around for a century? Film. You know what looks better than any digital newfangled projector I've ever seen? Film.
 

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Also, addressing how this is manifested with regards to something like a DLP which is basically digital at the mirrors and is temporally combined essentially by your eyes, that means that given only the on and off states of the mirrors, a 1-chip DLP can only produce 1 of 3 colors at any one instance (given an RGB colorwheel). A 3-chip DLP can produce 1 of only 8 colors at any one instance. All other colors created by the device are essentially temporal illusions.


Anyway, point being, people that get hung up on whether something is "digital" simply don't know any better and you shouldn't pay any attention to them, and are of the unimaginably uninformed belief that the more digital something is, therefore the better it must be.


low-bitrate MP3s are digital too. You gonna take that over vinyl, or the analog master tape? HAH!
 

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And along the same lines, using Pulse Width Modulation, and having only two states doesn't make something "digital". You see the term "digital amplifier" a lot, but that's not really correct. It's quite possible, perhaps even normal to build "switch mode" amplifiers in a completely analog fashion. You so so by comparing the input signal to a very fast triangle wave, setting the output devices to on if the input is greater, and off if it is less. The result is completely analog system with an infinite number of pulse widths.


Being "digital" just means finite states. When you get right down to it, "digital" is completely unusable to humans, it's only useful as a method of storing and transmitting information in a way that makes separation of the desired signal from the noise inherent in the environment possible. But even then, everything digital is represented in some analog fashion somewhere. Bits on the disc use a few analog shapes on the discs to represent the bits. Bits on the cable use analog voltage waveforms to represent the bits, digital audio is converted to analog in order to be heard, and so on...
 

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all of the technologies are digital although some are more digital looking than others. When Dila\\Lcos first came out, many CRT users who crossed over to the dark side (digital) went with JVC because it had a more anlog look to it (like the CRT) even though DLP had better blacks and contrast ratios. DLPs to this day has a digital laser sharpness to it that some people love and some dont
 

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Bottom line. The light source is analog whether bulb or LED. You eyes can only receive and process analog waveforms.. 100% digital wouldn't work without some sort of brain implant and even that might depend on the err viewer having a working analog brain.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mark haflich /forum/post/16975588


Bottom line. The light source is analog whether bulb or LED. You eyes can only receive and process analog waveforms.. 100% digital wouldn't work without some sort of brain implant and even that might depend on the err viewer having a working analog brain.

Don't know if you saw 60 Minutes this past Sunday, that day may not be too far off.
 
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