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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a choice between a Pioneer SC35, Onkyo NR3008 or Denon 4311CI. This will be a gift so price doesn't play a role here. I'm looking for owners of these units or the well informed to help me choose. I'm looking for which will sound best with 7.1 setup. I know everyone has their own opinion but in the end there can be only one. So which is it?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mojoe /forum/post/20770593


I have a choice between a Pioneer SC35, Onkyo NR3008 or Denon 4311CI. This will be a gift so price doesn't play a role here. I'm looking for owners of these units or the well informed to help me choose. I'm looking for which will sound best with 7.1 setup. I know everyone has their own opinion but in the end there can be only one. So which is it?

All great receivers, all will "sound" equally good.


The SC35 uses MCAAC Room Correction while the NR3008 and 4311CI use Audyssey DSX. A preference for either will narrow the choice.


All are feature rich but there are probably certain features unique to each. Certain desirable features will also help with a choice.


Having owned a Denon and now owning a Pioneer, I would choose the Denon from the above. Also, believe the Denon has the highest MSRP.


BTW, nice gift!
 

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Any survey which you admit is based on each respondents opinion will be statistically invalid due to sample size. Look at features, usability, warranty and any other objective data you can find to decide.
 

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If the 3310 not XT, then it's a tougher choice. 3310 probably has it beat in the amp section, the 1712 perhaps wins in room correction (has XT). Other than amps and RC implementation, are there other feature differences that sway you one way or the other?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Should i be concerned with QC issues with the Onkyo? It seems the onkyo has a better chance of breaking down earlier on than the Pioneer or Denon. Just an observation from all the posts I've read. If I can't rely on the Onkyo then It would be between the Pioneer and the Denon. I'm using Definitive Tech Bi-Polars all around. Bottom line is which reciever is best for home theater use.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mojoe /forum/post/20771283


I'm using Definitive Tech Bi-Polars all around. Bottom line is which reciever is best for home theater use.

Go with the one that you feel most comfortable with - they can all

drive the Definitive, and are good for home theater.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mojoe /forum/post/20771283


Should i be concerned with QC issues with the Onkyo? It seems the onkyo has a better chance of breaking down earlier on than the Pioneer or Denon. Just an observation from all the posts I've read. If I can't rely on the Onkyo then It would be between the Pioneer and the Denon. I'm using Definitive Tech Bi-Polars all around. Bottom line is which reciever is best for home theater use.
MAY be issues with Audyssey and bi-polar speakers (maybe with MCAAC as well). Not sure if issues are real but research this.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mojoe /forum/post/20772121


Josh are you running your fronts large or small?

If you have a decent sub or subs, then you should almost always set your mains to small, no matter how good your mains are. This is assuming that you have a sub that matches your speakers capability. A matching sub will be able to provide more sound pressure at the lower frequencies than the mains. The general rule of thumb is to cross your mains to your sub at half an octave above the -3db point of the mains. So if your mains have a -3db point of 40hz, then set the sub crossover point at 60hz. If the -3db point of your mains is 60hz, half an octave would tell you to use 90hz for the crossover, but most would use 80hz because once you get above 80hz you can have localization issues. You can get away with higher (above 80hz) crossover points if you have multiple subs and have them near your mains.


Added

Also note that setting your crossover point to 80Hz, may not give you an actual in room measured crossover point of 80hz.
 
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