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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello AVSForum,


I have an Intel Atom media server that I use solely for local stereo music reproduction. I wish to expand its uses to include streaming via DLNA to a television. I do not want to build an HTPC, or purchase a streaming device other than what is built in to the TV.


I am aware of the limitations of DLNA and I have no desire for high definition blu-ray rips, HD audio bitstreaming or anything similar. My media is the bog-standard 700mb AVI DivX rips, and I am satisfied with the video quality. All I want is a simple, one-remote solution for streaming that my largely technologically-illiterate partner can understand.


Which television manufacturers currently support the most file formats and resolutions via DLNA streaming? Given the processing power of the Atom, I would prefer to avoid transcoding if possible.


Thank you for the help.
 

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I hope you will take the advice of many here, Displays are for Displaying and Streamers are for Streaming. If there was one great display that did streaming well, it would be all over the forums, none do.


There is absolutely nothing difficult about operating any of the add on streamers. One or two button pushes and your streaming. If it's button literacy that is the issue, you may want to look at a decent remote such as a Harmony, rather than limit your self to only certain displays that might play what you want.


Sorry if that is not the answer you were looking for, perhaps someone else will post what that elusive display is. But I too was in your position several years ago and ended up beating my head against the wall trying to get my display to stream what it claimed it would, it never did, and the $50 I spent on a WD streamer was much less than the time I wasted was worth. Now there are even better options all for under $100. Buy a display that looks good to you , buy a streamer to stream your content. Makes life much simpler...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Unfortunately, adding a streamer is the opposite of making life simpler. Firstly, the streamer would require something to sit on, as I plan to mount the TV to the wall. We don't have cable, play DVDs or anything similar - essentially, I would be buying a stand just for the streamer, whereas I could have the TV alone on the wall without. Secondly, this adds clutter, both mentally and physically, which I am not willing to do.


Thank you for the suggestion, but I am still going to look at built-in TV streaming. If DLNA is really as unworkable as this forum seems to think, I would rather do without a TV than require a streamer.
 

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Streamers are not much bigger than a deck of cards, so a table or stand would be overkill. Odds are it could be Velcroed to the back of the display pointing up and you would not be aware it was there.



My streamer of choice if I was buying one today would be the Roku 2. The XD will give you more than you're looking for, is wireless and future proofs your purchase.


From the site:


Size


3.3 x 3.3 x 0.9 inches

http://www.roku.com/roku-products#4
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sarahfacecopter /forum/post/20822720


. . . If DLNA is really as unworkable as this forum seems to think . . .

I don't think DLNA is unworkable, but trying to find the right DLNA player in a TV might be.


You obviously have done your research, so it might simply take a little more. Getting the opinions of users on this forum was a good start, but I believe you are on the bleeding edge, and may find that no one here is on that edge with you. Hopefully someone will chime in with actual experience, but I wouldn't count on it.


Barring hearing from those that have been there, here is what I would do:

Make a list of DLNA TVs that you might consider (size may be your leading criteria). Then call the dealers or manufacturers to see if they can provide the DLNA certificate for each TV. The certificate lists the "profiles" that the TV can play. Post any results here, and I can help decipher the certificate.


Personally, I would love to see a good comparison of DLNA capabilities in the different TVs on the market.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sarahfacecopter /forum/post/20822720


Unfortunately, adding a streamer is the opposite of making life simpler. Firstly, the streamer would require something to sit on, as I plan to mount the TV to the wall. We don't have cable, play DVDs or anything similar - essentially, I would be buying a stand just for the streamer, whereas I could have the TV alone on the wall without. Secondly, this adds clutter, both mentally and physically, which I am not willing to do.


Thank you for the suggestion, but I am still going to look at built-in TV streaming. If DLNA is really as unworkable as this forum seems to think, I would rather do without a TV than require a streamer.

I agree with Matt L, you're wanting simplicity for something that can be very complicated. An "All In One Device" is going to be far from simple. Sounds like you don't have an AVR, Bluray player, or any other components.


Also sounds like you don't care about video quality, why buy a new display and not use it to it's full potential?
 

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I think you should be fine if you get a HDTV that is DLNA certified and licensed by Divx... I believe I saw a few at Fry's Electronics... if your media is the bog-standard 700mb AVI DivX rips, there should be no transcoding involved. But if you are asking for HDTVs that supports the most file formats such as MKV, h.264, etc - none exists if you are using DLNA because it would need transcoding.


Those file formats are only supported for streaming if the HDTV supports SAMBA or NFS streaming.


The best thing is if you have an electronics retailer with a good return policy - find an HDTV that supports DLNA, UPnP, and Divx and try it out. If it works for what you need keep it or return it to get the one exactly you want with those features (i.e. larger Screen). If it doesn't work return it... either way report back to this thread to inform and help others like you...



But if you can wait a few days... I'm getting a brand spanking new 42 inch + 3D HDTV and I think it has those features - I can test it and try it out for you if you like...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by colour /forum/post/20822775


I agree with Matt L, you're wanting simplicity for something that can be very complicated. An "All In One Device" is going to be far from simple. Sounds like you don't have an AVR, Bluray player, or any other components.


Also sounds like you don't care about video quality, why buy a new display and not use it to it's full potential?

I don't currently have a TV. I figure if I'm going to buy one, I might as well get one with a featureset I would actually use. Additionally, every TV I have looked at, even the low end ones, are all DLNA enabled.


I wouldn't say that I don't care about the video quality, just that I find 700mb DivX rips to be the sweet spot - below that is unenjoyable, and higher than that I don't actually gain any enjoyment from the better picture quality.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkHotchkiss /forum/post/20822769


I don't think DLNA is unworkable, but trying to find the right DLNA player in a TV might be.


You obviously have done your research, so it might simply take a little more. Getting the opinions of users on this forum was a good start, but I believe you are on the bleeding edge, and may find that no one here is on that edge with you. Hopefully someone will chime in with actual experience, but I wouldn't count on it.


Barring hearing from those that have been there, here is what I would do:

Make a list of DLNA TVs that you might consider (size may be your leading criteria). Then call the dealers or manufacturers to see if they can provide the DLNA certificate for each TV. The certificate lists the "profiles" that the TV can play. Post any results here, and I can help decipher the certificate.


Personally, I would love to see a good comparison of DLNA capabilities in the different TVs on the market.

I will probably go this route, thank you for the offer of help. I was hoping that there would be a clear 'brand winner' to guide my choice, but it seems that DLNA is a more byzantine world than I would have imagined. Nothing seemed simpler to me than having everything (tuner, streamer, netflix, etc) built in to the TV, and that is very appealing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt L /forum/post/20822766


Streamers are not much bigger than a deck of cards, so a table or stand would be overkill. Odds are it could be Velcroed to the back of the display pointing up and you would not be aware it was there.



My streamer of choice if I was buying one today would be the Roku 2. The XD will give you more than you're looking for, is wireless and future proofs your purchase.


From the site:


Size


3.3 x 3.3 x 0.9 inches

Thank you for the suggestion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by sgvroadster /forum/post/20822810


I think you should be fine if you get a HDTV that is DLNA certified and licensed by Divx... I believe I saw a few at Fry's Electronics... if your media is the bog-standard 700mb AVI DivX rips, there should be no transcoding involved. But if you are asking for HDTVs that supports the most file formats such as MKV, h.264, etc - none exists if you are using DLNA because it would need transcoding.


Those file formats are only supported for streaming if the HDTV supports SAMBA or NFS streaming.


The best thing is if you have an electronics retailer with a good return policy - find an HDTV that supports DLNA, UPnP, and Divx and try it out. If it works for what you need keep it or return it to get the one exactly you want with those features (i.e. larger Screen). If it doesn't work return it... either way report back to this thread to inform and help others like you...



But if you can wait a few days... I'm getting a brand spanking new 42 inch + 3D HDTV and I think it has those features - I can test it and try it out for you if you like...

Anything like MKV or h.264 is not needed for me - I only brought up the transcoding because I'm sure some of the files I have are encoded quite differently. Utilizing the return policy of Best Buy was my fallback option, but I was hoping I could find the answer before resorting to that.


Regardless, I would be happy to hear how your HDTV and DLNA experience goes. Good luck!
 

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The brand names TV's with best media players are LG, Samsung and Sharp in terms of codec support.


Worst are Sony, Panasonic, Philips & Toshiba.


In general the latest models or more high end models tend to get the decent media players built in. Also some models may or may not have additional features for example Panasonic and LG allow reading SMB network shares from their media players too but only for specific models in certain country's.


But as all the others have said still vastly inferior to a network media player.
 

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I will chime in and say I am perfectly happy with my Samsung UN46D6000 for streaming.


I have a server setup running serviio and have had no problems playing media over our network direct to the TV. .avis and .mkvs
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by subsynth /forum/post/20823503


I will chime in and say I am perfectly happy with my Samsung UN46D6000 for streaming.


I have a server setup running serviio and have had no problems playing media over our network direct to the TV. .avis and .mkvs

That's great news, thank you. What kind of hardware is in your server? For your .avis, does the TV scale them to the screen size well enough?


From what I understand, Serviio supports more file formats natively (eg, it will try its hardest NOT to transcode if the TV can support the format, unlike WMP, which transcodes seemingly no matter what) which makes it appealing for my low-powered Atom server.
 

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I have a Zotac Hd11 for my server, it's an Atom d510


I use that server as an HTPC for our bedroom TV, which we seldom watch. But in tests it plays media files and netflix over HDMI just fine as well.


I tried a few different DLNA server options, inlcuding Mezzmo, Serviio was the easiest to setup and offered the options I wanted for sorting and display.


Now the TV side menu of how the media shows up isn't the prettiest, doesn't really matter to me though, and since you are looking for a built-in solution, it shouldn't matter to you either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by subsynth /forum/post/20824403


I have a Zotac Hd11 for my server, it's an Atom d510


I use that server as an HTPC for our bedroom TV, which we seldom watch. But in tests it plays media files and netflix over HDMI just fine as well.


I tried a few different DLNA server options, inlcuding Mezzmo, Serviio was the easiest to setup and offered the options I wanted for sorting and display.


Now the TV side menu of how the media shows up isn't the prettiest, doesn't really matter to me though, and since you are looking for a built-in solution, it shouldn't matter to you either.

Fantastic news, thank you. I actually prefer the folder-based UI of DLNA, especially after seeing some of the media browser setups around here.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sarahfacecopter /forum/post/0


Hello AVSForum,


I have an Intel Atom media server that I use solely for local stereo music reproduction. I wish to expand its uses to include streaming via DLNA to a television. I do not want to build an HTPC, or purchase a streaming device other than what is built in to the TV.


I am aware of the limitations of DLNA and I have no desire for high definition blu-ray rips, HD audio bitstreaming or anything similar. My media is the bog-standard 700mb AVI DivX rips, and I am satisfied with the video quality. All I want is a simple, one-remote solution for streaming that my largely technologically-illiterate partner can understand.


Which television manufacturers currently support the most file formats and resolutions via DLNA streaming? Given the processing power of the Atom, I would prefer to avoid transcoding if possible.


Thank you for the help.

Well, like many, I have my doubts when it comes to DLNA. You might want to have a look at Plex which runs on higher end LG TV's under the name MediaLink and as a client on some Samsung TV's. The Plex Media Server would run on your atom based PC and organize your media quite nicely. There is a forum devoted to Plex on LG Smart TV's and Samsung TV's over at the Plex website.


Philip
 

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just curious, not sure anyone knows yet, but I thought I would ask anyway...

how long will it take before a media streamer bought today becomes horribly obsolete?

also, anyone know how long will it take before a TV/display bought today becomes horribly obsolete?


just curious what the delta is between the two?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by pmcd /forum/post/20829288


Well, like many, I have my doubts when it comes to DLNA. You might want to have a look at Plex which runs on higher end LG TV's under the name MediaLink and as a client on some Samsung TV's. The Plex Media Server would run on your atom based PC and organize your media quite nicely. There is a forum devoted to Plex on LG Smart TV's and Samsung TV's over at the Plex website.


Philip

wow i had no idea samsung had a plex app, I've installed it on the TV and I'm gonna try the server setup now. Thanks for the headsup!
 
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