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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I just picked up an open box Hughes E86 from Best Buy for a good deal. I live in a sudivision with lots of condos around me. I currently get the standard DirecTV signal by pointing the dish such that it barely clears (ostensibly) one of the buildings in front of me. Which way do I have to turn the new 3 lnb hdtv dish relative to the old one? Left or right (my suspicion)? Or up or down? Or both? I live near Chicago. I just want to make sure that I can get the hdtv satellite with a clear field of view before I take the full plunge.


Thanks,

Young
 

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SAT A (where most of the SD Directv channels are located) is at 101 degrees. SAT B where HDNET and HBO HD are located are on SAT B which is at 119 degrees. SAT C where Showtime HD is located is at 110 degrees. You current dish points at SAT A only. The support for the LNB array on the 3 LNB dish points further to the west roughly at 110 degrees. Plug in the E86 and use the set up menu. It will ask for your zip code. When you put in your zip code, it will give you the azimuth and tilt for your location. The azimuth tells you how high above the horizon the dish needs to point and the tilt cants the dish off the horizontal for the best alignment of the dish to the 3 satellites. You may or may not be able to tell if you'll get signal by eyeballing it. If its a borderline situation, you may not know if you can pick up all three satellites until to put up the dish and check the signal strengths for all 3 satellites.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the quick response. That pretty much answers it. So, it looks like 9 more degrees to the west for me. That should be fine since there is no additional obstruction to the west of my current dish's pointing direction. HDNET, here I come!


Young
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
BTW, how difficult is the installation of the new dish? Is this something a reasonably handy or technically inclined person can handle? Will it take long? I'm asking this because I discovered that professional installation was over $100! I hear some of the dishes have bubble levels on them which should help the whole process along, right? Any other tips/guides for self-installation? BTW, I'm mounting this to a standard fence pole that is anchored into a bucket of cement (rules of the condo association disallows attaching anything permanent to the building or my own balcony).


Thanks again,

Young
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
How difficult is it to replace an old SD DirecTV dish with a new 3 lnb dish? Is this something a reasonably handy or technically inclined person can handle? Will it take long? I'm asking this because I discovered that professional installation was over $100! I hear some of the dishes have bubble levels on them which should help the whole process along, right (making sure I have a plumb pole to mount to)? Any other tips/guides for self-installation? BTW, I'm mounting this to a standard fence pole that is anchored into a bucket of cement (rules of the condo association disallows attaching anything permanent to the building or my own balcony).


Thanks,

Young
 

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Consumer installation of the dish shouldn't be that bad, as you said make sure you foot or pole is perfectly level. Find the polarization, elevation and a rough azimuth, set your dish, and slowly move it from left to right, or vise versa. If no signal if found, slightly raise or lower the elevation and sweep left to right again. You will find it! Good Luck


David
 

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I installed my original Directv system in 1996. The upgrade to the oval 3 LNB dish isn't much harder. Getting the mast plumb in both directions is crucial. Setting the azimuth and tilt correctly is vital. Then it's just a matter to rotating the dish on the mast until you start getting signal strength on the singal strength meter on the STB hooked to the TV. Then it's just a mater of fine tuning. My dish is at ground level adjacent to my patio, so I turned up the volume on the TV to help me get the maxiumum signal strength while tweeking the dish position. It took maybe 20 minutes and then I tightened everything down and was good to go. Obviously a roof or eave mount will take more time and possible require more than one person to monitor the signal strength.
 

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Make sure the pole is plumb in all directions is critical. Have someone watch the signal meter while you are adjusting so you don't have to run back and forth. Took me about 1/2 hour to get it right - after a couple of hours fooling around 'till the wall was shimmed to make the mount perfectly plumb.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks everyone. It was very easy. I was anticipating the worst, but it only took me about 1/2 hour (net) or less to swap. Maybe I was lucky but I think anyone can hit those birds! Getting my pole (planted into a bucket of cement) perfectly plumb was key, I believe. I didn't even use a compass!
 
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