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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK, this may be a silly question, but why frame out using 2x4's or 2x6's, instead of just using furring strips attached to the concret block walls with rigid insulation, then drywall when finishing a basement? Is it just for accoustics?


Thanks,

Steve
 

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I saw that design option in a home depot book. In my basement, we would FREEZE. I framed it for R value.


Plus, it would probably be a beatch to run all the cabling and electrics in the room designed that way with furring strips, especially if you had 3 or 4 block walls.


Don't know the impact on the acoustics. Someone here might know.


(For the guys that don't have to worry about furring out theirs walls, watch the movie Ghost Ship - here's a quote; "nice titties." Oops, can I say that?)
 

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Ghost Ship was great, but I wish the bloody scenes weren't quite so graphic. As for the singer in the red dress.... Purrr....
 

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Steve,


Wall construction is a function of desired isolation ("sound proofing"). Many want to take the opportunity to isolate the sound within the room, and this requires separate walls. If isolation isn't such an issue, then framing as you describe is fine.


Ted
 

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You may run into some problems with your electrical boxes in the construction method you are describing. The box size is determined by the number of wires, connectors, switches and outlets in each box. You may want to check out the requirements of your wiring before you commit to a shallow depth wall. You may be forced to use surface mount electrical boxes connected with surface mount conduit if you are going to build it to code.


One book I have says that the best you can do from an insulation perspective is R7 with that type of design. In my county R11 is required by code.
 

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The main reason why I didn't use firring strips is because my basement walls are poured concrete. When they were pouring for my house it must have been a Friday afternoon on pay day because there isn't a single 5 ft portion of wall that is straight or plumb.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ok, check out the pics in my signature to see what issues I will have. also, I just measured the height, and looks like I have to go the no permit route due to the 7 ft I will have in the theater area. The rest of the basement will be 7'8"...
 

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Finally got my pics uploaded here.
 

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Steve:


I took a look at your pictures and I have a couple of suggestions


With respect to the wall framing that will sit under the air ducts, I would use a double thickness top plate. drill holes(1/4 inch or so depending on fasteners) through the top plate to the wall, Drill a hole in the concrete and use a masonry anchor to secure the top plate to the wall. IN some cases you may need an expanding type in other you may need a toggle type. You will need to shim between the header and the concrete at each anchor as needed to get a straight and plumb wall. Fasten bottom plate with the powered concrete anchors. The fasteners I used in a similar situation had to be counter sunk into the header so the wall board would fit flush. I just used a 1 inch bit and drilled 1/2 inch deep. I used washers under the heads of the fasteners.


I'm assuming you will put a soffit around the ducts so pay attention to the firestopping requirements where the wall meets the soffit.


Looking at the ceiling I see a couple of poorly located pipes. Assuming you don't want to sacrifice even an inch in that location they gotta go.


I would relocate those right next to the ducts and include in the soffit, move to the opposite wall and include in a dummy soffit on the right, or get out that drill and put holes in those joists and run the pipes up out of the way.


Working with copper pipes is a breeze. It took me about 30 minutes to get the hang of it.


You just need the torch, cleaning and cutting materials and your good to go. I bought some extra pipe and fittings and practiced on my work bench for 30 minutes. Then I cut into my water supply and the 100 or so joints I soldered are still holding. All together you can assemble all the tools and stuff for about $50. Some pipe and fittings to relocate your pipes another $20 to $50 depending how far you want to move them. Just remember you never want to leave any copper pipe touching a different type of metal when you are done. Like coming in contact with those ducts. Use copper mounting brackets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
yeah, i definitely could, and may in fact do it, but i'll have to think about if we'll actually use it. I guess it would be better to do it now than regret it later though...
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
well, just talked to an inspector, and the ceiling can be only 7' in a basement with no bedrooms... Now, to get the permit or not...
 

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There was a thread on the topic of Permits within the last couple of weeks that you may want to read.


Opinions varied


Pros: resale issues, safety concerns, helpful tips provided, peace of mind, avoidance of fines, avoid insurance claim hassles


Cons: can be overly zealous (varied by region). I think it tends to be more strict in areas where unions control the trades versus right to work states. Can require detailed plans and fees to change the design, one item mentioned was to move a door 6 inches required approval and a fee, increases home assessment and property taxes.


Bottom line is that if you determine that your county isn't too difficult and your not afraid of the increased assessment do it.
 

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I'm not going the permit route because I've heard stories of people going with permits only to have their property tax increase as much at 50%. I am doing the electrical permit so if there is a fire down the road I'll at least be covered in that regard.


I read the thread that was posted a couple of weeks ago about the permits and there were a couple of people that persued the permit after the build when they were selling. What they did was take pictures of the construction process and when it was time to sell, they presented the inspector with the documentation and they passed. I'm not sure if that will work in everyone's case but that's what I plan on doing. I am building my basement to code using the codebook so I'm not worried about any major issues down the road.


HTH.
 
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