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This maybe a non-issue or a non-topic to you people today. But I'm still going to ask you anyway is that even with all of the AMATEUR & PROSUMER companies that exists below the REAL professional ones(SONY, JVC, PANASONIC & FUJIFILM etc....), is that why videotapes(including audiotapes) are STILL so difficult to make(conceive/design/produce/manufacture)? I mean living in the world of HIGH-DEFINITION technology, even we ourselves can't even make or create the MOST BASIC FUNDAMENTAL tape format(s)? Just want to know why?
 

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This would be the wrong forum for your question. This area is for te reception of HD signals OTA, cable, etc.
 

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This maybe a non-issue or a non-topic to you people today. But I'm still going to ask you anyway is that even with all of the AMATEUR & PROSUMER companies that exists below the REAL professional ones(SONY, JVC, PANASONIC & FUJIFILM etc....), is that why videotapes(including audiotapes) are STILL so difficult to make(conceive/design/produce/manufacture)? I mean living in the world of HIGH-DEFINITION technology, even we ourselves can't even make or create the MOST BASIC FUNDAMENTAL tape format(s)? Just want to know why?
Uhm.. a simple search on Google and at Amazon showed plenty of each still available. Maybe I don't understand your question. Since the technology is nearly obsolete, there's no reason to invest in new ways to manufacture the media.
 

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Vinyl records have at least made a comeback ;)
 

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I'm still figuring out how to make an 8-track...think it's time to give up.
One of my first engineering jobs in radio was winding "carts." Radio carts are like 8-tracks in they're the same size and they're both loop tapes. It's just that radio carts don't have the pinch-roller built in.

Oddly, I ran across a reel of graphite-backed tape not too long ago.
 

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One of my first engineering jobs in radio was winding "carts." Radio carts are like 8-tracks in they're the same size and they're both loop tapes. It's just that radio carts don't have the pinch-roller built in.
Wow, that brings back memories of Spotmaster, ATC and Gates cart machines along with bulk tape erasers. I'll bet there are some mom and pop stations around still using cart machines---and probably RCA 70D turntables, too! I have not set foot in a control room since the mid-80s...I would imagine the technology has changed quite a bit.
 

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Wow, that brings back memories of Spotmaster, ATC and Gates cart machines along with bulk tape erasers. I'll bet there are some mom and pop stations around still using cart machines---and probably RCA 70D turntables, too! I have not set foot in a control room since the mid-80s...I would imagine the technology has changed quite a bit.
Yeah, but quite a lot of it is rather recent. To the topic, it hasn't been ten years since I had 6 VCRs catching prime-time programming, I'd make my notes and haul the tapes into the studio where my producer would dutifully dump the sound bites I wanted onto carts. Now, I record the shows on my home computer, grab the audio with Adobe Audition and save it to a flash drive. Nothing else needs to be done as I can play the files straight from the drive. And archiving is pretty easy since every clip I've gotten from every show for YEARS is sitting on that flash drive. Got rid of all but one SVHS deck. I DO still have boxes of videos.

But, yeah. Buddy's wife just started at a small market station that still has cart decks IN the studio. And I just visited a station I worked for a LONG time ago ..and they're still on the same analog console we bought USED when we launched that station. (No wonder their HD Radio signal isn't quite as crisp as where I am, now).
 

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One of my first engineering jobs in radio was winding "carts.".
owww.. talk about memories of the past Don..one of my first jobs in TvEng was winding bricks (carts) for the RCA TCR-100 commercial players..they used 2" quad tape in a plastic case , held 2 mins max IIRC..:eek:
 

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One of my first engineering jobs in radio was winding "carts." Radio carts are like 8-tracks in they're the same size and they're both loop tapes. It's just that radio carts don't have the pinch-roller built in.

Oddly, I ran across a reel of graphite-backed tape not too long ago.
The college radio station I worked at in the early 70s had a couple of ancient Collins cart machines, mostly for ad playback. I got to be real good at fixing the carts they would "eat."
 

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owww.. talk about memories of the past Don..one of my first jobs in TvEng was winding bricks (carts) for the RCA TCR-100 commercial players..they used 2" quad tape in a plastic case , held 2 mins max IIRC..:eek:
I remember when I sold broadcast video gear walking into stations using those pneumatic automated machines. Man, what a noisy mess. I had to bite my tongue at the antiquated gear in some of those small town stations. OTOH, I made a small fortune updating some of those plants back in the day.
 

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I remember when I sold broadcast video gear walking into stations using those pneumatic automated machines. Man, what a noisy mess. I had to bite my tongue at the antiquated gear in some of those small town stations. OTOH, I made a small fortune updating some of those plants back in the day.
The Ampex model was a bit more popular in the UK I think - and some commercial stations used to pre-comp adverts rather than having a cart machine. However they stayed into service long after 2" Quad had been retired for production. 2" Quad was replaced by 1" C format pretty universally in the UK (with a bit of Beta SP and MII at the low-end), but there was never a 1" equivalent (or wasn't one that I ever saw) for the 2" Cart machines, so they continued in service until they were replaced by D2 (Digital Composite 3/4" cassette-based) cart machines (mostly) here for advert playout.

Programme playout from cart machines was a wider mix of D2, D3 (1/2" Digital Composite used by the BBC in MARC machines), and then when 16:9 SD arrived D5 (Channel 4 1/2" SD Digital Component - the precursor to HD-D5) and DigiBeta were the dominant formats, though Profile and other servers quickly replaced tape for playout to air, and decks were relegated to ingest (and are now being replaced by file delivery in AS11 MXF-wrapped 100Mbs AVCi VERY quickly here)
 

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When I started in broadcast tv (U.S.), we ran individual spots on our Ampex quad vtr's (1200 and 2000 model). If we had time, and a break had a lot of spots in it, we would edit together a "spot reel" so one machine was all that was required to play all the spots for the break. We then got the Ampex ACR 25. As mentioned, it was a two transport, 2" quad format machine. Even though it was noisy, we rarely had any problems at all with it. Management then decided we needed something better. So, we got the Ampex ACR 225. I absolutely HATED that machine. IIRC, it was a D2 format with four transports. That machine was so "smart", it was "stupid". When it worked, it was great. But, we were constantly having problems with the transports. We finally (much later) switched over to servers. I was so happy to see that happen so we could ditch that 225. As mentioned, our experience was that it was a big headache. The 25, although less capable, was a MUCH better machine/very reliable, IMO.
 

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So, we got the Ampex ACR 225. I absolutely HATED that machine.
I worked on an ACR225 for years, and I hated it.
The transports constantly had problems, the robot was pretty good, calculating a vector trajectory, but when it went out of calibration it would punch the tapes through the plexiglass doors in front.
hated it with a passion.
 

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My last dealing with our ACR's were to put them in a dumpster and haul them off. That was a nice fee...
 

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My last dealing with our ACR's were to put them in a dumpster and haul them off. That was a nice fee...
Pulled into the NBC affiliate for my routine Friday segment, two weeks ago, to find one of those big-ass, flatbed-transported dumpsters eating up the parking lot. Filled to overflowing with all kinds of NTSC gear. U-matics, test gear ..even some 16:9 rack monitors. VHS gear.. you name it, it was in there. The CE said "most of it will be gone by morning just for the copper." About half was still there when I came back, last week.
 

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I worked on an ACR225 for years, and I hated it.
The transports constantly had problems, the robot was pretty good, calculating a vector trajectory, but when it went out of calibration it would punch the tapes through the plexiglass doors in front.
hated it with a passion.
As I mentioned, our ongoing problems were with the xports. The "robot" never caused problems. One time, for an upcoming break, the 225 saw there would be a conflict between spot lengths and unload/reload times. So, it created a spot reel to cover the event. There was ONE essential spot that had to air for that break. And, guess what? It JAMMED in the xport while the spot reel was being created. So, my only resort was to pull up a small chair to stand on (it was the top xport that jammed), get some screwdrivers and literally take the xport apart to retrieve the required cart. I then reloaded it into the robot, told the computer to use only 3 xports and make the spot reel. It got done JUST IN TIME for the break. I reiterate--I hated that machine.
 

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I had the TCR100 jam up on me overnight fairly often..I had to go down the hall to get the girl in radio to hold
the rest button while I unjammed the beast. And kids these days complain about servers..
 
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