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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought an RP82 in Hong Kong to use with HT1000 projector and was suprised to see that it has no black level contol setting which the US versions have.



Under settings there is:


TV ASPECT

PROGRESSIVE OUT

STILL MODE

NTSC DISC OUTPUT


on the manual it says black level contol is for USA & CANADA and NTSC DISC OUTPUT is for ASIA.


It seems the Asian RP82 is different is this respect,


How does it effect me that I cannot set the Black Level Control?


Is my RP82 producing an inferior picture to the USA models?


Anyone have any comments on this?
 

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I'm not 100% certain of this info, but its an educated guess.


There are two flavors of NTSC, NTSC-M and NTSC-J. "J" is the Japanese equivalent which defines a darker black level than NTSC-M does. As far as I know, that's the only difference between thet two. Since the J standard is 'better' quality-wise, most TVs here can handle either signal.


PROBABLY all the whole "enhanced black level" setting does on an American model is swap between North American and Japanese standards for black level. On a model meant to be sold in NTSC-J areas, that would be sort of pointless.


But I could be totally wrong..
 

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I believe Innerloop has it right. In North America, NTSC sets black at 7.5 IRE, but PAL, SECAM, and NTSC as used in other areas set black at 0 IRE. One of those historical/technological oddities.
 

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All NTSC countries except Japan use 7.5 IRE for black level. Japan changed to 0 IRE in early 90's when NHK started MUSE HD broadcasting. Since HD uses 0 IRE, this made it easy to calibrate display to single setting. In NTSC standard M and J stand for RF frequency channel assignments. TV channels in Japan have different frequencies assignments from other NTSC countries thus it is called NTSC-J.
 
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