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From Projector Central:


Why was the Sony HS10 dropped from the Highly Recommended list? Well, it wasn't because there is anything wrong with the product, as some recent email inquiries have wondered. The HS10 is a fine machine for the money. However, given the changing dynamics of the competitive landscape, the Panasonic L300U, the NEC LT240, and the Epson TW100 each represent better overall values at this point in time. The Highly Recommended list will change over time as new products appear and as street prices change. That doesn't mean the projectors that get removed are no longer great products--it is just that we want to spotlight those few products that we believe are currently delivering the very best performance for the money. As time goes on, new products will be added, and currently listed products will be taken down as the industry is in constant flux.
 

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In the below quoted section from Projector Central you will see that some categories have more than one.


It's almost like someone else is asking them not to put it up there. Or maybe they think that with supply being low they should remove it to influence others so quantity can increase.

Quote:
Highly Recommended Home Theater Projectors

(by price category)


Price range: $7,000 to $10,000



JVC DLA-SX21U and Dukane 9017. An elegant home theater solution for those who want the very best in color performance. For most dramatic presentation, we suggest a high contrast gray screen with two-way electric masking with this unit. It is notably brighter and higher in physical resolution than the InFocus Screenplay 7200 below, and thus one can go to screen sizes larger than 100" diagonal with less concern for image degradation. An excellent value in today's market. Dukane markets this projector with a 5-year warranty. If you buy it under the JVC label you get a 3-year warranty.See review for more details.



InFocus Screenplay 7200 and Toshiba TDP-MT8U. HDTV performance is phenomenal, and DVD is beautiful. These units are designed for darkened home theater environments, and ambient light should be kept to a minimum--none would be ideal, especially if using a standard white screen. For optimum results we would use the Stewart Firehawk and keep the diagonal screen size to 100". You can certainly go larger with these units if you want to. But as with any projector, as you expand the image you spread the light over a larger surface area and diminish the picture quality.


Price range: $5,000 to $7,000



Sanyo PLV-70, aka the Boxlight Cinema 20HD. For large 16:9 widescreen applications. The image is brilliant and extremely high resolution. It is much brighter than the InFocus/Toshiba units just noted. A terrific scaler onboard yields incredible detail. An ideal solution for multimedia entertainment rooms with some degree of ambient light, but can be used in a darkened viewing room also. Use a gray, high-contrast, low-gain screen with this projector. This is a big projector with a big picture--plan on a minimum 100" diagonal 16:9 screen to take advantage of its power and resolution. Not suitable for small rooms and small screens.


Price range: $4,000 to $5,000



NEC HT1000. An elegant product from NEC, this high contrast projector delivers state of the art imagery and is suitable for most typical home theater set-ups. This native 4:3 format XGA projector will nevertheless be most commonly used as a 16:9 unit, with 4:3 material being displayed in the center of a 16:9 screen. Though it will throw images 120" or larger, for best results keep image size to 100" diagonal (16:9) or less. Use it in eco-mode with a Stewart Firehawk screen.



Optoma H56. Another beautiful 4:3 projector that can function equally well as a 16:9 machine. Image quality rivals that of the much more expensive 1280x720 DLP projectors. Best for light-controlled home theaters although it can tolerate some ambient light without washing out. As with the NEC HT1000 above, we recommend keeping image size to 100" diagonal for best results. Ideal screen match is the Stewart Firehawk.


Price range: $3,000 to $4,000



Epson TW100 This newly improved widescreen format projector delivers the best overall picture quality of any 16:9 projector under $5,000. Strongly recommended for both DVD and HDTV use. Short throw distance and no need for a lot of rear clearance makes it ideal for smaller rooms. It has plenty of punch to go up to 120" diagonal screen size if you want to, but best image performance is with a 100" screen. Match it with a Stewart Firehawk screen if your budget allows, and you will have one of the finest home theater set-ups available today.


Price range: $2,000 to $3,000



NEC LT240 Now selling for under $3,000, the LT240 is an outstanding value for the money. The LT260 is a brighter version of the LT240 with a longer throw lens. Most home theater users won't need the extra brightness. However, they are both great products for the money. Due to its low price, short throw distance and ample lumen output, the LT240 is an ideal choice for those looking for the best image for the money in this price range. Considering the budget level, the Da-lite High Contrast CinemaVision is the best match for these products.


Price range: Under $2000



Panasonic PT-L300. It has great contrast for an LCD projector, but for the best possible results you should set this up with a high contrast gray screen such as Da-lite's HCCV. The Stewart Firehawk is even better, but most buyers at this budget level won't want to spring for this more expensive option.


InFocus X1. For entry level home theater. This is a stellar performer for the money, but mind the caveats in the review (see review). Also, check the detailed comparison between the Panny L300 and the X1.


Sanyo PLV-Z1. Another excellent value for the money. Read the reviews of all three units in this category to see which is right for you.
 

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The HS10 when it was first reviewed on PJ was the first time I've seen any favorable reviews of a Sony projector over there even though there have been some legendary HT projectors both digital and CRT.


There's a distinct anti-Sony bias at PJ and even by many on this board, despite the fact that the 10HT defined and changed the industry when it came out. I don't really understand the phenomenon or the history behind it.
 

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Well instead of looking at it as a biased opinion problem on that site, look at it from what a consumer would do. I wouldn't buy the HS10 right now. There are too many good options below it and above it by only a few hundred dollars. Not a good bet anymore for the money. JUST MY OPINION
 

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I'm not sure how biased they could be since the HS10 was on their highly recommended list in the first place. Really, it seems to me the main reasons people choose the HS10 are because of it's high resolution and HDCP capability. It doesn't have much competition in those two areas, but apparently that's not number one on Projector Central's list of desirable specs.
 

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Quote:
Well instead of looking at it as a biased opinion problem on that site, look at it from what a consumer would do. I wouldn't buy the HS10 right now. There are too many good options below it and above it by only a few hundred dollars. Not a good bet anymore for the money. JUST MY OPINION
What options? This is not a slam at all, I am curious to know if I should be considering alternatives as I have pretty much narrowed down to the HS10. I have not found any other projectors with the resolution or DVI w/ HDCP even close to this price. I was initially leaning towards the TW100 given its favorable reviews, but, alas, no HDCP on the DVI. Beyond that, all of the wide screen projectors make a significant jump in price to the $5K+ range that meet these two requirements in particular.


Am I missing some? Is the ~35% increase in resolution for HD between WXGA and XGA not worth it?
 

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That's true. I thought the TW100 was HDCP. If the Panny was HDCP then I don't think the Sony would ever have been on the list after it came out.


If I was back in the market I would save up another grand and get the HT1000 from NEC. You can find them for 3900-4100. Worth the extra money I think.


And it's not always resolution. The fact that you can barely see much of a difference between the panny and the sony is a good example.
 

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blkwrxwgn,


Have you seen the HS10 and HT1000 in HD? I have a tough time finding PJs to view where I live (in fact, I have only seen the Marantz which stickers at $12K, which is WAY out of my budget), so I am curious about the real impact of the difference in resolution. Percentage-wise, it seems big and scares me a bit, but how does it actually look?


As and aside, I thought the Panny L300U did have HDCP, I just discarded it because it was 1/4 HD format.
 

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>>I just discarded it because it was 1/4 HD format
 

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Xander,


Have you gone through SMART III on your HS10? Also, I thought the L300U was speced at the same CR as the HS10 (or is it 100 greater...)?
 

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Uther, only completed the color part and not the contrast part (will do so soon :)). The color is now perfect with the CC40R. I did not have the equipment to measure CR on the Panny but I'd speculate it was quite a bit higher.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by blkwrxwgn
I wouldn't buy the HS10 right now. There are too many good options below it and above it by only a few hundred dollars. Not a good bet anymore for the money.
There don't seem to be any good options above or below it if you want to do a bit of computer projecting occasionally (web, games, etc.) and not exclusively home theater. Please correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't the HS10, with its 768 rows going to be quite a bit better at projecting a computer screen than the L300U, and a bit better than the slightly more expensive TW100? You basically need a true XGA or WXGA projector, and in the price range the HS10 pretty much rules them all (LCD anyway) for home theater quality with this resolution.


(See also, the separate thread I started on this issue.)


-Karl
 
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