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I went shopping today for the first time in a while (in the store anyway). I noticed something I hadn't seen before. The LCD and LED TVs had contrast ratios like 10,000:1, some higher, some lower, one Westinghouse LED claimed 100,000:1, but most of the regular names had much lower contrast ratios.


The plasma tvs had 2,000,000:1. I thought the higher the better and the bigger the difference between the blackest black and the whitest white.


Are samsung and panasonics LCD and LED that have the lower contrast ratios no good? It is all numbers game after all? Plasma can't be that much better with those big number can it or they'd all still be making them more than LCD and LED.


Thank you for any help. I'm not sure what to buy now. It was plasma for just this reason, inky blacks in movies but retaining details. Video games too. Thanks.
 

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There is only one contrast ratio that counts: the ANSI checker board ratio. Everything else is bs in its purest form. The guy who came up with the "dynamic ratio" should get LWOP.


Unfortunately, he probably got a promotion and every TV manufacturer jumped on the bandwagon of the dynamic contrast.


The single best set among LCDs is LN55C650 with its ANSI CR measured at about 5400.


The measured ratio, however, does not tell the full story. The perceived contrast is where the rubber meets the road. If the room is totally dark, plasma wins. If not, LCDs do. It's that simple.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by likemovies /forum/post/19550108


I went shopping today for the first time in a while (in the store anyway). I noticed something I hadn't seen before. The LCD and LED TVs had contrast ratios like 10,000:1, some higher, some lower, one Westinghouse LED claimed 100,000:1, but most of the regular names had much lower contrast ratios.


The plasma tvs had 2,000,000:1. I thought the higher the better and the bigger the difference between the blackest black and the whitest white.


Are samsung and panasonics LCD and LED that have the lower contrast ratios no good? It is all numbers game after all? Plasma can't be that much better with those big number can it or they'd all still be making them more than LCD and LED.


Thank you for any help. I'm not sure what to buy now. It was plasma for just this reason, inky blacks in movies but retaining details. Video games too. Thanks.

Its pointless to try and compare contrast ratio numbers between manufacturers. The numbers are all grossly inaccurate and each manufacturer has its own method of producing the inflated ratio. Your best bet is to simply narrow it down to the models that fit your budget then do some in-depth online research on each panel and see what other owners are saying. Also, try and check out the tvs in person under lighting that comes close to your home viewing environment (not the bright fluorescent lights of a big box retailer).
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ramazur /forum/post/19550226


There is only one contrast ratio that counts: the ANSI checker board ratio. Everything else is bs in its purest form. The guy who came up with the "dynamic ratio" should get LWOP.


Unfortunately, he probably got a promotion and every TV manufacturer jumped on the bandwagon of the dynamic contrast.


The single best set among LCDs is LN55C650 with its ANSI CR measured at about 5400.


The measured ratio, however, does not tell the full story. The perceived contrast is where the rubber meets the road. If the room is totally dark, plasma wins. If not, LCDs do. It's that simple.

Actually it's not quite that simple as a plasma set has a very nice picture with low to moderate light. An LCD will typically be better in above average lighting to bright lights (not sure why anyone would ever want to watch TV in a brightly lit room).
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marty1781 /forum/post/19550595


Its pointless to try and compare contrast ratio numbers between manufacturers. The numbers are all grossly inaccurate and each manufacturer has its own method of producing the inflated ratio. Your best bet is to simply narrow it down to the models that fit your budget then do some in-depth online research on each panel and see what other owners are saying. Also, try and check out the tvs in person under lighting that comes close to your home viewing environment (not the bright fluorescent lights of a big box retailer).

Even within the same manufacturer the numbers typically are meaningless as you will see one set with a matte screen have a 20,000:1 CR and then one with a gloss panel have a 30:000 : 1 CR with all things being equal. No way does a gloss screen add that much more contrast to a picture but it's done for marketing.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by HTguru3
Even within the same manufacturer the numbers typically are meaningless as you will see one set with a matte screen have a 20,000:1 CR and then one with a gloss panel have a 30:000 : 1 CR with all things being equal. No way does a gloss screen add that much more contrast to a picture but it's done for marketing.
yup
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by HTguru3
No way does a gloss screen add that much more contrast to a picture but it's done for marketing.
In a dark room a glossy screen doesn't do much. Anywhere else it improves the perceived contrast for the same reason why a black car will look gray if you sand the shiny layer. Bottom line: a shiny black object will look better (blacker) than the same black object after sanding.


Even in a moderately bright room - northern exposure on a cloudy day at noon - plasma loses CR-wise because the plasma screen is gray. This, in combination with the ambient light I just defined, limits the black level of plasma to the level dictated by that gray matter you can see so easily when the set is off.


On the other hand, the LCDs, with their clearly higher light output, can afford all kinds of filters that make such sets look very black when off, thereby enhancing the total perceived CR.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ramazur
In a dark room a glossy screen doesn't do much. Anywhere else it improves the perceived contrast for the same reason why a black car will look gray if you sand the shiny layer. Bottom line: a shiny black object will look better (blacker) than the same black object after sanding.


Even in a moderately bright room - northern exposure on a cloudy day at noon - plasma loses CR-wise because the plasma screen is gray. This, in combination with the ambient light I just defined, limits the black level of plasma to the level dictated by that gray matter you can see so easily when the set is off.


On the other hand, the LCDs, with their clearly higher light output, can afford all kinds of filters that make such sets look very black when off, thereby enhancing the total perceived CR.
and why do we care what a set looks like when it's off?



Bottom line a plasma doesn't have to be in a dark room to look good as my plasma looks better in a moderately lit room than my LCD as I'm going off first hand experience. Now if you want to talk set specific you might have a point but to make such a general statement is very misleading. Have you ever owned a plasma TV?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by HTguru3 /forum/post/19551211


and why do we care what a set looks like when it's off?

....because then you can see how "black" that set will look when it's ON in a room at daytime as the black image will not be any blacker than what you see when the set is OFF. Again, in total darkness this does not apply. So, at noon, the LCDs are better. At midnight, they lose the CR contest.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ramazur /forum/post/19552955


....because then you can see how "black" that set will look when it's ON in a room at daytime as the black image will not be any blacker than what you see when the set is OFF. Again, in total darkness this does not apply. So, at noon, the LCDs are better. At midnight, they lose the CR contest.

way to simplistic of an explanation as that's not always the case with all plasmas and all LCDs. Can you explain why my plasma has better blacks in a moderately lit room than my LCD (the LCD is a mid level Samsung a year newer than my plasma)? I noticed you didn't address my question to you so I assume you have no real in home experience for a comparison.
 

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To be fair, LCDs aren't far off from plasmas


For an example, the low-end LTF400HM01 S-PVA panel managed to produce 0.03 cd/m2 @ 130 cd/m2 natively and 0.02 cd/m2 when dimmed (black screen), which translates into ~ 4333:1 ANSI CR and ~ >6000:1 dynamic range.


The 2010 Panasonic G20 yielded ~ 0.02 (black screen) while the LG and Samsung plasmas yielded higher black level. Oddly enough, the S-PVA is cheaper to produce than the panel embedded within the 42G20 PDP.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by likemovies /forum/post/19550108


I went shopping today for the first time in a while (in the store anyway). I noticed something I hadn't seen before. The LCD and LED TVs had contrast ratios like 10,000:1, some higher, some lower, one Westinghouse LED claimed 100,000:1, but most of the regular names had much lower contrast ratios.


The plasma tvs had 2,000,000:1. I thought the higher the better and the bigger the difference between the blackest black and the whitest white.


Are samsung and panasonics LCD and LED that have the lower contrast ratios no good? It is all numbers game after all? Plasma can't be that much better with those big number can it or they'd all still be making them more than LCD and LED.


Thank you for any help. I'm not sure what to buy now. It was plasma for just this reason, inky blacks in movies but retaining details. Video games too. Thanks.


This should help

http://www.practical-home-theater-gu...ast-ratio.html
 
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