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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

This is the first year I've actually done some research before buying a TV. In the past, I just go to the store and pick any TV that just 'gets the job done'. While researching TVs, it seems that almost all manufacturers use VA panels instead of IPS, and this almost makes them immune to criticisms as most people seem to consider the contrast ratio paramount when it comes to the overall picture quality. It seems that by just using a VA panel, you're assured a contrast ratio of no less than 3000:1, and with the proper backlight technology, this could go up 6000:1, as is the case with the Samsung KS series of 2016.

Now, I come to the part that baffles me. LG has been using and continues to use IPS displays in all their higher-end LCD TVs. With IPS, you can barely get 1200:1 contrast, let alone the 3000:1 ratio, which is the norm for TVs with VA panels. Since reviewers and general TV buyers put so much emphasis on contrast, LG LCD TVs continuously get lower ratings than other TVs of the same price bracket. The big question is why LG continues to use IPS panels when, clearly, contrast ratio is considered to be far more important than the extra few degrees of viewing angle that IPS offer over VA panels.

As an example, the Samsung UN55KS8000 gets a much better review than the LG 55UH8500 even though most reviewers say both TVs have stunning pictures when it comes to non-dark scenes. Most people tend to go for the Samsung over the LG simply because of the better dark room performance the Samsung by virtue of simply using a VA panel over an IPS panel.
 

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They use IPS for the increased viewing angle. The average consumer will not notice the worse black level in the show room, but they will notice the off axis fade.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
They use IPS for the increased viewing angle. The average consumer will not notice the worse black level in the show room, but they will notice the off axis fade.
Why doesn't Samsung do the same then if they're afraid they might lose customers when they notice the off axis fade ? There has to be a better reason than that.
 

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Hello,

This is the first year I've actually done some research before buying a TV. In the past, I just go to the store and pick any TV that just 'gets the job done'. While researching TVs, it seems that almost all manufacturers use VA panels instead of IPS, and this almost makes them immune to criticisms as most people seem to consider the contrast ratio paramount when it comes to the overall picture quality. It seems that by just using a VA panel, you're assured a contrast ratio of no less than 3000:1, and with the proper backlight technology, this could go up 6000:1, as is the case with the Samsung KS series of 2016.

Now, I come to the part that baffles me. LG has been using and continues to use IPS displays in all their higher-end LCD TVs. With IPS, you can barely get 1200:1 contrast, let alone the 3000:1 ratio, which is the norm for TVs with VA panels. Since reviewers and general TV buyers put so much emphasis on contrast, LG LCD TVs continuously get lower ratings than other TVs of the same price bracket. The big question is why LG continues to use IPS panels when, clearly, contrast ratio is considered to be far more important than the extra few degrees of viewing angle that IPS offer over VA panels.

As an example, the Samsung UN55KS8000 gets a much better review than the LG 55UH8500 even though most reviewers say both TVs have stunning pictures when it comes to non-dark scenes. Most people tend to go for the Samsung over the LG simply because of the better dark room performance the Samsung by virtue of simply using a VA panel over an IPS panel.
LG isn't unique, other manufacturers use IPS panels in some of their lines. Sony uses it in the 850D line, Vizio uses them in various sizes of their P and M series lines while other sizes are VA. I will give you that LG seems to be unique in concentrating almost entirely on IPS displays.

IPS does have some advantages beyond the increased viewing angle. It can lend itself to more accurate color reproduction, and better response time, leading to less ghosting and smearing. Panasonic used an IPS display mated to a FALD backlight in their super-expensive AX900, which, even though it had poorer native contrast compared to VA displays at the time, had what was considered to be the best color reproduction on the market, and was able to somewhat mitigate the inherent IPS contrast deficit through a high zone count FALD array behind the screen.

LG unfortunately isn't outfitting their sets with advanced 3D LUTs like Panasonic did, and they've eschewed FALD backlights in favor or edge-lit systems, which are cheaper to produce but deliver poorer results. LG invested heavily in IPS display manufacturing ten years ago, so a lot of their choice may just be due to making do with that investment. There's also the facet that LG's high end TVs are their OLED displays, and their LCDs are their mid and entry-level offerings, while Sony, Samsung, and the other major manufacturers are competing with LCDs at the high end.

For dedicated home theater viewing an edge-lit IPS LCD is clearly a bad idea. For other applications they can make sense though - if I were charged with buying displays for a sports bar, industrial or commercial display use, or even home use in situations where the TV wouldn't ever be used to dark-room critical viewing situations yet wide viewing angle would help like in a kitchen or a game room (think billiards, darts, etc, not video games) IPS screens would make a lot of sense.

LG has great displays for HT use, they're just OLEDs and not LCDs.
 

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In theory IPS can give better colors and better viewing angles. Many pro and semi-pro editing monitors are IPS. So the technology is well known and proven, plus it has a following among a certain crowd. I would rather get really good VA with FALD though.
 

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For most living room scenarios, IPS is way more beneficial. Especially since the focal point of furniture arrangement isn't necessarily the TV.
I wish my KS had a wider viewing angle.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Yeah, good question. Of course, both panel types have inherent weaknesses that are hard to get around. I find VA panels to have extremely narrow sweet spots. I was able to detect contrast and co,or shifts with very little head movement. Drove me nuts. IPS panels as everyone knows are seemingly incapable of showing the color black which makes them terrible as a movie watching set. Ugh.

I believe IPS panels do better 3D too for those that care about that.

This is the frustration with the LCD market right now. You have to make major compromises or spend absolute top dollar to achieve happiness. They ought to get rid of edge lit sets. Totally awful way to light a big panel. Then, figure out how to get better black levels in those IPS screens. Go with FALD and use LOTS of zones to keep the artifacts down. I dunno. Nice to see them get this right. Or maybe figure out how to make VA panels have a sweet spot that's wider than 10-15 degrees.

This is why OLED MUST take over. Tired of LCDs and the never ending list of shortcomings and issues.
 

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IPS is the right choice for a computer monitor.
VA is the right choice for a LCD TV.
With a IPS TV with edge LED backlight you will never get the needed contrast for 4k UHD (1 000 to 4 000 nits brightness and full black).
 

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The new QNED Mini-LED LG TVs seemed to be getting decent to good reviews and they're all use a IPS panel. I guess with IPS offering wider viewing angles and Mini-LED backlighting offering much improved contrast, black levels, and blooming control combined makes both QNED90 and QNED99 surprisingly good LG LED TVs for the first time in a long time. But yeah, the real reason LG continues to use IPS panels on many of their LED TVs is not just because of wider viewing angles, but really because I believe LG makes them mediocre on purpose in order to get people to spend more money on their OLED TVs, and lately it's not just LG with this regard actually, Sony as well now during the last couple of years their OLED TVs are getting better & better whereas their LED TVs are getting worse & worse each passing year.
 
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