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One thing that puzzles me about newer AV Receivers is why do they still have so may legacy inputs? Does anyone really need 15 sets of composite inputs? or 8 S-video inputs? or 4 component inputs?


I can see having maybe 5 hdmi, a couple of component, a couple of composite, 2 toslink and 2 coaxial and that's it. Call the inputs component 1 and component 2. It doesn't take a genius to remember that the CD player is connected to component 1.


I would actually pay more for fewer inputs in that it would make it much easier to find where the connections go and possibly save a few inches on receiver height.


Whenever I add a new component, I have to pull out the receiver and try to read everything upside down trying to figure out where to put the wires. Half the writing is blocked by the little nubs for the RCA connections that will never ever be possibly used. It's a pain.
 

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They want to stay backward compatibel, so no one has a reason to avoid buying their latest models. The bigger or more expensive it is, the more you get in terms of inputs or outputs, needed or not
 

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How MUCH more would you pay? Some of the higher-end pre/pros have slide in cards for various input and output connections, but those START in the upper $6,000s.
 

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Not this again.


Yamaha listened to people suggesting they reduce legacy inputs. First off, they managed to make it so you could not hook up a Wii, maybe the most popular game console out there. They had to do a firmware rev to allow enough flexibility that a Wii would work.


Then they made it so that some people with fairly normal setups had to go buy a converter to hook their gear up to.


Also, note that multi-zone setups need at least one set of analog inputs per device. And if video is supported, a composite video input at least.


Just hook up your gear, and let other people who need the extra inputs hook their gear up. It's not like it's costing you a lot more for a few more inputs.
 

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I can't believe you would even wish for less inputs. As long as you use your brain while making connections having a lot of extra inputs doesn't hurt anything. If you cant clearly see the writing on the back of the receiver just look at the owners manual and simply count the inputs so you get the right input when hooking up your connection. I have to use this method every time I make a connection on my receiver. It's not difficult. I would always rather have more inputs then not have them. It leaves room for changes or expansion later on down the road that you may not of had in mind at the time you purchased the receiver.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by KidHorn /forum/post/20884319


One thing that puzzles me about newer AV Receivers is why do they still have so may legacy inputs? Does anyone really need 15 sets of composite inputs? or 8 S-video inputs? or 4 component inputs?


I can see having maybe 5 hdmi, a couple of component, a couple of composite, 2 toslink and 2 coaxial and that's it. Call the inputs component 1 and component 2. It doesn't take a genius to remember that the CD player is connected to component 1.


I would actually pay more for fewer inputs in that it would make it much easier to find where the connections go and possibly save a few inches on receiver height.


Whenever I add a new component, I have to pull out the receiver and try to read everything upside down trying to figure out where to put the wires. Half the writing is blocked by the little nubs for the RCA connections that will never ever be possibly used. It's a pain.

When you buy a new receiver you have plenty of choices. Several out there such as Denon have very few legacy inputs on the entry and mid level models. There is absolutely no reason to complain, buy the receiver that fits your needs.


If you dont like a large number of legacy inputs, don't buy a receiver with them! Pretty simple solution..
 

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Legacy inputs/outputs are decreasing..

Even S-Video has been dropped as well.

The basic challenge facing the AVR brand is who is the target user..

And how many legacy devices will he/she have, present devices and future devices does he/she plan to have. Also adding legacy inputs/outputs is inexpensive compared to digital/HDMI inputs/outputs.


Another thing to keep mind is that the AVR is a global product not just North America, and the input/output options required for one market can vary significantly.

For example..

Just check out the slow penetration of HD in Europe..


Just my $0.02...
 
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