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Discussion Starter #21
Ok....it's been a year since I started this thread, but I'm bumping it up to let everyone know that I'm finally getting rid of this TV. It still works (it's over 21 years old now), but I'll be getting new furniture and all and the handyman at my apt has agreed to move the furniture in for me. Since that new furniture will be replacing the furniture that my TV is on top of, my handyman said he'll be happy to move the TV out of the apartment for me. He'll be moving it out tomorrow. I told him he could either ditch it or keep it if he'd like. My family agreed to it because they're just sick of the sight of that big beast. It weighs a ton, so I'd like to see how my handyman will lift that. He's probably a lot stronger than I thought, lol.
 

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Lol at this thread, hope you regret it
. A CRT can usually last between 25-35 years depending on tube quality! I've repaired 70's(!!!) CRT's that the picture tube was used every day 4-6 hours and it probably had a better quality image in SD that a lcd or plasma. Don't expect that from LCD and plasma, my shop is filled with 08,09 and even 2010 sets, so do think about that!
 

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Discussion Starter #23
I have a 2008 LCD and it still works like a charm. Since I bought that thing, I've never wanted to go back to CRTs again.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrHT /forum/post/18518218


We have a 20 year old Sony Trinitron 27” Tube TV in our living room and till this day, it just won’t die. Well, one out of the two speakers hasn’t been working for years, but other than that, this thing is indestructible. After 20 years of use, this thing will not go. It even makes a weird ringing sound during the first 20-30 mins when turned on….kinda like your ears are ringing. But it goes away after it’s on for a while. But hearing that ringing sound just goes to show how old this beast is. But it still gives great picture and the tuner still works and everything.


My family and I are just dying to replace it with a flat screen, but all of us just don’t like throwing away something that still works fine. So we all agreed to wait until it dies. But how long will that be? Why, after 20 years, won’t this beast die already? We need to move on. Any tips on how to make it die faster? Not kill it! But to help the TV wear out faster so its death comes sooner. Watching it more often seems like the most obvious solution, but it doesn't look like the phosphers are wearing away. It's strange!

I really hope you are joking. As others mentioned move it to the bedroom or den. BUT KEEP THE CRT! Everyone has a preference of what is the perfect screen, I love CRTs that have no lag or dot crawl issues for older game consoles. New flat screens no longer have SVideo input which kills SNES, N64, Gamecube and the PS1. The Gamecube can be brought up to Component but the cable is expensive, I paid fifty bucks for mine. Speaking of component that is also fading, newer sets adding extra HDMI ports and leaving just one component input.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
You guys are kidding, I hope! CRTs are ancient. I might as well buy a typewriter and a rotary dial phone while I'm at it.



One can have hernia just lifting that humongous TV. No joke! It's time that thing goes. If it was lighter in weight, I'll be all for keeping it. But that thing is so heavy that it could collapse the furniture it's on.
 

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I convinced my parents today to replace their 25 year old Mitsubishi 27" console TV. There's absolutely nothing wrong with it, but their current use pattern (watching Netflix, channel surfing basic cable) would be enhanced by not having to jump through hoops to use Netflix (currently they get it through a Wii) and being able to view the QAM stations available over basic cable.


Sadly, the layout of the room prevents maintaining what's probably the most valuable function of that console tv: a piece of furniture to stick flower vases and picture frames on.
 

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Most, if not all LCD's will break within 3-5 years of buying it. Especially Samsung LCD's and no-name brands. My 240 pound 36" 1536p monitor CRT has 11 years old and my 37" 260 pound Mitsu monster has 20 years old and they laugh at LCD. Of course, I was joking when I said you'd regret the picture, since Sony tubes were lame those years (compared to Panasonic and Mitsubishi) anyway but you will regret the construction quality, believe me.

CRT is still the best technology (and the most well-built).


^That's why I stil repair most old sets with wooden frames. try putting things on your lcd and finding a room that fits with a JET GLOSS BLACK TV, especially when all your other furniture is wood.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrHT
You guys are kidding, I hope! CRTs are ancient. I might as well buy a typewriter and a rotary dial phone while I'm at it.
Dude, they don't make things the way they used to anymore. Newer does NOT equal better.




Quote:
Originally Posted by MrHT
One can have hernia just lifting that humongous TV. No joke! It's time that thing goes.
Maybe so, but not if you lift it correctly, which may include having someone (or something) help you move it.



Quote:
Originally Posted by MrHT
If it was lighter in weight, I'll be all for keeping it. But that thing is so heavy that it could collapse the furniture it's on.
How often do you move the TV? I don't know about you, but I spend much more time watching TV than I do moving my TVs around. I have a Panasonic Tau 36" CRT HDTV that weighs a bit more than 200 pounds and has yet to cause any damage to my cheap entertainment unit.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Quote:
Originally Posted by neccrttv
Most, if not all LCD's will break within 3-5 years of buying it. Especially Samsung LCD's and no-name brands.
I find it insulting that you pair Samsung with "no-name" brands. Samsung has a good reputation of having the best LCDs!!! Nuff said!
 

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Yep, they do have the best quality image for LCD for sure. But as a professional TV repairman, I can tell you do that repairing a 2 year old TV with 10 year old capacitors in the power supply (yep, lol at china, the capacitors were 6-7 years old when they were put there and only rated at 1500 hours (NOT LONG)) is not really a good thing. It's not Samsung's fault really. The power supply is not made by them anyway. I was just pairing em for how often they break, not pic quality. Samsung has always been like that anyways. Super quality image but low-quality parts. I wasn't intending to insult samsung tv's but that's what they do to get the price down. You buy premade parts from China and supply a Samsung-built LCD.

Do you know how much no-brand compagnies do that? Samsung makes the best lcd's panels no doubt about that.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrHT /forum/post/20717953


Ok....it's been a year since I started this thread, but I'm bumping it up to let everyone know that I'm finally getting rid of this TV. It still works (it's over 21 years old now)

21 years old! OMG
 

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Discussion Starter #32

Quote:
Originally Posted by neccrttv /forum/post/20719122


Yep, they do have the best quality image for LCD for sure. But as a professional TV repairman, I can tell you do that repairing a 2 year old TV with 10 year old capacitors in the power supply (yep, lol at china, the capacitors were 6-7 years old when they were put there and only rated at 1500 hours (NOT LONG)) is not really a good thing. It's not Samsung's fault really. The power supply is not made by them anyway. I was just pairing em for how often they break, not pic quality. Samsung has always been like that anyways. Super quality image but low-quality parts. I wasn't intending to insult samsung tv's but that's what they do to get the price down. You buy premade parts from China and supply a Samsung-built LCD.

Do you know how much no-brand compagnies do that? Samsung makes the best lcd's panels no doubt about that.

Well, there's a reason why you can find 32" TVs for less than $300 now. You get what you pay for. Increase your budget by a few hundred dollars and you'll get yourself a better built LCD that'll last longer.


Believe me, TVs breaking down within 3-5 years of usage is nothing new. My parents bought a cheap Sony CRT TV 15 years ago and it died in a few years. Why? Because it was cheap!! That 21 year old Sony TV, on the other hand, was a higher end model. Hence its longer lifespan!


And the way technology evolves so fast, I wouldn't mind my electronics breaking down every few years because in a few years, it'll need to be upgraded anyway. Look! We already have 3D TVs out!
 

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Just donate the thing. I had the same exact TV, a 27'' Sony. It took up so much space in my tiny living room that the wife and I finally decided to donate it to Goodwill and pick up a Vizio LCD. My Sony just wouldn't die and the speakers still worked flawlessly. I don't regret making the transition though. Quality screens can be had for reasonable prices and once you experience HD programming (especially in 3d), it's hard to imagine sticking with the old picture. I got something like 15 years out of mine before donating it. I doubt I'll get half of that out of the Vizio I just bought, but I can always hope
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrHT /forum/post/20718938


I find it insulting that you pair Samsung with "no-name" brands. Samsung has a good reputation of having the best LCDs!!! Nuff said!

The no-name brands often contain Samsung internals. Samsung is not a band I'd associate with top quality. The big chains push them for a reason.
Quote:
Originally Posted by neccrttv /forum/post/20718025


Lol at this thread, hope you regret it
. A CRT can usually last between 25-35 years depending on tube quality! I've repaired 70's(!!!) CRT's that the picture tube was used every day 4-6 hours and it probably had a better quality image in SD that a lcd or plasma. Don't expect that from LCD and plasma, my shop is filled with 08,09 and even 2010 sets, so do think about that!

I'd be interested to know what ingredient made those CRTs last so long so well
. I've never seen a CRT TV survive long term use without trashed phosphers that lose all shadow detail and have some degree of redshift. Many CRT monitors were lucky to survive 5 years of heavy use before they went all dark.
 

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Discussion Starter #35

Quote:
Originally Posted by homerging /forum/post/20725980


The no-name brands often contain Samsung internals. Samsung is not a band I'd associate with top quality. The big chains push them for a reason.

What TV brand would you consider top quality? I would like to know because I'll keep that brand in mind when my Samsung LCD dies soon (since it's already over 3 years old).
 

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^^You want to know why 70,80s,90s(up to 95 and some high-end after that) tubes lasted so long. Well, it's easy really. Tube integrity, namely vacuum. A well-made tube with a close to perfect vacuum is the key to having a long-lived picture tube. Any trace of oxygen will make the heater use up 10-100X faster than it's supposed to. Mid-90s was the changing point in CRT. Everybody went from their factories in Canada and the US to Mexico and other countries. They dropped picture quality, construction quality, and of course tube quality. Any tech can see that almost ALL picture tubes from the end of the 80s and beginning of the 90s had MUCH better quality. I've swapped 90s tubes in 2003,2004 sets and they look as good as new. They even have BETTER quality image than the original set. And not's even talk about the circuits itself, which had much better CRT drivers and the like. (Do try swapping a 92-94 Panasonic GAOO circuit in a 2001 Panasonic. You'd be amazed how much more definition there is.)

Long story short, CRT was perfected (the tube itself) at the end of the 80s.(HD was perfected at the end of the 90's early 2000 (and even higher resolutions than most sets of today) Tube vacuum was close to perfect too and lead to VERY long life. Like I said, I've repaired 80s Mitsubishi sets and 70s Panasonic's that had close to perfect contrast ratios and the only reason they were dying was because of bad solders or dead capacitors (that were dying at 15-25 years old while modern TV's capacitors die at 2y)

Quality control was so lame from around 95 on and especially in the 2000s. Ever had a Zenith go dark after 4 years? Before, a Zenith lasted 30 years... we received dead or close to dead tubes directly from the company... you break em up and almost no air enters the tube.....



^Panasonic has one of the best quality controls even though they moved to Mexico. The sets are Really well built. (10000h capacitors, good ventilation, etc)
 

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Why should you change your Samsung LCD set? It's only a small repair really if it does break at that age. Any tech can repair it, even you can if you know how to solder.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by homerging /forum/post/20725980


I'd be interested to know what ingredient made those CRTs last so long so well
. I've never seen a CRT TV survive long term use without trashed phosphers that lose all shadow detail and have some degree of redshift. Many CRT monitors were lucky to survive 5 years of heavy use before they went all dark.

I've had good experience with Trinitrons. Last summer I picked up a Sony CPD-420GS monitor on Craigslist for free, and it's probably the best display device I've ever owned, despite being almost 11 years old at the time I got it. Still has a nice, bright picture with great color. Keeping the Brightness at about 20 and the Contrast at 40 gives me a picture that's plenty bright. Ditto a Dell UltraScan P991, though they do seem prone to burn-in and plastic cracking.


I also own a Sony PVM-1341 (about 18 years old). Now granted, that's a professional-market monitor and as such can safely be assumed to be of a higher build quality, but that thing is also still working great.


My Toshiba CF26C30 TV (1993) still works great too. Back in 1993, Toshiba was still making quality TVs. 2004 and after, not so much. Just had a RCA F25442 (2001) die on me a couple days ago; it probably didn't even have 1,000 hours of use over its lifetime.


Keep in mind that LCD TVs (with the exception of LED-backlit ones) depend on phosphorescence as well, so you can expect a nice yellow tint to your picture after several years, though if I recall correctly, NEC has introduced a color correction algorithm on some of its late-model monitors to compensate for that. The panel may be rated for 50,000 hours or more, but that doesn't mean that other components won't fail long before that.
 

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^ Exactly waht I was saying in my post, 90s TV's were awesome in build quality. Quality was so much lower in the 2000s.

And yes, even LCD's can have burn-in! It's much longer than plasma and closer to CRT burn-in but it does happen.
 

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Discussion Starter #40

Quote:
Originally Posted by neccrttv /forum/post/20726604


Why should you change your Samsung LCD set? It's only a small repair really if it does break at that age. Any tech can repair it, even you can if you know how to solder.

Today, it's a lot more practical to just a buy a new one. These repair people will just charge an outrageous price to fix your set and you could've used that money to get yourself a new one instead. And there's no guarantee that they'll fix it right anyway. Maybe back in the 50s, sending your TV to the repair shop was the practical thing to do, but not anymore.


And besides, I don't even know if my Samsung TV will even break anytime soon. I was just assuming based on your statement that "all LCD's will break within 3-5 years of buying it." My uncle has a 5 year old Sony LCD TV. My cousin has a 4 year old Sony LCD. My friend has a 5 year old Vizio LCD TV. I have a 3 year old Samsung LCD TV. I don't know. So far, your theory has proven to be wrong. Just because you repair a lot of 2-3 year old LCDs, it doesn't prove anything. Nobody with a working LCD TV is going to walk into a repair shop and say, "Hey! My TV works fine. I don't need any repair!!!!" So, you don't really know how many long lasting LCD TVs are out there!
 
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