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Why do people like to waste money on things they don't need??? Isn't it true that one WILL NOT see a difference between 1080 and a 720p if your tv is less than 42in. So you paying clearly 25% more, is simply a waste of money. These guys need to make money so they come up with stuff like 10,000,000 resolution/colors or whatever. These are just numbers to get you to pay more. Tell me if I am wrong here.


I am very picky about my sound and video quality. My 50in has a 1080p .... BUT my bedroom 40in uses 720 and it's awesome. Got it for $470. Now that's a deal .... Samsung by the way.
 

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For a 42" TV if you through away 1/2 of all of the detail from a 1080i braodcast or a 1080p Blu_ray TVs you will have a much softer detailed image especially if your Viewing distance is less then about 8-10'.
 

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A lot depends on viewing distance, but even with that, some people simply want a 1080P display, even in the 32 inch screen size. Their money, their choice.
 

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You are wrong. It's not a numbers game to get you to spend more money. When it comes to pixel count 1920x1080 is a must. We are talking over 2 million pixels with 1080p, and around 900,000 pixels with 720p.



Why not get the 1080p panel? We are talking 1920x1080 compared to many low resolution variations of 720p including 1280x720 (true), 1024x768, 1366x768. There is a huge pixel count difference.


I would never buy a set thats 720p because I was going to be far away from it. What if I get up close to it? What if I move it somewhere else in the house?


Computer monitors are tiny and I would always buy the highest resolution unit I could, and I feel no different about HDTVs.


The viewing distance chart is dumb IMO. Its all out the window if you decide to get close to your set, where there is a HUGE difference in fine detail.


Once you see text on a screen at a store displaying tvs, you can clearly see how bad a 720p looks in comparison to a 1080p set. Considering all satellite and cable providers provide a 1920x1080 image, blu-ray discs and so on, its in your best interest to own such a set.


You didn't exactly mention distance either, but a 42" set isn't really small, you should be able to detect the difference quite easily, even from several feet away.
 

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the price difference between 720p and 1080p models isn't big enough anymore to even make this issue a big deal. and unless you're looking at a plasma, this issue is non-existent with LCDs; I don't know of any manufacturer that still makes a 40"+ 720p LCD.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by spyboy /forum/post/19535789


A lot depends on viewing distance, but even with that, some people simply want a 1080P display, even in the 32 inch screen size. Their money, their choice.

Hmmm... I think I've heard that last part somewhere before.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by walford /forum/post/19535522


For a 42" TV if you through away 1/2 of all of the detail from a 1080i braodcast or a 1080p Blu_ray TVs you will have a much softer detailed image especially if your Viewing distance is less then about 8-10'.

Perfectly put. Depends on how close you choose to sit. I would do 1080P if possible
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pianist718 /forum/post/19535324


Why do people like to waste money on things they don't need??? Isn't it true that one WILL NOT see a difference between 1080 and a 720p if your tv is less than 42in. So you paying clearly 25% more, is simply a waste of money. These guys need to make money so they come up with stuff like 10,000,000 resolution/colors or whatever. These are just numbers to get you to pay more. Tell me if I am wrong here.


I am very picky about my sound and video quality. My 50in has a 1080p .... BUT my bedroom 40in uses 720 and it's awesome. Got it for $470. Now that's a deal .... Samsung by the way.

Its awfully presumptuous of you to assume everyone's TV needs are equivalent to yours. For me and several members on this board, we use 32"-37" 1080p TVs as a full time PC monitor. And when you're sitting 2-3ft away from the TV, there's a huge noticeable difference between 720p and 1080p, especially with text.
 

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It's like asking someone why they would buy an BMW or Mercedes Benz rather than a Honda Accord or Ford Fusion.


They're all about the same size and they all basically do the same thing.


So what's the answer... this is America and we are generally still allowed to buy what we want not what someone else thinks we should have.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BoilerJim /forum/post/19536133


It's like asking someone why they would buy an BMW or Mercedes Benz rather than a Honda Accord or Ford Fusion.


They're all about the same size and they all basically do the same thing.


So what's the answer... this is America and we are generally still allowed to buy what we want not what someone else thinks we should have.


This is the incorrect analogy as there are plenty of "Honda Accord or Ford Fusion" 1080p sets. This is more about what you can see. I find it funny that even on this board, we have people saying that the set has more pixels so its better. The fact is, HDTV(actual tv broadcasts, cable, etc) is less than 1080p and has to be upconverted by the set. Sets do a great job, but the fact remains, 720p looks best on a native 720p set. Both 720p and 1080i are done really well on a good 1080p set, but you're not losing detail if you don't have a 1080p set. I find it funny that I read many of these posts complaining about the NFL on Fox or ESPN broadcasts looking poor when they have 1080p sets. Well no $hi& its going to look less than optimal on a 1080p set. Especially when you're at a size and distance that really can't take advantage of 1080p. Seriously, if your thing is watching actual HDTV broadcasts instead of Blu-Ray, you might actually have a nicer experience with a higher quality, but less expensive 720p set. Especially a plasma.
 

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Turn on 1:1 pixel mapping to get the benefit from a 1080p display. The killing of detail/sharpness from not turning off the overscan is very clear when using a PC or test pattern as a source. 720p sets scale ALL inputs except a PC running at 1360 x 768. A 720p set running 1360 x 768 (or whatever the actual native resolution is) will be SHARPER than a 1080p set w/o 1:1 pixel mapping enabled.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Servicetech571
Turn on 1:1 pixel mapping to get the benefit from a 1080p display. The killing of detail/sharpness from not turning off the overscan is very clear when using a PC or test pattern as a source. 720p sets scale ALL inputs except a PC running at 1360 x 768. A 720p set running 1360 x 768 (or whatever the actual native resolution is) will be SHARPER than a 1080p set w/o 1:1 pixel mapping enabled.
just to be clear, how is this done on your average 1080p set?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Excellent
just to be clear, how is this done on your average 1080p set?
It should be on without having to change anything... unless there is some sort of overscan setting that breaks it. ?? If the source is 1080i/p and your set is 1080i/p then what it displays should be mapped 1:1 I'd hope.
 

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1) Retina Display: "A fancy screen, with a 326dpi resolution. Jobs said "there's a magic number around 300dpi, if you hold something about 10-12 inches away from your eye, it's the limit of the human retina to distinguish pixels." Note that it is a function of BOTH dpi and distance. So if you are sitting 2 feet from your monitor you will likely see a difference. But for TV viewing it will depends on the following


2) Source: If your source is MPEG2, it is likely 1080 or 720/768 will not matter. And...


3) ...Not all TV are the same: 480i or 24p will depend on deinterlacing/ inverse telecine capability of your set. There will be big difference between olevia 1080p and pio 720p sets, and it is not just a resolution thing. Scaling capability will be key and so depends on your source. It is not rocket science to display 1080 source on a 1080p TV, but more challenging to scale 1080 source to 720p or 480 source to 1080p.


4) Not all people are the same: Some of us have "hawk eyes" and can see differences that normal people cannot see. So we shouldn't base on one size fit all. Whether we see it or not is hardly a benchmark for others. But science and statistics can give a rough guide.


Wonder if this debate will continue to 4K resolution
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by damag0r /forum/post/19538196


It should be on without having to change anything... unless there is some sort of overscan setting that breaks it. ?? If the source is 1080i/p and your set is 1080i/p then what it displays should be mapped 1:1 I'd hope.

Oddly enough this ISN'T true. 1:1 is OFF by default even when used with a 1080i/p signal!! You must go into the menu and use "just scan" or "screen fit" as the aspect ratio. Sony calls theirs "full pixel".
 

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I sit about 24 inches from my 32-inch 1080p TV, so I would think I need its higher resolution.


We have a 32 inch 720p in the bedroom that, unfortunately, we sit about 15 feet away from, and you can barely tell HD from SD.
 
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