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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got a question about something that I've never fully understood. I figure this is the best place to find the right answer.


I have a 4:3 HD set. Yeah I know, I'm living in the past. :p

My question is this. Say you were watching a program on a widescreen and there were two people, one of the far left and one on the far right.

What would I see on my 4:3 set? Would I see absolutely nothing because both people are off the screen or would the TV condense it and squeeze them together?


Thanks for the answer in advance.


Tom
 

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If a program completely filled a widescreen tv left to right and top to bottom, you'd see the exact same picture width wise on your tv. The only difference is you'd have black bars on the top and bottom of your 4x3 screen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by DP1
If a program completely filled a widescreen tv left to right and top to bottom, you'd see the exact same picture width wise on your tv. The only difference is you'd have black bars on the top and bottom of your 4x3 screen.
So I don't actually lose the picture off to the sides like I thought I might. Thank you, that's good to know.


Tom
 

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Or the TV is doing a zoom. One of the following could be what is going on:


1. The scene is zoomed to fill the screen top to bottom. This causes the left and right of the picture to move off screen, resulting in lost picture information.


2. The scene is stretched to fill the screen. This results in people who are really skinny. It would be Mariah Carey's dream - being skinny without all the flies and death and stuff. But it isn't the dream of people wanting circles to look like circles.


3. The image will be on your set with letterbox bars on the top and bottom and you lose nothing. Of course, then the program wouldn't really be filling the screen from top to bottom, so you would lose a little real estate from your TV, but the picture would be complete and accurate.
 

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Tom, most of the time widescreen films shown on a 4:3 TV are shown in pan & scan versions. If you see black bars at the top and bottom then you may be seein the whole picture but not always.


With pan and scan, a 4:3 frame pans and scans from left to right and sometimes up and down within the widescreen image (this gives the image that you see on your telly, a stationary image, you don't see the panning/scanning). This is usually a set pattern which follows the action but leads to difficulties as you expressed about two people at opposite sides of the screen not being able to fit into the same shot. This is why widescreen is better (whether letterboxed on a 4:3 tv or 16:9 tv) you get to see the whole original film.


Do a search on the forums or net on pan & scan and all will become clear.


cosaw
 
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